Andrew Chung FAQ

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by Harold McNamara, Aug 30, 2003.

  1. An individual who purports to be a board-certified cardiologist with
    an international reputation has been regularly posting to this and
    other health-oriented newsgroups over the last several years. The
    posts have been under the name Andrew Chung, with an originating
    domain of heartmdphd.com and (before that), emory.edu.

    Other names that this individual has apparently used include Michael
    Roose and "MU".

    The posts have the following characteristics:

    1. They dispense medical advice on heart disease, diabetes, and
    weight-loss.
    2. They are often off-topic, and are cross-posted freely.
    3. They frequently contain threats of legal action for "libel",
    usually when someone else disagrees with Chung's views.

    There is an Andrew Chung who resides in the Atlanta area, living in a
    rather seedy suburb of Atlanta. This indiviudal is unaffiliated with
    any hospitals in the area, making it extremely unlikely that he has an
    active medical practice.

    There is also a Web site, www.heartmdphd.com, that contains a great
    deal of self-serving information concerning Andrew Chung, and also
    features a so-called cyberstalking section that hosts insults directed
    at those who have criticized Chung's on-line articles hyping his
    "two-pound" diet and other recommended treatments.

    In all likelihood Dr. Chung is at worst a quack and at best a lonely
    and isolated individual who compensates for a feeling of failure and
    emptiness with his online shenanigans.

    In any case, his medical advice should be avoided, or at least
    verified by one's own physician.
     
    Tags:


  2. StrandgecK

    StrandgecK Guest

    LOL, all of his pages have a bunch of words you can barley see at the bottom
    so that his page would show up more often on search engine.

    "Harold McNamara" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > An individual who purports to be a board-certified cardiologist with
    > an international reputation has been regularly posting to this and
    > other health-oriented newsgroups over the last several years. The
    > posts have been under the name Andrew Chung, with an originating
    > domain of heartmdphd.com and (before that), emory.edu.
    >
    > Other names that this individual has apparently used include Michael
    > Roose and "MU".
    >
    > The posts have the following characteristics:
    >
    > 1. They dispense medical advice on heart disease, diabetes, and
    > weight-loss.
    > 2. They are often off-topic, and are cross-posted freely.
    > 3. They frequently contain threats of legal action for "libel",
    > usually when someone else disagrees with Chung's views.
    >
    > There is an Andrew Chung who resides in the Atlanta area, living in a
    > rather seedy suburb of Atlanta. This indiviudal is unaffiliated with
    > any hospitals in the area, making it extremely unlikely that he has an
    > active medical practice.
    >
    > There is also a Web site, www.heartmdphd.com, that contains a great
    > deal of self-serving information concerning Andrew Chung, and also
    > features a so-called cyberstalking section that hosts insults directed
    > at those who have criticized Chung's on-line articles hyping his
    > "two-pound" diet and other recommended treatments.
    >
    > In all likelihood Dr. Chung is at worst a quack and at best a lonely
    > and isolated individual who compensates for a feeling of failure and
    > emptiness with his online shenanigans.
    >
    > In any case, his medical advice should be avoided, or at least
    > verified by one's own physician.
     
  3. Bob Cardone

    Bob Cardone Guest

    And there are pieces of Fecal matter like you , that have no
    credentials in anything that is meaningful to anyone , that attack
    someone that tries to help people free of charge.

    Do us all a favor, and F*** Off, a$$hole.

    Bob



    [email protected] (Harold McNamara) wrote:

    >An individual who purports to be a board-certified cardiologist with
    >an international reputation has been regularly posting to this and
    >other health-oriented newsgroups over the last several years. The
    >posts have been under the name Andrew Chung, with an originating
    >domain of heartmdphd.com and (before that), emory.edu.
    >
    >Other names that this individual has apparently used include Michael
    >Roose and "MU".
    >

    ..

    Much BS snipped.
     
  4. "Bob Cardone" <[email protected]!mindspring.com> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > And there are pieces of Fecal matter like you , that have no
    > credentials in anything that is meaningful to anyone , that attack
    > someone that tries to help people free of charge.
    >
    > Do us all a favor, and F*** Off, a$$hole.
    >
    > Bob


    Now, now, now - your hero, Dr????? Chung, should warn you about slander and
    the threat of your being reported to your ISP.

    BTW - the advice is NOT free if a solicition is made, directly or implied,
    for fee for sercices included in said individuals responses.

    >
    >
    >
    > [email protected] (Harold McNamara) wrote:
    >
    > >An individual who purports to be a board-certified cardiologist with
    > >an international reputation has been regularly posting to this and
    > >other health-oriented newsgroups over the last several years. The
    > >posts have been under the name Andrew Chung, with an originating
    > >domain of heartmdphd.com and (before that), emory.edu.
    > >
    > >Other names that this individual has apparently used include Michael
    > >Roose and "MU".
    > >

    > .
    >
    > Much BS snipped.
    >
    >
     
  5. Bill

    Bill Guest

    "Harold McNamara" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > An individual who purports to be a board-certified cardiologist with
    > an international reputation has been regularly posting to this and
    > other health-oriented newsgroups over the last several years. The
    > posts have been under the name Andrew Chung, with an originating
    > domain of heartmdphd.com and (before that), emory.edu.
    >
    > Other names that this individual has apparently used include Michael
    > Roose and "MU".
    >
    > The posts have the following characteristics:
    >
    > 1. They dispense medical advice on heart disease, diabetes, and
    > weight-loss.
    > 2. They are often off-topic, and are cross-posted freely.
    > 3. They frequently contain threats of legal action for "libel",
    > usually when someone else disagrees with Chung's views.
    >
    > There is an Andrew Chung who resides in the Atlanta area, living in a
    > rather seedy suburb of Atlanta. This indiviudal is unaffiliated with
    > any hospitals in the area, making it extremely unlikely that he has an
    > active medical practice.
    >
    > There is also a Web site, www.heartmdphd.com, that contains a great
    > deal of self-serving information concerning Andrew Chung, and also
    > features a so-called cyberstalking section that hosts insults directed
    > at those who have criticized Chung's on-line articles hyping his
    > "two-pound" diet and other recommended treatments.
    >
    > In all likelihood Dr. Chung is at worst a quack and at best a lonely
    > and isolated individual who compensates for a feeling of failure and
    > emptiness with his online shenanigans.
    >
    > In any case, his medical advice should be avoided, or at least
    > verified by one's own physician.


    Actually, from what I have seen his advice has been quite knowledgeable and
    helpful. Two pound diet issues aside - which seems to inflame a lot of
    passion - can you provide some examples, or any example for that matter, of
    medical information that he has provided that is factually incorrect?

    If not, why do you believe such advice should be avoided?

    Bill
     
  6. [email protected] (Harold McNamara) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    <unsigned libelous statements snipped>

    More hissing...

    FYI Note: I am aware that I am responding to a cross-posted message.
    Because the author of the message to which I am responding did not
    request that the header be trimmed, I have not trimmed it. If you are
    upset about reading this message, a few suggestions:

    (1) Yell at Harold McNamara (if such a person even exists)
    (2) Report 209.223.213.229 to his ISP ([email protected]) for
    violating their TOS with his libel and defamation.
    (3) Killfile this thread.
    (4) Killfile me.
    (5) Read about free speech.

    This discussion(s) is related to the 2 pound diet approach (2PD) which
    is described completely at:

    http://www.heartmdphd.com/wtloss.asp

    Though Dr. Chung invented this approach, he did not initiate this
    Usenet discussion(s). His participation in this discussion(s) has
    been voluntary and has been conducted in the spirit of community
    service. His motivation has been entirely altruistic and has arisen
    from his religious beliefs as a Christian. Jesus freely gave of
    Himself to better the health of folks He touched:

    http://www.heartmdphd.com/healer.asp

    From the outset, it has been clear that there are those who are
    vehemently opposed to the 2 pound diet approach. They have debated
    Dr. Chung on every perceived weakness of the 2 pound diet approach and
    have lost the argument soundly at every point:

    http://www.heartmdphd.com/wtlossfaqs.asp

    These debates are archived on Google in their entirety within this and
    other discussion threads.

    However, instead of conceding gracefully that they've lost the
    argument(s), certain parties have redirected their hatred of the 2
    pound diet approach toward its author. The rationale appears to be
    "if you can not discredit the message then try to discredit the
    messenger."

    Initially, these folks accused the messenger of "trolling." A "troll"
    is someone who posts under the cloak of anonymity messages with no
    redeeming discussion value and with the sole purpose of starting
    "flame" wars.

    These hateful folks lost credibility with this accusation when the
    following observations were made:

    (1) Dr. Chung has not been posting anonymously.
    (2) The 2PD has been on-topic for the Usenet discussion groups hosting
    the discussion(s).
    (a) Those who are failing low-carbing can dovetail LC with the
    2PD to achieve near-ideal weight.
    (b) Obese diabetics improve their blood glucose control when
    their weight becomes near-ideal.
    (c) For (b) see: http://tinyurl.com/levc
    (3) Dr. Chung did not start the discussion(s).
    (4) The 2 pound diet approach is 100% free (no profit motive).
    (5) Dr. Chung's credentials are real and easily verified on-line
    (including jpegs of the actual diplomas).

    Full of hatred, frustration, and desperation, certain individuals have
    tried to attack Dr. Chung's credentials knowing full well that they
    were attempting to libel him. One notable example is Mr. Pastorio:

    http://www.heartmdphd.asp/libel.asp

    When the full light was cast on Mr. Pastorio's libelous statements,
    the hateful folks hiding in the darkness of anonymity only hissed
    louder in support of their fallen hero.

    Fortunately, those who have been following this discussion(s) either
    actively or as lurkers can easily dismiss the hisses, for what they
    are, using the on-line third-party resources at:

    http://www.heartmdphd.com/profile.asp

    where Dr. Chung's credentials can be verified many times over and
    libelous claims that credentials were bought are easily and summarily
    debunked.

