ANNIA - CHANG IS WRONG

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by Not Dr Chang, Feb 12, 2004.

  1. Not Dr Chang

    Not Dr Chang Guest

    "Dr" Chung scribbled:
    > Prolonged in terms of several weeks.

    Annia wrote:
    > That's more like it. ;)

    Unfortunately, things are not bound to conform to the wishes of the ignorant.

    Merck Manual:

    >Ventricular tachycardia that lasts more than 30 seconds is called sustained ventricular
    >tachycardia.

    >Sustained ventricular tachycardia can be dangerous because the ventricles cannot fill adequately or
    >pump blood normally. Blood pressure tends to fall, and heart failure follows. Sustained ventricular
    >tachycardia is also dangerous because it can worsen until it becomes ventricular fibrillation --a
    >form of cardiac arrest. Sometimes ventricular tachycardia causes few symptoms, even at rates of up
    >to 200 beats per minute, but it may still be extremely dangerous.

    As I said, Annia should consult ER urgently when she gets an episode instead of "consulting"
    conceited little quacks on the internet.

    "Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD" <[email protected]> scribbled in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Annia wrote:
    > > > Prolonged tachycardia/irregular beat such as yours may actually result in permanent physical
    > > > damage.
    >
    > Prolonged in terms of several weeks.

    That's more like it. ;)

    >
    > > It needs diagnosing correctly
    > > > asap.
    > >
    > > *Sigh* I'm starting to get really confused about all of this now. =(
    >
    > The untruthful has this effect on people. Servant to the humblest person in the universe,
    >
    > Andrew
    >
    > --
    > Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD Board-Certified Cardiologist http://www.heartmdphd.com/

    Thanks. =)

    Sincerely, Annia

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    If you consider the content of this post to be particularly offensive, disgusting or plain illegal,
    it is probably 'designer abuse', a message designed specifically to hurt the remailer's
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    2004/02/19 <[email protected]> Len Sassaman chooses that moment to bring his support to Blue.Jay
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    More about the subject will be available http://frogadmin.yi.org/HOS/
     
    Tags:


  2. On 12 Feb 2004 13:21:14 +0100, Not Dr Chang <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"Dr" Chung scribbled:
    >> Prolonged in terms of several weeks.
    >
    >Annia wrote:
    >> That's more like it. ;)
    >
    >Unfortunately, things are not bound to conform to the wishes of the ignorant.
    >
    >Merck Manual:
    >
    >>Ventricular tachycardia that lasts more than 30 seconds is called sustained ventricular
    >>tachycardia.
    >
    >>Sustained ventricular tachycardia can be dangerous because the ventricles cannot fill adequately
    >>or pump blood normally. Blood pressure tends to fall, and heart failure follows. Sustained
    >>ventricular tachycardia is also dangerous because it can worsen until it becomes ventricular
    >>fibrillation --a form of cardiac arrest. Sometimes ventricular tachycardia causes few symptoms,
    >>even at rates of up to 200 beats per minute, but it may still be extremely dangerous.
    >
    >As I said, Annia should consult ER urgently when she gets an episode instead of "consulting"
    >conceited little quacks on the internet.
    >

    .....................

    Respectfully, I think Dr. Chung was referring to supraventricular tachycardia, which is quite
    different from ventricular tachycardia and presents nowhere near the threat of ventricular
    tachycardia.

    Still and all, the primary source of information and clarification should be the patient's own doc.

    smn
     
  3. Not Dr Chang wrote:

    > "Dr" Chung scribbled:
    > > Prolonged in terms of several weeks.
    >
    > Annia wrote:
    > > That's more like it. ;)
    >
    > Unfortunately, things are not bound to conform to the wishes of the ignorant.
    >
    > Merck Manual:
    >

    Uh-oh. Someone is about to play "doctor".

    >
    > >Ventricular tachycardia that lasts more than 30 seconds is called sustained ventricular
    > >tachycardia.
    >

    Correct.

    >
    > >Sustained ventricular tachycardia can be dangerous because the ventricles cannot fill adequately
    > >or pump blood normally.

    Correct. This *can* be dangerous when the heart is structurally *abnormal*.

    > > Blood pressure tends to fall, and heart failure follows.

    For a structurally *normal* heart, it will likely take several weeks before either occurs.

    Initially, if anything, for such a *normal* heart, blood pressure rises from increased
    cardiac output.

    Cardiac output = heart rate * stroke volume

    > >Sustained ventricular tachycardia is also dangerous because it can worsen until it becomes
    > >ventricular fibrillation --a form of cardiac arrest.

