Ancient touring bike?

Discussion in 'Touring and recreational cycling' started by nuliajuk, Jan 16, 2010.

  1. nuliajuk

    nuliajuk New Member

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    I recently posted my 23 year old touring bike on an online classified service similar to Craigslist. It wasn't a very expensive bike to begin with and has a lot of miles in it (although well maintained) so I listed it at $85. Some fellow showed up the other night, took all sorts of measurements, examined every millimeter of it and mentioned he wanted to do a tour of Iceland and was looking for a bike to do it on.
    Although I certainly want to sell it, I find it hard to resist the urge to tell him to look for something newer that would be easier to get parts for. He seems a bit daft. I suppose it's not my business if he wants to take an almost-antique bike over mostly unpaved roads, but... should I try to talk him out of it?
     
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  2. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    No. The potential buyer must be aware of what he wants ... most importantly, I would think he wants tire-and-fender clearance. But, who knows?

    Since your bike post-dates the incursion of French bikes, all of the components on your bike's frame can be readily replaced with current components.

    What is the brand and/or model of the bike you are selling?

    BTW. Half my bikes are as old as the bike you are selling ... personally, I think that a bike has to be older than the owner/rider before possibly being classified as being "ancient" ... some people (not me) apparently prefer the appellation "vintage" for their older bikes!
     
  3. 64Paramount

    64Paramount Active Member

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    For what it's worth......my newest bike is a 26 year old Cannondale and my other bike is a 46 year old Paramount, and I don't consider either to be "ancient". :D
     
  4. Rudolf Harris

    Rudolf Harris New Member

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    There are different kinds of bike, which are of different models and some bikes are unique and historic in nature as well as they have more demand and are also famous in the market as its antique and unique characteristics.
     
  5. cycleheimer

    cycleheimer New Member

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    Your bike may be a very good value at $85, or even undervalued. What make and model is it? Does it have cantilever brakes, triple chain wheel, bosses for fenders, racks, water bottles? What frame material does it use? Does it have a 40 spoke rear wheel? Does it have 700C wheels or 27" wheels? New tires and tubes and a good regreasing should be undertaken by any seller buying a used bike for any serious amount of riding. New brake pads may also be in order. Prices for new touring bikes typically start at around $1,000.
     
  6. King Plum

    King Plum New Member

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    Rant Alert::rolleyes:

    This is a good post, absolutely, some of us are on a strict budget. Some bikes made back then are even called "Tourers" like mine, 531 steel, in fairly good shape, mechanically it's a bit down but I'm trying to see it through as a project, I have ridden it plenty and what it is is the original front and rear derailleurs (mechs as they say in the UK as the "like Craigslist" is probably "Gumtree") and Suntour mighty shifters never quite jived well but it's close to being my best frame at least, lots of bicycles are out there and I've gotten a fair # in my life for under a hundred, some of us don't readily care to sink a grand into a bike and then, end up being disappointed. I mean really, I won't name names but it's not too hard to find people unsatisfied with some bike they just bought. Some of those "vintage" bikes are really good rides, I put a brand X steel triple crank (yes, they are out there cheap, under $20 I think) on one of my vintage roadies and it goes up hills with real ease if not like a dream. Steel is a bit heavier but a lot of Tourers want the steel if they are carting a lot around.

    Plus besides all this, when you start adding in extras, lights, racks, panniers, maybe a new mech, a new wheel or two, etc. that's beginning to put a lot into a bike.

    I know over in the UK, they sell a lot of great bikes we Americans would love but there, there is such a history of bike makers, you might get a real charming bike and not sink that much money into it. I've seen I think Hutchinsons along those lines and the ads are so frequently marked "pick up only." It's almost an embarrassment of riches for those in the UK to us. But then on the other hand, they may have fewer of the continental bikes that we might see in the USA. Canada too, they've got an interesting market with I believe Mercian and the like. So, I've just decided to be happy with whatever I can find, this area is pretty good compared to some other parts of the US.

    In fact, a few times, I've read forums from over in the UK and if the company is still around that made the bike, it does not seem uncommon to send it back to them for refurbishment/restoration projects. Kind of cool.
     
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