    Moreover, readers need only make the following observations concerning
    the anon posters who continue to hiss (ie JC Der Koenig and Mack):

    (1) They are anonymous and thus they expect to have no credibility (or
    accountability).
    (2) They are by their Usenet history courtesy of Google, unsavory
    characters.
    (3) They have not added anything to the discussion(s) except to
    deliver one-sided insults.
    (4) They complain about alleged cross-posts from Dr. Chung by
    cross-posting.
    (5) They do not complain about cross-posts from folks who attack the
    2PD or its author.

    and conclude that these anon posters deserve only their kill file.

    It is my hope that the above brings new readers of this thread up to
    speed.

    It will remain my pleasure to participate here on Usenet above the din
    of hissing from the peanut gallery.


    Sincerely,

    Andrew

    --
    Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD
    Board-Certified Cardiologist
    http://www.heartmdphd.com
     
  7. "StrandgecK" <[email protected]_!NEGSPAM!_cox.net> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > LOL, all of his pages have a bunch of words you can barley see at the bottom
    > so that his page would show up more often on search engine.


    barley?

    FYI Note: I am aware that I am responding to a cross-posted message.
    Because the author of the message to which I am responding did not
    request that the header be trimmed, I have not trimmed it. If you are
    upset about reading this message, a few suggestions:

    (1) Yell at "StrandgecK"
    (2) Report "StrandgecK" to his ISP for violating their TOS with his
    libel and defamation.
    (3) Killfile this thread.
    (4) Killfile me.
    (5) Read about free speech.

    This discussion(s) is related to the 2 pound diet approach (2PD) which
    is described completely at:

    http://www.heartmdphd.com/wtloss.asp

    Though Dr. Chung invented this approach, he did not initiate this
    Usenet discussion(s). His participation in this discussion(s) has
    been voluntary and has been conducted in the spirit of community
    service. His motivation has been entirely altruistic and has arisen
    from his religious beliefs as a Christian. Jesus freely gave of
    Himself to better the health of folks He touched:

    http://www.heartmdphd.com/healer.asp

    From the outset, it has been clear that there are those who are
    vehemently opposed to the 2 pound diet approach. They have debated
    Dr. Chung on every perceived weakness of the 2 pound diet approach and
    have lost the argument soundly at every point:

    http://www.heartmdphd.com/wtlossfaqs.asp

    These debates are archived on Google in their entirety within this and
    other discussion threads.

    However, instead of conceding gracefully that they've lost the
    argument(s), certain parties have redirected their hatred of the 2
    pound diet approach toward its author. The rationale appears to be
    "if you can not discredit the message then try to discredit the
    messenger."

    Initially, these folks accused the messenger of "trolling." A "troll"
    is someone who posts under the cloak of anonymity messages with no
    redeeming discussion value and with the sole purpose of starting
    "flame" wars.

    These hateful folks lost credibility with this accusation when the
    following observations were made:

    (1) Dr. Chung has not been posting anonymously.
    (2) The 2PD has been on-topic for the Usenet discussion groups hosting
    the discussion(s).
    (a) Those who are failing low-carbing can dovetail LC with the
    2PD to achieve near-ideal weight.
    (b) Obese diabetics improve their blood glucose control when
    their weight becomes near-ideal.
    (c) For (b) see: http://tinyurl.com/levc
    (3) Dr. Chung did not start the discussion(s).
    (4) The 2 pound diet approach is 100% free (no profit motive).
    (5) Dr. Chung's credentials are real and easily verified on-line
    (including jpegs of the actual diplomas).

    Full of hatred, frustration, and desperation, certain individuals have
    tried to attack Dr. Chung's credentials knowing full well that they
    were attempting to libel him. One notable example is Mr. Pastorio:

    http://www.heartmdphd.asp/libel.asp

    When the full light was cast on Mr. Pastorio's libelous statements,
    the hateful folks hiding in the darkness of anonymity only hissed
    louder in support of their fallen hero.

    Fortunately, those who have been following this discussion(s) either
    actively or as lurkers can easily dismiss the hisses, for what they
    are, using the on-line third-party resources at:

    http://www.heartmdphd.com/profile.asp

    where Dr. Chung's credentials can be verified many times over and
    libelous claims that credentials were bought are easily and summarily
    debunked.

    Moreover, readers need only make the following observations concerning
    the anon posters who continue to hiss (ie JC Der Koenig and Mack):

    (1) They are anonymous and thus they expect to have no credibility (or
    accountability).
    (2) They are by their Usenet history courtesy of Google, unsavory
    characters.
    (3) They have not added anything to the discussion(s) except to
    deliver one-sided insults.
    (4) They complain about alleged cross-posts from Dr. Chung by
    cross-posting.
    (5) They do not complain about cross-posts from folks who attack the
    2PD or its author.

    and conclude that these anon posters deserve only their kill file.

    It is my hope that the above brings new readers of this thread up to
    speed.

    It will remain my pleasure to participate here on Usenet above the din
    of hissing from the peanut gallery.


    Sincerely,

    Andrew

    --
    Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD
    Board-Certified Cardiologist
    http://www.heartmdphd.com
     
  8. "Paul E. Lehmann" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > "Bob Cardone" <[email protected]!mindspring.com> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > And there are pieces of Fecal matter like you , that have no
    > > credentials in anything that is meaningful to anyone , that attack
    > > someone that tries to help people free of charge.
    > >
    > > Do us all a favor, and F*** Off, a$$hole.
    > >
    > > Bob

    >
    > Now, now, now - your hero, Dr????? Chung, should warn you about slander and
    > the threat of your being reported to your ISP.


    Bob Cardone need not fear for speaking the truth.

    You on the other hand along with your ilk have much to fear.

    See your friend Mr. Pastorio who is trembling in the corner a mere
    shadow of a person eating too many mushrooms.

    --
    Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD
    Board-Certified Cardiologist
    http://www.heartmdphd.com
     
  9. Bob Cardone <[email protected]!mindspring.com> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > And there are pieces of Fecal matter like you , that have no
    > credentials in anything that is meaningful to anyone , that attack
    > someone that tries to help people free of charge.
    >
    > Do us all a favor, and F*** Off, a$$hole.
    >
    > Bob
    >


    Thank you for the support, Bob.

    Regards,

    Andrew

    --
    Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD
    Board-Certified Cardiologist
    http://www.heartmdphd.com

    P.S. These folks really do fear being disconnected from their ISPs.
    All it takes is just a few folks to send a copy of their posts with
    the full headers to their ISPs for what is clearly libelous/defamatory
    statements and it is unlikely you will see them again for a while
    (that's what has been happening to JC, Mack, et al).
     
  10. "Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "Phil Holman" <[email protected]> wrote in message

    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > "Harold McNamara" <[email protected]> wrote in message > In all
    > > likelihood Dr. Chung is at worst a quack and at best a lonely
    > > > and isolated individual who compensates for a feeling of failure and
    > > > emptiness with his online shenanigans.
    > > >
    > > > In any case, his medical advice should be avoided, or at least
    > > > verified by one's own physician.

    > >
    > > What qualifications do you possess to make this statement?
    > >
    > > Phil Holman

    >
    > Folks who don't sign their posts generally have zero qualifications
    > and are
    > "at best a lonely and isolated individual who compensates for a
    > feeling of failure and emptiness with his online shenanigans."
    >
    > --
    > Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD
    > Board-Certified Cardiologist
    > http://www.heartmdphd.com


    I believe in psychology, your statement above would be called "projection".
    You seem to
    be projecting your failures and weaknesses into others because you can not
    stand to
    see those very qualities in yourself.
     
  11. Bob Cardone

    Bob Cardone Guest

    "Tiger Lily" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"Phil Holman" <[email protected]> wrote in message .earthlink.net...
    >> What qualifications do you possess to make this statement?
    >>
    >> Phil Holman

    >
    >common sense and an ability to read?
    >


    I knew a Tiger Lilly that used to work in a Strip club in Town. Is
    that you? She was pretty bad, about 60 pounds overweight.

    Bob
     
  12. Carmen

    Carmen Guest

    Morning,
    On 31-Aug-2003, [email protected] (Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD)
    wrote:

    > > "Harold McNamara" <[email protected]> wrote in message > In
    > > all likelihood Dr. Chung is at worst a quack and at best a lonely
    > > > and isolated individual who compensates for a feeling of failure
    > > > and emptiness with his online shenanigans.
    > > >
    > > > In any case, his medical advice should be avoided, or at least
    > > > verified by one's own physician.


    > "Phil Holman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...


    > > What qualifications do you possess to make this statement?
    > >
    > > Phil Holman

    >
    > Folks who don't sign their posts generally have zero qualifications
    > and are "at best a lonely and isolated individual who compensates for
    > a
    > feeling of failure and emptiness with his online shenanigans.


    Point of order: Harold McNamara *did* have his name on his post (see
    above in the attributions). It was effectively signed thereby.
    Related question: Did you intend to take digs at people like
    Roose/Feedrus/Mu when castigating "folks who don't sign their posts"?
    Might there not be legitimate reasons to be incognito on the 'net?

    Take it easy,
    Carmen
     
  13. Bob Cardone

    Bob Cardone Guest

    "Carmen " <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Morning,
    >On 31-Aug-2003, [email protected] (Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD)
    >wrote:
    >
    >> > "Harold McNamara" <[email protected]> wrote in message > In
    >> > all likelihood Dr. Chung is at worst a quack and at best a lonely
    >> > > and isolated individual who compensates for a feeling of failure
    >> > > and emptiness with his online shenanigans.
    >> > >
    >> > > In any case, his medical advice should be avoided, or at least
    >> > > verified by one's own physician.

    >
    >> "Phil Holman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:<[email protected]>...