    Again, this will likely take several weeks for a person with a structurally *normal* heart.

    > >Sometimes ventricular tachycardia causes few symptoms, even at rates of up to 200 beats per
    > >minute, but it may still be extremely dangerous.
    >

    It *may* be dangerous for someone with a structurally *abnormal* heart.

    >
    > As I said,

    Who are you?

    > Annia should consult ER urgently when she gets an episode instead of "consulting" conceited little
    > quacks on the internet.
    >

    As I have written, Annia should call her doctor(s) next time she has symptoms. Her care should be
    left to those doctor(s) who know her best. Afterall, they have been managing this for *seven* years
    already :)

    Why could you call her doctor(s) "conceited little quacks on the internet" ?

    --
    Servant to the humblest person in the universe,

    Andrew

    --
    Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD
    Board-Certified Cardiologist
    http://www.heartmdphd.com/

    --
    Who is the humblest person in the universe?

    http://makeashorterlink.com/?W1F522557

    What is all this about?

    http://makeashorterlink.com/?T2CA21267
     
  4. Steve

    Steve Guest

    On Thu, 12 Feb 2004 11:29:58 -0500, Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD wrote
    (in message <[email protected]>):

    >>> Sustained ventricular tachycardia can be dangerous because the ventricles cannot fill adequately
    >>> or pump blood normally.
    >
    > Correct. This *can* be dangerous when the heart is structurally *abnormal*.
    >
    >>> Blood pressure tends to fall, and heart failure follows.
    >
    > For a structurally *normal* heart, it will likely take several weeks before either occurs.

    So let me guess... you "sensed" that Annia had a structurally normal heart, hence your advice. Or
    was it the Long Range Truth Discernment Ray that did the trick?

    --
    Steve

    Weeding the Lord's Vineyards Since 2003
     
  5. Annia

    Annia Guest

    Not Dr Chang <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > "Dr" Chung scribbled:
    > > Prolonged in terms of several weeks.
    >
    > Annia wrote:
    > > That's more like it. ;)
    >
    > Unfortunately, things are not bound to conform to the wishes of the ignorant.
    >
    > Merck Manual:
    >
    > >Ventricular tachycardia that lasts more than 30 seconds is called sustained ventricular
    > >tachycardia.
    >
    > >Sustained ventricular tachycardia can be dangerous because the ventricles cannot fill adequately
    > >or pump blood normally. Blood pressure tends to fall, and heart failure follows. Sustained
    > >ventricular tachycardia is also dangerous because it can worsen until it becomes ventricular
    > >fibrillation --a form of cardiac arrest. Sometimes ventricular tachycardia causes few symptoms,
    > >even at rates of up to 200 beats per minute, but it may still be extremely dangerous.
    >
    > As I said, Annia should consult ER urgently when she gets an episode instead of "consulting"
    > conceited little quacks on the internet.

    I'm not consulting quacks on the internet. I am consulting a cardiologist. Below I have included
    what I think is a better article on Ventricular Tachycardia. I got this article from the Health
    Resource Centre at which I volunteer, so I know it's valid. They have very strict guidelines as to
    where they get their information from.

    Ventricular tachycardia Source Citation: "Ventricular tachycardia." Dorothy Elinor Stonely,
    MD.The Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Second Edition. Jacqueline L. Longe, Editor. 5 vols.
    Farmington Hills, MI: Gale Group, 2001.

    Ventricular tachycardia (V-tach) is a rapid heart beat that originates in one of the lower chambers
    (the ventricles) of the heart. To be classified as tachycardia, the heart rate is usually at least
    100 beats per minute.

    Description

    A rapid heart rate can originate in either the left or right ventricle. Ventricular tachycardia
    which lasts more than 30 seconds is referred to as sustained ventricular tachycardia. A period of
    three to five rapid beats is called a salvo, and six beats or more lasting less than 30 seconds is
    called nonsustained ventricular tachycardia. Rapid ventricular rhythms are more serious than rapid
    atrial rhythms because they make the heart extremely inefficient. They also tend to cause more
    severe symptoms, and have a much greater tendency to result in death.

    Although generally considered to be among the life-threatening abnormal rhythms, harmless forms of
    sustained V-tach do exist. These occur in people without any structural heart disease.

