Amy's ride

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by SuzieB, Dec 31, 2005.

  1. EuanB

    EuanB New Member

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    No it certainly isn't.

    The start was just a little bit congested, my group ended up parking the bikes and waiting for it to thin out. We weren't in a hurry and that turned out to be a good move.

    With thousands exiting and type A personalities in the mix it's not surprising that some would forgo the road rules to get ahead. You don't get that problem with cars because they just won't fit in the road, with bikes you have to be conscious of how many bicycles you're overtaking. It's really tempting to overtake three bicycles side by side, reasoning that it doesn't take up that much more room. Then it's four, then it's five and then some people kid themselves that they're in a peleton and not riding on the road as part of normal traffic.

    No easy answers, there's rules to be obeyed and it's the individuals not obeying the rules who are at fault. Not the event and not cyclists in general. Much the same as motorists really, shock horror we're all people.
     


  2. TimC

    TimC Guest

    On 2006-01-10, EuanB (aka Bruce)
    was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea:
    >
    > Craig Strong Wrote:
    >> Hey People what a great day we all had,
    >> We are now getting bagged by the opinionist in the Geelong Advertiser
    >> as the front page of yesterdays paper had a photo from along the
    >> portarlington road showing us riding about 10 abreast and encroaching
    >> into the oncoming lane.
    >> Not a good look for encouraging cycling safety

    > No it certainly isn't.
    >
    > The start was just a little bit congested, my group ended up parking
    > the bikes and waiting for it to thin out. We weren't in a hurry and
    > that turned out to be a good move.
    >
    > With thousands exiting and type A personalities in the mix it's not
    > surprising that some would forgo the road rules to get ahead. You
    > don't get that problem with cars because they just won't fit in the
    > road, with bikes you have to be conscious of how many bicycles you're
    > overtaking. It's really tempting to overtake three bicycles side by
    > side, reasoning that it doesn't take up that much more room. Then it's
    > four, then it's five and then some people kid themselves that they're in
    > a peleton and not riding on the road as part of normal traffic.


    Mind you, I didn't agree with people insisting that we move left and
    not take the second lane in the dual lane road. Sure, there were
    impatient drivers wanting to go entirely too fast past us in the right
    hand lane. We weren't there on that road for very long, so they can
    just deal and wait. If the faster riders used the right hand lane,
    then the cars wouldn't have been /able/ to zip past us so unsafely.
    And it would have dispersed the crowd a little earlier, which would
    have reduced any congestion problem the impatient cagers would have
    perceived.

    --
    TimC
    Center meeting at 4pm in 3C-273.
     
  3. SuzieB

    SuzieB New Member

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    Yes, that's probably the only comment I would have to make, they could have put witches hats up and limited the cars to one lane only from the exit of the gardens until maybe that line of witches hats where we were forced into the bike lane. The other things I thought would have been useful was to improve the method for the trail people to get into the right turn lane to pick up the rail trail. It seemed badly organised. Given that the majority of people were probably through that area in about half an hour it would be an easy thing to control. Our group went through near the rear of the pack so I imagine it would have been a lot more chaotic ahead of us.

    I am sure they have been some interesting lessons learnt and the ride was so successful that I am sure it will be even better next year. I am going to write a letter to the organisers to thank them for the ride and make the suggestions above.
     
  4. SuzieB

    SuzieB New Member

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    Some more related news from The Age today...

    Emotional coach on the road to recovery By Melissa Ryan, Adelaide
    January 13, 2006

    WHEN cyclists Alexis Rhodes and Kate Nichols made their comeback to road racing last week from the terrible accident that claimed the life of Amy Gillett-Safe and inflicted frightful injuries on her teammates, Australian women's road coach Warren McDonald, who had witnessed that deadly day last July, had his heart warmed.

    When the Commonwealth Games individual time-trial is contested on March 21 — the event in which Gillett-Safe had been aiming to win the gold medal — McDonald and the women's team will be flooded with tragic and joyful memories of Gillett-Safe, as they honour her by seeking the victory she had wanted.

    "(The Melbourne time-trial) may be not emotional, but a heart-warming thing. I think riders would want to ride to the best of their ability because that's what Amy would want. That was Amy's gift, as a time-trialler as well," McDonald said. "I think anywhere in the next sort of 12 months to do with time-trialling, there's going to be a memory for people because that's what Amy did and also she was a very strong and very committed team member."

    He was following the six riders — Nichols, Rhodes, Gillett-Safe, Katie Brown, Lorian Graham, who will not defend her Australian road championship today as she has not yet returned from her injuries, and Louise Yaxley — in a team car when a German teenager careered into his charges.

    McDonald carries on, bearing the emotional and psychological scars from the day. "Last year, there was triumph and tragedy. We finished with the world No. 1 and then with such a tragedy, it's a coach's worst nightmare. It affects different people in different ways and with me, and the five other girls, I've tried to be strong and move on.

    "It has been hard, it's been very hard. But when you see the girls back riding again … the cycling family and my wife (Sian) have been pillars of strength to help me to where I am today," he said.

    "As a lot of people are saying, the first 12 months is the hardest, especially with the (Amy Gillett-Safe) Foundation ride that myself and my wife and a lot of people rode in Geelong.

    "It brings back the heart-warming memories of Amy, but also it's still very emotional and it's still very tiring."

    Today, Nichols and Rhodes will be among the 57 starters in the Australian road championship at Mount Torrens, in the Adelaide Hills, where the national title will be decided over five laps of a 19.5-kilometre course.

    Among the favourites to take out the title, which has no bearing on Commonwealth Games selection, are Victorian Katie Mactier, Olympic gold medallist Sara Carrigan and world No. 1 Oenone Wood.

    Of Nichols and Rhodes, McDonald said: "It's just amazing, it's a testament to all of the girls and their drive and desire. That's the reason they're back.
    "Different riders had different injuries and it's going to take them longer but all of them have that drive. You get a bit of a chill down the spine to see them back racing — not a chill, you'd call it adrenaline. It's great to see. It's a heart-warming feeling."
     
  5. cfsmtb

    cfsmtb New Member

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  6. kyra

    kyra New Member

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    Sorry for the late post all... a few of us from work rode the 120km stretch. think we had a 27kmh ave with 4 or 5 stops along the way. Haven't ridden much lately and the first little incline was a struggle! Found my legs about half way and came home well.

    Great event, so many people supporting the foundation in its first year... will be back each year for this event.
     
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