    >
    >> > What qualifications do you possess to make this statement?
    >> >
    >> > Phil Holman

    >>
    >> Folks who don't sign their posts generally have zero qualifications
    >> and are "at best a lonely and isolated individual who compensates for
    >> a
    >> feeling of failure and emptiness with his online shenanigans.

    >
    >Point of order: Harold McNamara *did* have his name on his post (see
    >above in the attributions). It was effectively signed thereby.
    >Related question: Did you intend to take digs at people like
    >Roose/Feedrus/Mu when castigating "folks who don't sign their posts"?
    >Might there not be legitimate reasons to be incognito on the 'net?
    >
    >Take it easy,
    >Carmen



    Anyone can assign any name to a Hotmail Account..

    Bob
     
  14. Carmen

    Carmen Guest

    Good morning,
    On 31-Aug-2003, Bob Cardone <[email protected]!mindspring.com> wrote:

    > Anyone can assign any name to a Hotmail Account..
    >
    > Bob


    True. But then again anyone can assign a name to *any* ISP account too.
    There's no guarantee that your name is Bob Cardone, nor is there any
    guarantee that my ISP email (chthomp AT bellsouth DOT net) has any
    relation to my name either. The only one of my email addresses that I
    can't change my name on is my AKO email address that ends in AT us DOT
    army DOT mil (Army one through my husband - he's an active duty
    soldier).

    Carmen
     
  15. Tiger Lily

    Tiger Lily Guest

    "Bob Cardone" <[email protected]!mindspring.com> wrote in message .com...
    > "Tiger Lily" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >"Phil Holman" <[email protected]> wrote in message .earthlink.net...
    > >> What qualifications do you possess to make this statement?
    > >>
    > >> Phil Holman

    > >
    > >common sense and an ability to read?
    > >

    >
    > I knew a Tiger Lilly that used to work in a Strip club in Town. Is
    > that you? She was pretty bad, about 60 pounds overweight.
    >
    > Bob


    lol, Bob..... sorry to disappoint you, but i don't think that was me.......
    never worked a strip club.... just 25 boring years of accounting....... in a
    suit to boot! lol

    does 5'6" and 125 lbs qualify me for overweight??

    just curious
     
  16. Bill

    Bill Guest

    "Bill" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Harold McNamara" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > An individual who purports to be a board-certified cardiologist with
    > > an international reputation has been regularly posting to this and
    > > other health-oriented newsgroups over the last several years. The
    > > posts have been under the name Andrew Chung, with an originating
    > > domain of heartmdphd.com and (before that), emory.edu.
    > >
    > > Other names that this individual has apparently used include Michael
    > > Roose and "MU".
    > >
    > > The posts have the following characteristics:
    > >
    > > 1. They dispense medical advice on heart disease, diabetes, and
    > > weight-loss.
    > > 2. They are often off-topic, and are cross-posted freely.
    > > 3. They frequently contain threats of legal action for "libel",
    > > usually when someone else disagrees with Chung's views.
    > >
    > > There is an Andrew Chung who resides in the Atlanta area, living in a
    > > rather seedy suburb of Atlanta. This indiviudal is unaffiliated with
    > > any hospitals in the area, making it extremely unlikely that he has an
    > > active medical practice.
    > >
    > > There is also a Web site, www.heartmdphd.com, that contains a great
    > > deal of self-serving information concerning Andrew Chung, and also
    > > features a so-called cyberstalking section that hosts insults directed
    > > at those who have criticized Chung's on-line articles hyping his
    > > "two-pound" diet and other recommended treatments.
    > >
    > > In all likelihood Dr. Chung is at worst a quack and at best a lonely
    > > and isolated individual who compensates for a feeling of failure and
    > > emptiness with his online shenanigans.
    > >
    > > In any case, his medical advice should be avoided, or at least
    > > verified by one's own physician.

    >
    > Actually, from what I have seen his advice has been quite knowledgeable and
    > helpful. Two pound diet issues aside - which seems to inflame a lot of
    > passion - can you provide some examples, or any example for that matter, of
    > medical information that he has provided that is factually incorrect?
    >
    > If not, why do you believe such advice should be avoided?
    >
    > Bill
    >
    >


    You guys can argue back and forth. I am still waiting for the orignal poster
    to provide the evidence outlined above to support his claim.

    Bill
     
  17. doe

    doe Guest

    >Subject: Re: Andrew Chung FAQ

    >> In any case, his medical advice should be avoided, or at least
    >> verified by one's own physician.

    >
    >Actually, from what I have seen his advice has been quite knowledgeable and
    >helpful. Two pound diet issues aside - which seems to inflame a lot of
    >passion - can you provide some examples, or any example for that matter, of
    >medical information that he has provided that is factually incorrect?


    http://www.google.com/groups?q=g:thl3147059742d&dq=&hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&sel
    m=20030830135620.14517.00000240%40mb-m12.aol.com

    Below is a snip from his response to my question above in the groups as to his
    seemingly cavalier attitude to the PROBLEM .. of .. craving / addiction to
    food.
    As you can see by the parts of my post he 'snipped' .. nothing at all was said
    about using pills to control diet .
    He either didn't read the post OR purposely lied ..

    Either way .. as a physician one could / should / would expect MORE of a
    'professional' attitude .. IF ..he were truly a medical professional.


    wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    > (3) If you feel hungry between meals, try drinking some water instead of
    > snacking. Also, doing things like your favorite hobbies or socializing can

    get
    > your mind off of eating.
    >
    > Spoken like a true doctor ..


    That's what I am. The alternative would be to swallow an appetite
    suppressing pill. Your choice.

    > "it's all in your head .."


    Sorry, the stomach is not in the head.

    > So your advice to someone who has food cravings is .. " bite the bullet .."

    ...
    > ?


    Nope. It is wait till supper. However, if you do snack, do keep
    track of it per the 2PD instructions at:

    http://www.heartmdphd.com/wtloss.asp

    > One would think addressing the underlying cause OF .. craving .. might be in
    > order ..?


    see:

    http://www.heartmdphd.com/wtlossfaqs.asp

    <articles about taking pills to suppress appetite snipped>

    >
    >If not, why do you believe such advice should be avoided?


    Simply because the guy doesn't do any type of reading ..

    He believes he can quelch ANY type of discussion which might reflect badly on
    his ability as a physician.

    His seeming 'childish' attempt at quelching the information I provided can be
    seen directly through a search of the groups ..
    Below is the part of my post which was snipped.
    As he states above ..

    <articles about taking pills to suppress appetite snipped>

    which as one can see below is simply .. untrue .. so again either he didn't
    read the articles OR .. he is lying .. to quelch discussion as to his ability
    to UNDERSTAND CRAVING AND ADDICTION ..

    http://www.nytimes.com/2002/02/19/health/19REWA.html


    February 19, 2002

    Hijacking the Brain Circuits With a Nickel Slot Machine

    By SANDRA BLAKESLEE


    ompulsive gambling, attendance at sporting events, vulnerability to
    telephone scams and exuberant investing in the stock market may not seem
    to have much in common. But neuroscientists have uncovered a common
    thread.

    Such behaviors, they say, rely on brain circuits that evolved to help
    animals assess rewards important to their survival, like food and sex.
    Researchers have found that those same circuits are used by the human
    brain to assess social rewards as diverse as investment income and
    surprise home runs at the bottom of the ninth.

    And, in a finding that astonishes many people, they found that the brain
    systems that detect and evaluate such rewards generally operate outside
    of conscious awareness. In navigating the world and deciding what is
    rewarding, humans are closer to zombies than sentient beings much of the
    time.

    The findings, which are gaining wide adherence among neuroscientists,
    challenge the notion that people always make conscious choices about what
    they want and how to obtain it. In fact, the neuroscientists say, much of
    what happens in the brain goes on outside of conscious awareness.

    The idea has been around since Freud, said Dr. Gregory Berns, a
    psychiatrist at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta.
    Psychologists have studied unconscious processing of information in terms
    of subliminal effects, memory and learning, he said, and they have
    started to map out what parts of the brain are involved in such
    processing. But only now are they learning how these different circuits
    interact, he said.

    "My hunch is that most decisions are made subconsciously with many
    gradations of awareness," Dr. Berns said. "For example, I'm vaguely aware
    of how I got to work this morning. But consciousness seems reserved for
    more important things."

    Dr. P. Read Montague, a neuroscientist at Baylor College of Medicine in
    Houston, says the idea that people can get themselves to work on
    automatic pilot raises two questions: how does the brain know what it
    must pay conscious attention to? And how did evolution create a brain
    that could make such distinctions?

    The answer emerging from experiments on animals and people is that the
    brain has evolved to shape itself, starting in infancy, according to what
    it encounters in the external world.

    As Dr. Montague explained it, much of the world is predictable: buildings
    usually stay in one place, gravity makes objects fall, light falling at
    an oblique angle makes long shadows and so forth. As children grow, their
    brains build internal models of everything they encounter, gradually
    learning to identify objects and to predict how they move through space
    and time.

    As new information flows into it from the outside world, the brain
    automatically compares it to what it already knows. If things match up -
    as when people drive to work every day along the same route - events,
    objects and the passage of time may not reach conscious awareness.

    But if there is a surprise - a car suddenly runs a red light - the
    mismatch between what is expected and what is happening instantly shifts
    the brain into a new state. A brain circuit involved in decision making
    is activated, again out of conscious awareness. Drawing on past
    experience held in memory banks, a decision is made: hit the brake,
    swerve the wheel or keep going. Only a second or so later, after hands
    and feet have initiated the chosen action, does the sense of having made
    a conscious decision arise.

    Dr. Montague estimates that 90 percent of what people do every day is
    carried out by this kind of automatic, unconscious system that evolved to
    help creatures survive.