    Causes and symptoms

    Most ventricular tachycardias are associated with serious heart disease such as coronary artery
    blockage, cardiomyopathy, or valvular heart disease. V-tach is often triggered by an extra beat
    originating in either the right or left ventricle. It also occurs frequently in connection with a
    heart attack. V-tach commonly occurs within 24 hours of the start of the attack. It must be treated
    quickly to prevent fibrillation. After 48 to 72 hours of the heart attack, the risk of ventricular
    tachycardia is small. However, people who have suffered severe damage to the larger anterior wall of
    the heart have a second danger period, because V-tach often occurs during convalescence from this
    type of heart attack.

    Sustained ventricular tachycardia prevents the ventricles from filling adequately so the heart can
    not pump normally. This results in loss of blood pressure, and can lead to a loss of consciousness
    and to heart failure.

    The individual with V-tach almost always experiences palpitation, though some episodes cause no
    symptoms at all.

    Diagnosis

    Diagnosis is easily made with an electrocardiogram.

    Treatment

    Any episode of ventricular tachycardia that causes symptoms needs to be treated. An episode that
    lasts more than 30 seconds, even without symptoms, also needs to be treated. Drug therapy can be
    given intravenously to suppress episodes of V-tach. If blood pressure falls below normal, a person
    will need electric cardioversion ("shock") immediately. Prognosis

    With appropriate drug or surgical treatment, ventricular tachycardia can be controlled in
    most people.

    Prevention

    A person susceptible to sustained ventricular tachycardia often has a small abnormal area in the
    ventricles that is the source of the trigger event. This area can sometimes be surgically removed.
    If surgery is not an option, and drug therapy is not effective, a device called an automatic cardioverter-
    defibrillator may be implanted.

    This information is not a tool for self-diagnosis or a substitute for professional care.


    An electrocardiographic image indicating a rapid heart beat. (Custom Medical Stock Photo. Reproduced
    by permission.) For More Information Books *

    McGoon, Michael D., ed. Mayo Clinic Heart Book: The Ultimate Guide to Heart Health. New York:
    William Morrow and Co., Inc., 1993. Organizations *

    American Heart Association. 7320 Greenville Ave. Dallas, TX 75231.
    (214)373-6300. http://www.americanheart.org Key Terms

    TermDefinition Atrial

    Having to do with the upper chambers of the heart. Cardiomyopathy

    A disease of the heart muscle.
    Cardioversion

    A electrical shock delivered to the heart to restore a normal rhythm.

    Coronary artery

    The artery that supplies blood to the heart muscle itself. Electrocardiogram

    A visual representation of the heart beat. Fibrillation

    Rapid, uncoordinated, quivering of the heart. Palpitations

    Uncomfortable feeling of the heart beat in the chest. Valvular

    Having to do with the valves inside the heart. Record Number: DU2601001451

    Copyright (c) 2003 by Gale Group . All rights reserved. Gale Group is a Thomson Corporation Company.
     
  6. Annia

    Annia Guest

    Stephen Nagler <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > On 12 Feb 2004 13:21:14 +0100, Not Dr Chang <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >"Dr" Chung scribbled:
    > >> Prolonged in terms of several weeks.
    > >
    > >Annia wrote:
    > >> That's more like it. ;)
    > >
    > >Unfortunately, things are not bound to conform to the wishes of the ignorant.
    > >
    > >Merck Manual:
    > >
    > >>Ventricular tachycardia that lasts more than 30 seconds is called sustained ventricular
    > >>tachycardia.
    >
    > >>Sustained ventricular tachycardia can be dangerous because the ventricles cannot fill adequately
    > >>or pump blood normally. Blood pressure tends to fall, and heart failure follows. Sustained
    > >>ventricular tachycardia is also dangerous because it can worsen until it becomes ventricular
    > >>fibrillation --a form of cardiac arrest. Sometimes ventricular tachycardia causes few symptoms,
    > >>even at rates of up to 200 beats per minute, but it may still be extremely dangerous.
    > >
    > >As I said, Annia should consult ER urgently when she gets an episode instead of "consulting"
    > >conceited little quacks on the internet.
    > >
    >
    > .....................
    >
    > Respectfully, I think Dr. Chung was referring to supraventricular tachycardia, which is quite
    > different from ventricular tachycardia and presents nowhere near the threat of ventricular
    > tachycardia.
    >
    > Still and all, the primary source of information and clarification should be the patient's
    > own doc.

    As I stated in my initial post, I am seeing a cardiologist.

    >
    > smn

    Annia
     
  7. On 12 Feb 2004 17:08:13 -0800, [email protected]
    (Annia) wrote:

    >As I stated in my initial post, I am seeing a cardiologist.
    .................

    Great.