    Animals use these circuits to know what to attend to, what to ignore and
    what is worth learning about. People use them for the same purposes
    which, as a result of their bigger brains and culture, include listening
    to music, eating chocolate, assessing beauty, gambling, investing in
    stocks and experimenting with drugs - all topics that have been studied
    this past year with brain imaging machines that directly measure the
    activity of human brain circuits.

    The two circuits that have been studied most extensively involve how
    animals and people assess rewards. Both involve a chemical called
    dopamine. The first circuit, which is in a middle region of the brain,
    helps animals and people instantly assess rewards or lack of rewards.

    The circuit was described in greater detail several years ago by Dr.
    Wolfram Schultz, a neuroscientist at Cambridge University in England, who
    tracked dopamine production in a monkey's midbrain and experimented with
    various types of rewards, usually squirts of apple juice that the animal
    liked.

    Dr. Schultz found that when the monkey got more juice than it expected,
    dopamine neurons fired vigorously. When the monkey got an amount of juice
    that it expected to get, based on previous squirts, dopamine neurons did
    nothing. And when the monkey expected to get juice but got none, the
    dopamine neurons decreased their firing rate, as if to signal a lack of
    reward.

    Scientists believe that this midbrain dopamine system is constantly
    making predictions about what to expect in terms of rewards. Learning
    takes place only when something unexpected happens and dopamine firing
    rates increase or decrease. When nothing unexpected happens, as when the
    same amount of delicious apple juice keeps coming, the dopamine system is
    quiet.

    In animals, Dr. Montague said, these midbrain dopamine signals are sent
    directly to brain areas that initiate movements and behavior. These brain
    areas figure out how to get more apple juice or sit back and do nothing.
    In humans, though, the dopamine signal is also sent to a higher brain
    region called the frontal cortex for more elaborate processing.

    Dr. Jonathan Cohen, a neuroscientist at Princeton, studies a part of the
    frontal cortex called the anterior cingulate, located in back of the
    forehead. This part of the brain has several functions, Dr. Cohen said,
    including the task of detecting errors and conflict in the flow of
    information being processed automatically.

    Brain imaging experiments are beginning to show that when a person gets
    an unexpected reward - the equivalent of a huge shot of delicious apple
    juice - more dopamine reaches the anterior cingulate. When a person
    expects a reward and does not get it, less dopamine reaches the region.
    And when a person expects a reward and gets it, the anterior cingulate is
    silent.

    When people expect a reward and do not receive it, their brains need a
    way to register the fact that something is amiss so it can recalibrate
    expectations for future events, Dr. Cohen said. As in monkeys, human
    dopamine neurons project to areas that plan and control movements, he
    said. Fluctuating levels of dopamine make people get up and do things,
    outside their conscious awareness. The number of things people do to
    increase their dopamine firing rates is unlimited, neuroscientists are
    discovering. Several studies were published last year looking at monetary
    rewards and dopamine. Money is abstract but to the brain it looks like
    cocaine, food, sex or anything a person expects is rewarding, said Dr.
    Hans Breiter, a neuroscientist at Harvard. People crave it.

    Some people seem to be born with vulnerable dopamine systems that get
    hijacked by social rewards. The same neural circuitry involved in the
    highs and lows of abusing drugs is activated by winning or losing money,
    anticipating a good meal or seeking beautiful faces to look at, Dr.
    Breiter said.

    For example, dopamine circuits are activated by cocaine; people become
    addicted when their reward circuits have been hijacked by the drug, Dr.
    Montague said.

    Winning in gambling can also hijack the dopamine system, Dr. Berns said.
    Many people visit a casino, lose money and are not tempted to go back.
    But compulsive gamblers seem to have vulnerable dopamine systems, he
    said. The first time they win, they get a huge dopamine rush that gets
    embedded in their memory. They keep gambling and the occasional dopamine
    rush of winning overrides their conscious knowledge that they will lose
    in the long run.

    Other experiments show that reward circuits are activated when young men
    look at photos of beautiful women and that these circuits are defective
    in women with eating disorders like bulimia. Bulimics say they are
    addicted to vomiting because it gives them a warm, positive feeling.

    Music activates neural systems of reward and emotion. Older people with
    age-related impairments to the frontal cortex do poorly on gambling tasks
    and, experiments show, are prone to believe misleading advertising.

    Neuroscientists say that part of the appeal of live sporting events is
    their inherent unpredictability. When a baseball player with two outs at
    the bottom of the ninth inning hits a home run to win the game, thousands
    of spectators simultaneously experience a huge surge of dopamine. People
    keep coming back, as if addicted to the euphoria of experiencing
    unexpected rewards.

    One of the most promising areas for looking at unconscious reward
    circuits in human behavior concerns the stock market, Dr. Montague said.
    Economists do not study people, they study collective neural systems in
    people who form mass expectations. For example, when the Federal Reserve
    unexpectedly lowered interest rates twice last year, the market went up,
    he said. When it lowered interest rates on other occasions and investors
    knew the move was coming, markets did not respond.

    Economists and neuroscientists use the same mathematical equations for
    modeling market behavior and dopamine behavior, Dr. Montague said.
    Neuroscience may provide an entirely new set of constructs for
    understanding economic decision making.

    ____________________________________________________________________________


    J Psychoactive Drugs 2000 Nov;32 Suppl:i-iv, 1-112

    Reward deficiency syndrome: a biogenetic model for the diagnosis and treatment
    of impulsive, addictive, and compulsive behaviors.

    Blum K, Braverman ER, Holder JM, Lubar JF, Monastra VJ, Miller D, Lubar JO,
    Chen TJ, Comings DE

    Department of Biological Sciences, University of North Texas, Denton,
    Texas, USA.

    The dopaminergic system, and in particular the dopamine D2 receptor,
    has been implicated in reward mechanisms. The net effect of
    neurotransmitter interaction at the mesolimbic brain region induces
    "reward" when dopamine (DA) is released from the neuron at the nucleus
    accumbens and interacts with a dopamine D2 receptor. "The reward
    cascade" involves the release of serotonin, which in turn at the
    hypothalmus stimulates enkephalin, which in turn inhibits GABA at the
    substania nigra, which in turn fine tunes the amount of DA released at
    the nucleus accumbens or "reward site." It is well known that under
    normal conditions in the reward site DA works to maintain our normal
    drives. In fact, DA has become to be known as the "pleasure molecule"
    and/or the "antistress molecule." When DA is released into the
    synapse, it stimulates a number a DA receptors (D1-D5) which results
    in increased feelings of well-being and stress reduction. A consensus
    of the literature suggests that when there is a dysfunction in the
    brain reward cascade, which could be caused by certain genetic
    variants (polygenic), especially in the DA system causing a
    hypodopaminergic trait, the brain of that person requires a DA fix to
    feel good. This trait leads to multiple drug-seeking behavior. This is
    so because alcohol, cocaine, heroin, marijuana, nicotine, and glucose
    all cause activation and neuronal release of brain DA, which could
    heal the abnormal cravings. Certainly after ten years of study we
    could say with confidence that carriers of the DAD2 receptor A1 allele
    have compromised D2 receptors. Therefore lack of D2 receptors causes
    individuals to have a high risk for multiple addictive, impulsive and
    compulsive behavioral propensities, such as severe alcoholism,
    cocaine, heroin, marijuana and nicotine use, glucose bingeing,
    pathological gambling, sex addiction, ADHD, Tourette's Syndrome,
    autism, chronic violence, posttraumatic stress disorder,
    schizoid/avoidant cluster, conduct disorder and antisocial behavior.
    In order to explain the breakdown of the reward cascade due to both
    multiple genes and environmental stimuli (pleiotropism) and resultant
    aberrant behaviors, Blum united this hypodopaminergic trait under the
    rubric of a reward deficiency syndrome.

    Publication Types:
    * Review
    * Review, academic

    PMID: 11280926, UI: 21177392
    _________________________________________________________________

    Save the above report in [Macintosh] [Text] format
    Order documents on this page through Loansome Doc
    _________________________________________________________________


    Sheng Li Xue Bao 2001 Oct;53(5):334-8

    [Relationship between dopamine and iron contents in the brain of parkinsonian
    rats].

    [Article in Chinese]

    Jiang H, Chen WF, Xie JX

    Medical School of Qingdao University, Qingdao 266021.

    [Medline record in process]

    Using fast cyclic voltammetry (FCV), atomic absorption/flame emission
    spectrophotometry and high performance liquid chromatography for
    electrochemical detection, we studied the change in iron content in
    the substantia nigra (SN) of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesioned
    Parkinsonian (PD) rats and the toxic effect of intranigral injection
    of iron on DA neurons. The neuroprotective effect of desferrioxamine
    mesylate was also observed. The results are as follows. (1) The iron
    content in SN on the lesioned side of 6-OHDA-lesioned PD rats was
    about three times as high as that in unstandard PD rats. (2) The iron
    content in caudate putamen (CPu) on the lesioned side of PD rats was
    not different from that on the unlesioned side. (3) DA release as well
    as the content of DA and its metabolites were significantly decreased
    on the lesioned side of PD rats. (4) In the rats pretreated with
    intracerebroventricular desferrioxamine mesylate before 6-OHDA
    injection, the release and content of DA on the lesioned side were not
    significantly different from those on the unlesioned side. (5)
    Intranigral injection of 40 micrograms FeCl3 resulted in a dramatic
    reduction of both DA release and content in CPu. The above results
    strongly suggest that 6-OHDA reduces the DA release from CPu, in which
    iron plays an important role. Elevation of iron content in SN is one
    of the mechanisms responsible for the reduction of DA content.
    Desferrioxamine mesylate may exert a protective action on dopaminergic
    neurons.

    PMID: 11833414, UI: 21821751
    _________________________________________________________________

    Save the above report in [Macintosh] [Text] format
    Order documents on this page through Loansome Doc
    _________________________________________________________________

    Who loves ya.
    Tom

    Jesus Was A Vegetarian! http://jesuswasavegetarian.7h.com
    Man Is A Herbivore! http://pages.ivillage.com/ironjustice/manisaherbivore
    DEAD PEOPLE WALKING http://pages.ivillage.com/ironjustice/deadpeoplewalking
     
  18. Bill

    Bill Guest

    "doe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > >Subject: Re: Andrew Chung FAQ

    >
    > >> In any case, his medical advice should be avoided, or at least
    > >> verified by one's own physician.

    > >
    > >Actually, from what I have seen his advice has been quite knowledgeable and
    > >helpful. Two pound diet issues aside - which seems to inflame a lot of
    > >passion - can you provide some examples, or any example for that matter, of
    > >medical information that he has provided that is factually incorrect?

    >
    > http://www.google.com/groups?q=g:thl3147059742d&dq=&hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&sel
    > m=20030830135620.14517.00000240%40mb-m12.aol.com
    >
    > Below is a snip from his response to my question above in the groups as to

    his
    > seemingly cavalier attitude to the PROBLEM .. of .. craving / addiction to
    > food.
    > As you can see by the parts of my post he 'snipped' .. nothing at all was

    said
    > about using pills to control diet .
    > He either didn't read the post OR purposely lied ..
    >
    > Either way .. as a physician one could / should / would expect MORE of a
    > 'professional' attitude .. IF ..he were truly a medical professional.
    >
    >
    > wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    > > (3) If you feel hungry between meals, try drinking some water instead of
    > > snacking. Also, doing things like your favorite hobbies or socializing can

    > get
    > > your mind off of eating.
    > >
    > > Spoken like a true doctor ..

    >
    > That's what I am. The alternative would be to swallow an appetite
    > suppressing pill. Your choice.
    >
    > > "it's all in your head .."

    >
    > Sorry, the stomach is not in the head.
    >
    > > So your advice to someone who has food cravings is .. " bite the bullet

    ..."
    > ..
    > > ?

    >
    > Nope. It is wait till supper. However, if you do snack, do keep
    > track of it per the 2PD instructions at:
    >
    > http://www.heartmdphd.com/wtloss.asp
    >
    > > One would think addressing the underlying cause OF .. craving .. might be

    in
    > > order ..?

    >
    > see:
    >
    > http://www.heartmdphd.com/wtlossfaqs.asp
    >
    > <articles about taking pills to suppress appetite snipped>
    >
    > >
    > >If not, why do you believe such advice should be avoided?

    >
    > Simply because the guy doesn't do any type of reading ..
    >
    > He believes he can quelch ANY type of discussion which might reflect badly

    on
    > his ability as a physician.
    >
    > His seeming 'childish' attempt at quelching the information I provided can

    be
    > seen directly through a search of the groups ..
    > Below is the part of my post which was snipped.
    > As he states above ..
    >
    > <articles about taking pills to suppress appetite snipped>
    >
    > which as one can see below is simply .. untrue .. so again either he didn't
    > read the articles OR .. he is lying .. to quelch discussion as to his

    ability
    > to UNDERSTAND CRAVING AND ADDICTION ..
    >
    > http://www.nytimes.com/2002/02/19/health/19REWA.html
    >
    >
    > February 19, 2002
    >
    > Hijacking the Brain Circuits With a Nickel Slot Machine
    >
    > By SANDRA BLAKESLEE
    >
    >
    > ompulsive gambling, attendance at sporting events, vulnerability to
    > telephone scams and exuberant investing in the stock market may not seem
    > to have much in common. But neuroscientists have uncovered a common
    > thread.
    >
    > Such behaviors, they say, rely on brain circuits that evolved to help
    > animals assess rewards important to their survival, like food and sex.
    > Researchers have found that those same circuits are used by the human
    > brain to assess social rewards as diverse as investment income and
    > surprise home runs at the bottom of the ninth.
    >
    > And, in a finding that astonishes many people, they found that the brain
    > systems that detect and evaluate such rewards generally operate outside
    > of conscious awareness. In navigating the world and deciding what is
    > rewarding, humans are closer to zombies than sentient beings much of the
    > time.
    >
    > The findings, which are gaining wide adherence among neuroscientists,
    > challenge the notion that people always make conscious choices about what
    > they want and how to obtain it. In fact, the neuroscientists say, much of
    > what happens in the brain goes on outside of conscious awareness.
    >
    > The idea has been around since Freud, said Dr. Gregory Berns, a
    > psychiatrist at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta.
    > Psychologists have studied unconscious processing of information in terms
    > of subliminal effects, memory and learning, he said, and they have
    > started to map out what parts of the brain are involved in such
    > processing. But only now are they learning how these different circuits
    > interact, he said.
    >
    > "My hunch is that most decisions are made subconsciously with many
    > gradations of awareness," Dr. Berns said. "For example, I'm vaguely aware
    > of how I got to work this morning. But consciousness seems reserved for
    > more important things."
    >
    > Dr. P. Read Montague, a neuroscientist at Baylor College of Medicine in
    > Houston, says the idea that people can get themselves to work on
    > automatic pilot raises two questions: how does the brain know what it
    > must pay conscious attention to? And how did evolution create a brain
    > that could make such distinctions?
    >
    > The answer emerging from experiments on animals and people is that the
    > brain has evolved to shape itself, starting in infancy, according to what
    > it encounters in the external world.
    >
    > As Dr. Montague explained it, much of the world is predictable: buildings
    > usually stay in one place, gravity makes objects fall, light falling at
    > an oblique angle makes long shadows and so forth. As children grow, their
    > brains build internal models of everything they encounter, gradually
    > learning to identify objects and to predict how they move through space
    > and time.
    >
    > As new information flows into it from the outside world, the brain
    > automatically compares it to what it already knows. If things match up -
    > as when people drive to work every day along the same route - events,
    > objects and the passage of time may not reach conscious awareness.
    >
    > But if there is a surprise - a car suddenly runs a red light - the
    > mismatch between what is expected and what is happening instantly shifts
    > the brain into a new state. A brain circuit involved in decision making
    > is activated, again out of conscious awareness. Drawing on past
    > experience held in memory banks, a decision is made: hit the brake,
    > swerve the wheel or keep going. Only a second or so later, after hands
    > and feet have initiated the chosen action, does the sense of having made
    > a conscious decision arise.
    >
    > Dr. Montague estimates that 90 percent of what people do every day is
    > carried out by this kind of automatic, unconscious system that evolved to
    > help creatures survive.
    >
    > Animals use these circuits to know what to attend to, what to ignore and
    > what is worth learning about. People use them for the same purposes
    > which, as a result of their bigger brains and culture, include listening
    > to music, eating chocolate, assessing beauty, gambling, investing in
    > stocks and experimenting with drugs - all topics that have been studied
    > this past year with brain imaging machines that directly measure the
    > activity of human brain circuits.
    >
    > The two circuits that have been studied most extensively involve how
    > animals and people assess rewards. Both involve a chemical called
    > dopamine. The first circuit, which is in a middle region of the brain,
    > helps animals and people instantly assess rewards or lack of rewards.
    >
    > The circuit was described in greater detail several years ago by Dr.
    > Wolfram Schultz, a neuroscientist at Cambridge University in England, who
    > tracked dopamine production in a monkey's midbrain and experimented with
    > various types of rewards, usually squirts of apple juice that the animal
    > liked.
    >
    > Dr. Schultz found that when the monkey got more juice than it expected,
    > dopamine neurons fired vigorously. When the monkey got an amount of juice
    > that it expected to get, based on previous squirts, dopamine neurons did
    > nothing. And when the monkey expected to get juice but got none, the
    > dopamine neurons decreased their firing rate, as if to signal a lack of
    > reward.
    >
    > Scientists believe that this midbrain dopamine system is constantly
    > making predictions about what to expect in terms of rewards. Learning
    > takes place only when something unexpected happens and dopamine firing
    > rates increase or decrease. When nothing unexpected happens, as when the
    > same amount of delicious apple juice keeps coming, the dopamine system is
    > quiet.
    >
    > In animals, Dr. Montague said, these midbrain dopamine signals are sent
    > directly to brain areas that initiate movements and behavior. These brain
    > areas figure out how to get more apple juice or sit back and do nothing.
    > In humans, though, the dopamine signal is also sent to a higher brain
    > region called the frontal cortex for more elaborate processing.
    >
    > Dr. Jonathan Cohen, a neuroscientist at Princeton, studies a part of the
    > frontal cortex called the anterior cingulate, located in back of the
    > forehead. This part of the brain has several functions, Dr. Cohen said,
    > including the task of detecting errors and conflict in the flow of
    > information being processed automatically.
    >
    > Brain imaging experiments are beginning to show that when a person gets
    > an unexpected reward - the equivalent of a huge shot of delicious apple
    > juice - more dopamine reaches the anterior cingulate. When a person
    > expects a reward and does not get it, less dopamine reaches the region.
    > And when a person expects a reward and gets it, the anterior cingulate is
    > silent.
    >
    > When people expect a reward and do not receive it, their brains need a
    > way to register the fact that something is amiss so it can recalibrate
    > expectations for future events, Dr. Cohen said. As in monkeys, human
    > dopamine neurons project to areas that plan and control movements, he
    > said. Fluctuating levels of dopamine make people get up and do things,
    > outside their conscious awareness. The number of things people do to
    > increase their dopamine firing rates is unlimited, neuroscientists are
    > discovering. Several studies were published last year looking at monetary
    > rewards and dopamine. Money is abstract but to the brain it looks like
    > cocaine, food, sex or anything a person expects is rewarding, said Dr.
    > Hans Breiter, a neuroscientist at Harvard. People crave it.
    >
    > Some people seem to be born with vulnerable dopamine systems that get
    > hijacked by social rewards. The same neural circuitry involved in the
    > highs and lows of abusing drugs is activated by winning or losing money,
    > anticipating a good meal or seeking beautiful faces to look at, Dr.
    > Breiter said.
    >
    > For example, dopamine circuits are activated by cocaine; people become
    > addicted when their reward circuits have been hijacked by the drug, Dr.
    > Montague said.
    >
    > Winning in gambling can also hijack the dopamine system, Dr. Berns said.
    > Many people visit a casino, lose money and are not tempted to go back.
    > But compulsive gamblers seem to have vulnerable dopamine systems, he
    > said. The first time they win, they get a huge dopamine rush that gets
    > embedded in their memory. They keep gambling and the occasional dopamine
    > rush of winning overrides their conscious knowledge that they will lose
    > in the long run.
    >
    > Other experiments show that reward circuits are activated when young men
    > look at photos of beautiful women and that these circuits are defective
    > in women with eating disorders like bulimia. Bulimics say they are
    > addicted to vomiting because it gives them a warm, positive feeling.
    >
    > Music activates neural systems of reward and emotion. Older people with
    > age-related impairments to the frontal cortex do poorly on gambling tasks
    > and, experiments show, are prone to believe misleading advertising.
    >
    > Neuroscientists say that part of the appeal of live sporting events is
    > their inherent unpredictability. When a baseball player with two outs at
    > the bottom of the ninth inning hits a home run to win the game, thousands
    > of spectators simultaneously experience a huge surge of dopamine. People
    > keep coming back, as if addicted to the euphoria of experiencing
    > unexpected rewards.
    >
    > One of the most promising areas for looking at unconscious reward
    > circuits in human behavior concerns the stock market, Dr. Montague said.
    > Economists do not study people, they study collective neural systems in
    > people who form mass expectations. For example, when the Federal Reserve
    > unexpectedly lowered interest rates twice last year, the market went up,
    > he said. When it lowered interest rates on other occasions and investors
    > knew the move was coming, markets did not respond.
    >
    > Economists and neuroscientists use the same mathematical equations for
    > modeling market behavior and dopamine behavior, Dr. Montague said.
    > Neuroscience may provide an entirely new set of constructs for
    > understanding economic decision making.
    >
    > ____________________________________________________________________________
    >
    >
    > J Psychoactive Drugs 2000 Nov;32 Suppl:i-iv, 1-112
    >
    > Reward deficiency syndrome: a biogenetic model for the diagnosis and