    May I ask what your cardiologist said about your symptoms?

    smn
     
  8. Annia

    Annia Guest

    "Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Not Dr Chang wrote:
    >
    > > "Dr" Chung scribbled:
    > > > Prolonged in terms of several weeks.
    > >
    > > Annia wrote:
    > > > That's more like it. ;)
    > >
    > > Unfortunately, things are not bound to conform to the wishes of the ignorant.
    > >
    > > Merck Manual:
    > >
    >
    > Uh-oh. Someone is about to play "doctor".
    >
    > >
    > > >Ventricular tachycardia that lasts more than 30 seconds is called sustained ventricular
    > > >tachycardia.
    > >
    >
    > Correct.
    >
    > >
    > > >Sustained ventricular tachycardia can be dangerous because the ventricles cannot fill
    > > >adequately or pump blood normally.
    >
    > Correct. This *can* be dangerous when the heart is structurally *abnormal*.
    >
    > > > Blood pressure tends to fall, and heart failure follows.
    >
    > For a structurally *normal* heart, it will likely take several weeks before either occurs.
    >
    > Initially, if anything, for such a *normal* heart, blood pressure rises from increased
    > cardiac output.
    >
    > Cardiac output = heart rate * stroke volume
    >
    > > >Sustained ventricular tachycardia is also dangerous because it can worsen until it becomes
    > > >ventricular fibrillation --a form of cardiac arrest.
    >
    > Again, this will likely take several weeks for a person with a structurally *normal* heart.
    >
    > > >Sometimes ventricular tachycardia causes few symptoms, even at rates of up to 200 beats per
    > > >minute, but it may still be extremely dangerous.
    > >
    >
    > It *may* be dangerous for someone with a structurally *abnormal* heart.
    >
    > >
    > > As I said,
    >
    > Who are you?
    >
    > > Annia should consult ER urgently when she gets an episode instead of "consulting" conceited
    > > little quacks on the internet.
    > >
    >
    > As I have written, Annia should call her doctor(s) next time she has symptoms. Her care should be
    > left to those doctor(s) who know her best. Afterall, they have been managing this for *seven*
    > years already :)

    The doctor "managing" this for seven years (i.e., my family doctor) didn't do a very good job in my
    opinion (as I mentioned in another post). As a result I wouldn't call her.

    >
    > Why could you call her doctor(s) "conceited little quacks on the internet" ?
    >
    >
    > --
    > Servant to the humblest person in the universe,
    >
    > Andrew
    >
    > --
    > Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD Board-Certified Cardiologist http://www.heartmdphd.com/

    Sincerely, Annia
     
  9. On 12 Feb 2004 21:00:16 -0800, [email protected]
    (Annia) wrote:

    >The doctor "managing" this for seven years (i.e., my family doctor) didn't do a very good job in my
    >opinion (as I mentioned in another post). As a result I wouldn't call her.

    ................

    Then you should fire her and get a doctor who *will* do a very good job. You owe that to yourelf.

    smn
     
  10. Annia

    Annia Guest

    Stephen Nagler <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > On 12 Feb 2004 17:08:13 -0800, [email protected] (Annia) wrote:
    >
    >
    > >As I stated in my initial post, I am seeing a cardiologist.
    > .................
    >
    > Great.
    >
    > May I ask what your cardiologist said about your symptoms?
    >
    > smn

    He didn't say much about them. He explained that this could either be a serious problem or harmless.
    He also stated that he didn't want to speculate about the specific type of arrhythmia until he got
    some test results ...that's about it. I hope that answered your question ... =)
     
  11. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    "Annia" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Stephen Nagler <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > On 12 Feb 2004 17:08:13 -0800, [email protected] (Annia) wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > > >As I stated in my initial post, I am seeing a cardiologist.
    > > .................
    > >
    > > Great.
    > >
    > > May I ask what your cardiologist said about your symptoms?
    > >
    > > smn
    >
    > He didn't say much about them. He explained that this could either be a serious problem or
    > harmless. He also stated that he didn't want to speculate about the specific type of arrhythmia
    > until he got some test results ...that's about it. I hope that answered your question ... =)

    Unless you have an appointment or another test scheduled fairly soon I would call again and ask to
    talk to the Dr. about your test results - since you are obviously, and correctly, very concerned.

    However, as Dr. Chung, I think, previously pointed out, if they definitively find out anything very
    bad they really are obliged to inform you quickly so you can start taking corrective actions, not do
    anything risky, etc.