    treatment
    > of impulsive, addictive, and compulsive behaviors.
    >
    > Blum K, Braverman ER, Holder JM, Lubar JF, Monastra VJ, Miller D, Lubar

    JO,
    > Chen TJ, Comings DE
    >
    > Department of Biological Sciences, University of North Texas, Denton,
    > Texas, USA.
    >
    > The dopaminergic system, and in particular the dopamine D2 receptor,
    > has been implicated in reward mechanisms. The net effect of
    > neurotransmitter interaction at the mesolimbic brain region induces
    > "reward" when dopamine (DA) is released from the neuron at the nucleus
    > accumbens and interacts with a dopamine D2 receptor. "The reward
    > cascade" involves the release of serotonin, which in turn at the
    > hypothalmus stimulates enkephalin, which in turn inhibits GABA at the
    > substania nigra, which in turn fine tunes the amount of DA released at
    > the nucleus accumbens or "reward site." It is well known that under
    > normal conditions in the reward site DA works to maintain our normal
    > drives. In fact, DA has become to be known as the "pleasure molecule"
    > and/or the "antistress molecule." When DA is released into the
    > synapse, it stimulates a number a DA receptors (D1-D5) which results
    > in increased feelings of well-being and stress reduction. A consensus
    > of the literature suggests that when there is a dysfunction in the
    > brain reward cascade, which could be caused by certain genetic
    > variants (polygenic), especially in the DA system causing a
    > hypodopaminergic trait, the brain of that person requires a DA fix to
    > feel good. This trait leads to multiple drug-seeking behavior. This is
    > so because alcohol, cocaine, heroin, marijuana, nicotine, and glucose
    > all cause activation and neuronal release of brain DA, which could
    > heal the abnormal cravings. Certainly after ten years of study we
    > could say with confidence that carriers of the DAD2 receptor A1 allele
    > have compromised D2 receptors. Therefore lack of D2 receptors causes
    > individuals to have a high risk for multiple addictive, impulsive and
    > compulsive behavioral propensities, such as severe alcoholism,
    > cocaine, heroin, marijuana and nicotine use, glucose bingeing,
    > pathological gambling, sex addiction, ADHD, Tourette's Syndrome,
    > autism, chronic violence, posttraumatic stress disorder,
    > schizoid/avoidant cluster, conduct disorder and antisocial behavior.
    > In order to explain the breakdown of the reward cascade due to both
    > multiple genes and environmental stimuli (pleiotropism) and resultant
    > aberrant behaviors, Blum united this hypodopaminergic trait under the
    > rubric of a reward deficiency syndrome.
    >
    > Publication Types:
    > * Review
    > * Review, academic
    >
    > PMID: 11280926, UI: 21177392
    > _________________________________________________________________
    >
    > Save the above report in [Macintosh] [Text] format
    > Order documents on this page through Loansome Doc
    > _________________________________________________________________
    >
    >
    > Sheng Li Xue Bao 2001 Oct;53(5):334-8
    >
    > [Relationship between dopamine and iron contents in the brain of

    parkinsonian
    > rats].
    >
    > [Article in Chinese]
    >
    > Jiang H, Chen WF, Xie JX
    >
    > Medical School of Qingdao University, Qingdao 266021.
    >
    > [Medline record in process]
    >
    > Using fast cyclic voltammetry (FCV), atomic absorption/flame emission
    > spectrophotometry and high performance liquid chromatography for
    > electrochemical detection, we studied the change in iron content in
    > the substantia nigra (SN) of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesioned
    > Parkinsonian (PD) rats and the toxic effect of intranigral injection
    > of iron on DA neurons. The neuroprotective effect of desferrioxamine
    > mesylate was also observed. The results are as follows. (1) The iron
    > content in SN on the lesioned side of 6-OHDA-lesioned PD rats was
    > about three times as high as that in unstandard PD rats. (2) The iron
    > content in caudate putamen (CPu) on the lesioned side of PD rats was
    > not different from that on the unlesioned side. (3) DA release as well
    > as the content of DA and its metabolites were significantly decreased
    > on the lesioned side of PD rats. (4) In the rats pretreated with
    > intracerebroventricular desferrioxamine mesylate before 6-OHDA
    > injection, the release and content of DA on the lesioned side were not
    > significantly different from those on the unlesioned side. (5)
    > Intranigral injection of 40 micrograms FeCl3 resulted in a dramatic
    > reduction of both DA release and content in CPu. The above results
    > strongly suggest that 6-OHDA reduces the DA release from CPu, in which
    > iron plays an important role. Elevation of iron content in SN is one
    > of the mechanisms responsible for the reduction of DA content.
    > Desferrioxamine mesylate may exert a protective action on dopaminergic
    > neurons.
    >
    > PMID: 11833414, UI: 21821751
    > _________________________________________________________________
    >
    > Save the above report in [Macintosh] [Text] format
    > Order documents on this page through Loansome Doc
    > _________________________________________________________________
    >
    > Who loves ya.
    > Tom
    >
    > Jesus Was A Vegetarian! http://jesuswasavegetarian.7h.com
    > Man Is A Herbivore! http://pages.ivillage.com/ironjustice/manisaherbivore
    > DEAD PEOPLE WALKING http://pages.ivillage.com/ironjustice/deadpeoplewalking
    >
    >
    >


    You did not read my original post or did not pay attention to it. I
    specifically requested that 2 pound diet issues be put asside - because it
    inflames such passion - and that someone bring up ANY other piece of medical
    information/advice that he has given out here that is factually incorrect.

    So the request/challenge remains.

    Bill
     
  19. Bigjon

    Bigjon Guest

    Bill declared:


    > "Bill" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >>
    >> "Harold McNamara" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >>> An individual who purports to be a board-certified cardiologist with
    >>> an international reputation has been regularly posting to this and
    >>> other health-oriented newsgroups over the last several years. The
    >>> posts have been under the name Andrew Chung, with an originating
    >>> domain of heartmdphd.com and (before that), emory.edu.
    >>>
    >>> Other names that this individual has apparently used include Michael
    >>> Roose and "MU".
    >>>
    >>> The posts have the following characteristics:
    >>>
    >>> 1. They dispense medical advice on heart disease, diabetes, and
    >>> weight-loss.
    >>> 2. They are often off-topic, and are cross-posted freely.
    >>> 3. They frequently contain threats of legal action for "libel",
    >>> usually when someone else disagrees with Chung's views.
    >>>
    >>> There is an Andrew Chung who resides in the Atlanta area, living in a
    >>> rather seedy suburb of Atlanta. This indiviudal is unaffiliated with
    >>> any hospitals in the area, making it extremely unlikely that he has an
    >>> active medical practice.
    >>>
    >>> There is also a Web site, www.heartmdphd.com, that contains a great
    >>> deal of self-serving information concerning Andrew Chung, and also
    >>> features a so-called cyberstalking section that hosts insults directed
    >>> at those who have criticized Chung's on-line articles hyping his
    >>> "two-pound" diet and other recommended treatments.
    >>>
    >>> In all likelihood Dr. Chung is at worst a quack and at best a lonely
    >>> and isolated individual who compensates for a feeling of failure and
    >>> emptiness with his online shenanigans.
    >>>
    >>> In any case, his medical advice should be avoided, or at least
    >>> verified by one's own physician.

    >>
    >> Actually, from what I have seen his advice has been quite knowledgeable and
    >> helpful. Two pound diet issues aside - which seems to inflame a lot of
    >> passion - can you provide some examples, or any example for that matter, of
    >> medical information that he has provided that is factually incorrect?
    >>
    >> If not, why do you believe such advice should be avoided?
    >>
    >> Bill
    >>
    >>


    > You guys can argue back and forth. I am still waiting for the orignal poster
    > to provide the evidence outlined above to support his claim.


    > Bill


    He never will, because he is a troll
    --
    You can't have it all -
    Where would you put it ?
     
  20. doe

    doe Guest


    >Date: 8/31/2003 3:07 PM Mountain Daylight Time
    >Message-id: <[email protected]>
    >
    >
    >"doe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    >> >Subject: Re: Andrew Chung FAQ

    >>
    >> >> In any case, his medical advice should be avoided, or at least
    >> >> verified by one's own physician.
    >> >
    >> >Actually, from what I have seen his advice has been quite knowledgeable

    >and
    >> >helpful. Two pound diet issues aside - which seems to inflame a lot of
    >> >passion - can you provide some examples, or any example for that matter,

    >of
    >> >medical information that he has provided that is factually incorrect?

    >>
    >> http://www.google.com/groups?q=g:thl3147059742d&dq=&hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&sel
    >> m=20030830135620.14517.00000240%40mb-m12.aol.com
    >>
    >> Below is a snip from his response to my question above in the groups as to

    >his
    >> seemingly cavalier attitude to the PROBLEM .. of .. craving / addiction to
    >> food.
    >> As you can see by the parts of my post he 'snipped' .. nothing at all was

    >said
    >> about using pills to control diet .
    >> He either didn't read the post OR purposely lied ..
    >>
    >> Either way .. as a physician one could / should / would expect MORE of a
    >> 'professional' attitude .. IF ..he were truly a medical professional.
    >>
    >>
    >> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    >>
    >> > (3) If you feel hungry between meals, try drinking some water instead of
    >> > snacking. Also, doing things like your favorite hobbies or socializing

    >can
    >> get
    >> > your mind off of eating.
    >> >
    >> > Spoken like a true doctor ..

    >>
    >> That's what I am. The alternative would be to swallow an appetite
    >> suppressing pill. Your choice.
    >>
    >> > "it's all in your head .."

    >>
    >> Sorry, the stomach is not in the head.
    >>
    >> > So your advice to someone who has food cravings is .. " bite the bullet

    >.."
    >> ..
    >> > ?

    >>
    >> Nope. It is wait till supper. However, if you do snack, do keep
    >> track of it per the 2PD instructions at:
    >>
    >> http://www.heartmdphd.com/wtloss.asp
    >>
    >> > One would think addressing the underlying cause OF .. craving .. might be

    >in
    >> > order ..?

    >>
    >> see:
    >>
    >> http://www.heartmdphd.com/wtlossfaqs.asp
    >>
    >> <articles about taking pills to suppress appetite snipped>
    >>
    >> >
    >> >If not, why do you believe such advice should be avoided?

    >>
    >> Simply because the guy doesn't do any type of reading ..
    >>
    >> He believes he can quelch ANY type of discussion which might reflect badly

    >on
    >> his ability as a physician.
    >>
    >> His seeming 'childish' attempt at quelching the information I provided can

    >be
    >> seen directly through a search of the groups ..
    >> Below is the part of my post which was snipped.
    >> As he states above ..
    >>
    >> <articles about taking pills to suppress appetite snipped>
    >>
    >> which as one can see below is simply .. untrue .. so again either he didn't
    >> read the articles OR .. he is lying .. to quelch discussion as to his

    >ability
    >> to UNDERSTAND CRAVING AND ADDICTION ..
    >>
    >> http://www.nytimes.com/2002/02/19/health/19REWA.html
    >>
    >>
    >> February 19, 2002
    >>
    >> Hijacking the Brain Circuits With a Nickel Slot Machine
    >>
    >> By SANDRA BLAKESLEE
    >>
    >>
    >> ompulsive gambling, attendance at sporting events, vulnerability to
    >> telephone scams and exuberant investing in the stock market may not seem
    >> to have much in common. But neuroscientists have uncovered a common
    >> thread.
    >>
    >> Such behaviors, they say, rely on brain circuits that evolved to help
    >> animals assess rewards important to their survival, like food and sex.
    >> Researchers have found that those same circuits are used by the human
    >> brain to assess social rewards as diverse as investment income and
    >> surprise home runs at the bottom of the ninth.
    >>
    >> And, in a finding that astonishes many people, they found that the brain
    >> systems that detect and evaluate such rewards generally operate outside
    >> of conscious awareness. In navigating the world and deciding what is
    >> rewarding, humans are closer to zombies than sentient beings much of the
    >> time.
    >>
    >> The findings, which are gaining wide adherence among neuroscientists,
    >> challenge the notion that people always make conscious choices about what
    >> they want and how to obtain it. In fact, the neuroscientists say, much of
    >> what happens in the brain goes on outside of conscious awareness.
    >>
    >> The idea has been around since Freud, said Dr. Gregory Berns, a
    >> psychiatrist at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta.
    >> Psychologists have studied unconscious processing of information in terms
    >> of subliminal effects, memory and learning, he said, and they have
    >> started to map out what parts of the brain are involved in such
    >> processing. But only now are they learning how these different circuits
    >> interact, he said.
    >>
    >> "My hunch is that most decisions are made subconsciously with many
    >> gradations of awareness," Dr. Berns said. "For example, I'm vaguely aware
    >> of how I got to work this morning. But consciousness seems reserved for
    >> more important things."
    >>
    >> Dr. P. Read Montague, a neuroscientist at Baylor College of Medicine in
    >> Houston, says the idea that people can get themselves to work on
    >> automatic pilot raises two questions: how does the brain know what it
    >> must pay conscious attention to? And how did evolution create a brain
    >> that could make such distinctions?
    >>
    >> The answer emerging from experiments on animals and people is that the
    >> brain has evolved to shape itself, starting in infancy, according to what
    >> it encounters in the external world.
    >>
    >> As Dr. Montague explained it, much of the world is predictable: buildings
    >> usually stay in one place, gravity makes objects fall, light falling at
    >> an oblique angle makes long shadows and so forth. As children grow, their
    >> brains build internal models of everything they encounter, gradually
    >> learning to identify objects and to predict how they move through space
    >> and time.
    >>
    >> As new information flows into it from the outside world, the brain
    >> automatically compares it to what it already knows. If things match up -
    >> as when people drive to work every day along the same route - events,
    >> objects and the passage of time may not reach conscious awareness.
    >>
    >> But if there is a surprise - a car suddenly runs a red light - the
    >> mismatch between what is expected and what is happening instantly shifts
    >> the brain into a new state. A brain circuit involved in decision making
    >> is activated, again out of conscious awareness. Drawing on past
    >> experience held in memory banks, a decision is made: hit the brake,
    >> swerve the wheel or keep going. Only a second or so later, after hands
    >> and feet have initiated the chosen action, does the sense of having made
    >> a conscious decision arise.
    >>
    >> Dr. Montague estimates that 90 percent of what people do every day is
    >> carried out by this kind of automatic, unconscious system that evolved to
    >> help creatures survive.
    >>
    >> Animals use these circuits to know what to attend to, what to ignore and
    >> what is worth learning about. People use them for the same purposes
    >> which, as a result of their bigger brains and culture, include listening
    >> to music, eating chocolate, assessing beauty, gambling, investing in
    >> stocks and experimenting with drugs - all topics that have been studied
    >> this past year with brain imaging machines that directly measure the
    >> activity of human brain circuits.
    >>
    >> The two circuits that have been studied most extensively involve how
    >> animals and people assess rewards. Both involve a chemical called
    >> dopamine. The first circuit, which is in a middle region of the brain,
    >> helps animals and people instantly assess rewards or lack of rewards.
    >>
    >> The circuit was described in greater detail several years ago by Dr.
    >> Wolfram Schultz, a neuroscientist at Cambridge University in England, who
    >> tracked dopamine production in a monkey's midbrain and experimented with
    >> various types of rewards, usually squirts of apple juice that the animal
    >> liked.
    >>
    >> Dr. Schultz found that when the monkey got more juice than it expected,
    >> dopamine neurons fired vigorously. When the monkey got an amount of juice
    >> that it expected to get, based on previous squirts, dopamine neurons did
    >> nothing. And when the monkey expected to get juice but got none, the
    >> dopamine neurons decreased their firing rate, as if to signal a lack of
    >> reward.
    >>
    >> Scientists believe that this midbrain dopamine system is constantly
    >> making predictions about what to expect in terms of rewards. Learning
    >> takes place only when something unexpected happens and dopamine firing
    >> rates increase or decrease. When nothing unexpected happens, as when the
    >> same amount of delicious apple juice keeps coming, the dopamine system is
    >> quiet.
    >>
    >> In animals, Dr. Montague said, these midbrain dopamine signals are sent
    >> directly to brain areas that initiate movements and behavior. These brain
    >> areas figure out how to get more apple juice or sit back and do nothing.
    >> In humans, though, the dopamine signal is also sent to a higher brain
    >> region called the frontal cortex for more elaborate processing.
    >>
    >> Dr. Jonathan Cohen, a neuroscientist at Princeton, studies a part of the
    >> frontal cortex called the anterior cingulate, located in back of the
    >> forehead. This part of the brain has several functions, Dr. Cohen said,
    >> including the task of detecting errors and conflict in the flow of
    >> information being processed automatically.
    >>
    >> Brain imaging experiments are beginning to show that when a person gets
    >> an unexpected reward - the equivalent of a huge shot of delicious apple
    >> juice - more dopamine reaches the anterior cingulate. When a person
    >> expects a reward and does not get it, less dopamine reaches the region.
    >> And when a person expects a reward and gets it, the anterior cingulate is
    >> silent.
    >>
    >> When people expect a reward and do not receive it, their brains need a
    >> way to register the fact that something is amiss so it can recalibrate
    >> expectations for future events, Dr. Cohen said. As in monkeys, human
    >> dopamine neurons project to areas that plan and control movements, he
    >> said. Fluctuating levels of dopamine make people get up and do things,
    >> outside their conscious awareness. The number of things people do to
    >> increase their dopamine firing rates is unlimited, neuroscientists are
    >> discovering. Several studies were published last year looking at monetary
    >> rewards and dopamine. Money is abstract but to the brain it looks like
    >> cocaine, food, sex or anything a person expects is rewarding, said Dr.
    >> Hans Breiter, a neuroscientist at Harvard. People crave it.
    >>
    >> Some people seem to be born with vulnerable dopamine systems that get
    >> hijacked by social rewards. The same neural circuitry involved in the
    >> highs and lows of abusing drugs is activated by winning or losing money,
    >> anticipating a good meal or seeking beautiful faces to look at, Dr.
    >> Breiter said.
    >>
    >> For example, dopamine circuits are activated by cocaine; people become
    >> addicted when their reward circuits have been hijacked by the drug, Dr.
    >> Montague said.
    >>
    >> Winning in gambling can also hijack the dopamine system, Dr. Berns said.
    >> Many people visit a casino, lose money and are not tempted to go back.
    >> But compulsive gamblers seem to have vulnerable dopamine systems, he
    >> said. The first time they win, they get a huge dopamine rush that gets
    >> embedded in their memory. They keep gambling and the occasional dopamine
    >> rush of winning overrides their conscious knowledge that they will lose
    >> in the long run.
    >>
    >> Other experiments show that reward circuits are activated when young men
    >> look at photos of beautiful women and that these circuits are defective
    >> in women with eating disorders like bulimia. Bulimics say they are
    >> addicted to vomiting because it gives them a warm, positive feeling.
    >>
    >> Music activates neural systems of reward and emotion. Older people with
    >> age-related impairments to the frontal cortex do poorly on gambling tasks
    >> and, experiments show, are prone to believe misleading advertising.
    >>
    >> Neuroscientists say that part of the appeal of live sporting events is
    >> their inherent unpredictability. When a baseball player with two outs at
    >> the bottom of the ninth inning hits a home run to win the game, thousands
    >> of spectators simultaneously experience a huge surge of dopamine. People
    >> keep coming back, as if addicted to the euphoria of experiencing
    >> unexpected rewards.
    >>
    >> One of the most promising areas for looking at unconscious reward
    >> circuits in human behavior concerns the stock market, Dr. Montague said.
    >> Economists do not study people, they study collective neural systems in
    >> people who form mass expectations. For example, when the Federal Reserve
    >> unexpectedly lowered interest rates twice last year, the market went up,
    >> he said. When it lowered interest rates on other occasions and investors
    >> knew the move was coming, markets did not respond.
    >>
    >> Economists and neuroscientists use the same mathematical equations for
    >> modeling market behavior and dopamine behavior, Dr. Montague said.
    >> Neuroscience may provide an entirely new set of constructs for
    >> understanding economic decision making.
    >>
    >>

    >____________________________________________________________________________
    >>
    >>
    >> J Psychoactive Drugs 2000 Nov;32 Suppl:i-iv, 1-112
    >>
    >> Reward deficiency syndrome: a biogenetic model for the diagnosis and

    >treatment
    >> of impulsive, addictive, and compulsive behaviors.
    >>
    >> Blum K, Braverman ER, Holder JM, Lubar JF, Monastra VJ, Miller D, Lubar

    >JO,
    >> Chen TJ, Comings DE
    >>
    >> Department of Biological Sciences, University of North Texas, Denton,
    >> Texas, USA.
    >>
    >> The dopaminergic system, and in particular the dopamine D2 receptor,
    >> has been implicated in reward mechanisms. The net effect of
    >> neurotransmitter interaction at the mesolimbic brain region induces
    >> "reward" when dopamine (DA) is released from the neuron at the nucleus
    >> accumbens and interacts with a dopamine D2 receptor. "The reward
    >> cascade" involves the release of serotonin, which in turn at the
    >> hypothalmus stimulates enkephalin, which in turn inhibits GABA at the
    >> substania nigra, which in turn fine tunes the amount of DA released at
    >> the nucleus accumbens or "reward site." It is well known that under
    >> normal conditions in the reward site DA works to maintain our normal
    >> drives. In fact, DA has become to be known as the "pleasure molecule"
    >> and/or the "antistress molecule." When DA is released into the
    >> synapse, it stimulates a number a DA receptors (D1-D5) which results
    >> in increased feelings of well-being and stress reduction. A consensus
    >> of the literature suggests that when there is a dysfunction in the
    >> brain reward cascade, which could be caused by certain genetic
    >> variants (polygenic), especially in the DA system causing a
    >> hypodopaminergic trait, the brain of that person requires a DA fix to
    >> feel good. This trait leads to multiple drug-seeking behavior. This is
    >> so because alcohol, cocaine, heroin, marijuana, nicotine, and glucose
    >> all cause activation and neuronal release of brain DA, which could
    >> heal the abnormal cravings. Certainly after ten years of study we
    >> could say with confidence that carriers of the DAD2 receptor A1 allele
    >> have compromised D2 receptors. Therefore lack of D2 receptors causes
    >> individuals to have a high risk for multiple addictive, impulsive and
    >> compulsive behavioral propensities, such as severe alcoholism,
    >> cocaine, heroin, marijuana and nicotine use, glucose bingeing,
    >> pathological gambling, sex addiction, ADHD, Tourette's Syndrome,
    >> autism, chronic violence, posttraumatic stress disorder,
    >> schizoid/avoidant cluster, conduct disorder and antisocial behavior.
    >> In order to explain the breakdown of the reward cascade due to both
    >> multiple genes and environmental stimuli (pleiotropism) and resultant
    >> aberrant behaviors, Blum united this hypodopaminergic trait under the
    >> rubric of a reward deficiency syndrome.
    >>
    >> Publication Types:
    >> * Review
    >> * Review, academic
    >>
    >> PMID: 11280926, UI: 21177392
    >> _________________________________________________________________
    >>
    >> Save the above report in [Macintosh] [Text] format
    >> Order documents on this page through Loansome Doc
    >> _________________________________________________________________
    >>
    >>
    >> Sheng Li Xue Bao 2001 Oct;53(5):334-8
    >>
    >> [Relationship between dopamine and iron contents in the brain of

    >parkinsonian
    >> rats].
    >>
    >> [Article in Chinese]
    >>
    >> Jiang H, Chen WF, Xie JX
    >>
    >> Medical School of Qingdao University, Qingdao 266021.
    >>
    >> [Medline record in process]
    >>
    >> Using fast cyclic voltammetry (FCV), atomic absorption/flame emission
    >> spectrophotometry and high performance liquid chromatography for
    >> electrochemical detection, we studied the change in iron content in
    >> the substantia nigra (SN) of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesioned
    >> Parkinsonian (PD) rats and the toxic effect of intranigral injection
    >> of iron on DA neurons. The neuroprotective effect of desferrioxamine
    >> mesylate was also observed. The results are as follows. (1) The iron
    >> content in SN on the lesioned side of 6-OHDA-lesioned PD rats was
    >> about three times as high as that in unstandard PD rats. (2) The iron
    >> content in caudate putamen (CPu) on the lesioned side of PD rats was
    >> not different from that on the unlesioned side. (3) DA release as well
    >> as the content of DA and its metabolites were significantly decreased
    >> on the lesioned side of PD rats. (4) In the rats pretreated with
    >> intracerebroventricular desferrioxamine mesylate before 6-OHDA
    >> injection, the release and content of DA on the lesioned side were not
    >> significantly different from those on the unlesioned side. (5)
    >> Intranigral injection of 40 micrograms FeCl3 resulted in a dramatic
    >> reduction of both DA release and content in CPu. The above results
    >> strongly suggest that 6-OHDA reduces the DA release from CPu, in which
    >> iron plays an important role. Elevation of iron content in SN is one
    >> of the mechanisms responsible for the reduction of DA content.
    >> Desferrioxamine mesylate may exert a protective action on dopaminergic
    >> neurons.
    >>
    >> PMID: 11833414, UI: 21821751
    >> _________________________________________________________________
    >>
    >> Save the above report in [Macintosh] [Text] format
    >> Order documents on this page through Loansome Doc
    >> _________________________________________________________________
    >>
    >> Who loves ya.
    >> Tom
    >>
    >> Jesus Was A Vegetarian! http://jesuswasavegetarian.7h.com
    >> Man Is A Herbivore! http://pages.ivillage.com/ironjustice/manisaherbivore
    >> DEAD PEOPLE WALKING http://pages.ivillage.com/ironjustice/deadpeoplewalking
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    >You did not read my original post or did not pay attention to it. I
    >specifically requested that 2 pound diet issues be put asside - because it
    >inflames such passion - and that someone bring up ANY other piece of medical
    >information/advice that he has given out here that is factually incorrect.


    I wasn't questioning ANYTHING about his '
    two pound diet' .. specifically .. just his 'take' on the ability to 'control
    cravings' .. which IS part and parcel of medical advice.

    His medical advice .. was for want of a better word .. lacking .. due to the
    fact he specifically mentions the REASON for 'snipping' the discussion .. and
    the reason FOR 'snipping' .. was incorrect.

    Therefore ANY information given as to medical advice NOW becomes .. suspect..?

    Logic ..

    >
    >So the request/challenge remains.


    For someone who has blinders on .. maybe ..

    Who loves ya.
    Tom

    Jesus Was A Vegetarian! http://jesuswasavegetarian.7h.com
    Man Is A Herbivore! http://pages.ivillage.com/ironjustice/manisaherbivore
    DEAD PEOPLE WALKING http://pages.ivillage.com/ironjustice/deadpeoplewalking
     
Loading...