    Bill
     
  12. Annia

    Annia Guest

    Stephen Nagler <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > On 12 Feb 2004 21:00:16 -0800, [email protected] (Annia) wrote:
    >
    >
    > >The doctor "managing" this for seven years (i.e., my family doctor) didn't do a very good job in
    > >my opinion (as I mentioned in another post). As a result I wouldn't call her.
    >
    > ................
    >
    > Then you should fire her and get a doctor who *will* do a very good job. You owe that to yourelf.
    >
    > smn

    Yes, I am currently searching for a new GP. Thank you.

    Sincerely, Annia
     
  13. Annia

    Annia Guest

    > "Annia" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Stephen Nagler <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    > > > On 12 Feb 2004 17:08:13 -0800, [email protected] (Annia) wrote:
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > >As I stated in my initial post, I am seeing a cardiologist.
    > > > .................
    > > >
    > > > Great.
    > > >
    > > > May I ask what your cardiologist said about your symptoms?
    > > >
    > > > smn
    > >
    > > He didn't say much about them. He explained that this could either be a serious problem or
    > > harmless. He also stated that he didn't want to speculate about the specific type of arrhythmia
    > > until he got some test results ...that's about it. I hope that answered your question ... =)

    Thanks Bill,

    >
    > Unless you have an appointment or another test scheduled fairly soon I would call again and ask to
    > talk to the Dr. about your test results - since you are obviously, and correctly, very concerned.

    I have an echo scheduled for next Friday (February 20th).

    >
    > However, as Dr. Chung, I think, previously pointed out, if they definitively find out anything
    > very bad they really are obliged to inform you quickly so you can start taking corrective actions,
    > not do anything risky, etc.

    That's true ...I know I'm not going to die ...but I'm still a tad bit worried...

    >
    > Bill

    Sincerely, Annia
     
  14. On 13 Feb 2004 06:19:35 -0800, [email protected]
    (Annia) wrote:

    >Stephen Nagler <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:<[email protected]>...

    >> Then you should fire her and get a doctor who *will* do a very good job. You owe that to yourelf.
    >>
    >> smn
    >
    >Yes, I am currently searching for a new GP. Thank you.
    >
    >Sincerely, Annia

    ...............

    Glad to hear it.

    It's amazing to me the loyalty that some patients show their doctors, when those very doctors have
    done not a whit to deserve it! Medicine is a *service* industry. And in a service industry if the
    consumer does not like the service, then that consumer has every right to select another source for
    the service! If Dr. "A" is providing poor service and enough patiemts fire him or her, then Dr. "A"
    will get the message!

    smn
     
  15. Annia wrote:

    > Not Dr Chang <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]
    > Frog.org>...
    > > "Dr" Chung scribbled:
    > > > Prolonged in terms of several weeks.
    > >
    > > Annia wrote:
    > > > That's more like it. ;)
    > >
    > > Unfortunately, things are not bound to conform to the wishes of the ignorant.
    > >
    > > Merck Manual:
    > >
    > > >Ventricular tachycardia that lasts more than 30 seconds is called sustained ventricular
    > > >tachycardia.
    > >
    > > >Sustained ventricular tachycardia can be dangerous because the ventricles cannot fill
    > > >adequately or pump blood normally. Blood pressure tends to fall, and heart failure follows.
    > > >Sustained ventricular tachycardia is also dangerous because it can worsen until it becomes
    > > >ventricular fibrillation --a form of cardiac arrest. Sometimes ventricular tachycardia causes
    > > >few symptoms, even at rates of up to 200 beats per minute, but it may still be extremely
    > > >dangerous.
    > >
    > > As I said, Annia should consult ER urgently when she gets an episode instead of "consulting"
    > > conceited little quacks on the internet.
    >
    > I'm not consulting quacks on the internet. I am consulting a cardiologist. Below I have included
    > what I think is a better article on Ventricular Tachycardia. I got this article from the Health
    > Resource Centre at which I volunteer, so I know it's valid. They have very strict guidelines as to
    > where they get their information from.
    >
    > Ventricular tachycardia Source Citation: "Ventricular tachycardia." Dorothy Elinor Stonely,
    > MD.The Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Second Edition. Jacqueline L. Longe, Editor. 5 vols.
    > Farmington Hills, MI: Gale Group, 2001.
    >
    > Ventricular tachycardia (V-tach) is a rapid heart beat that originates in one of the lower
    > chambers (the ventricles) of the heart. To be classified as tachycardia, the heart rate is usually
    > at least 100 beats per minute.
    >
    > Description
    >
    > A rapid heart rate can originate in either the left or right ventricle. Ventricular tachycardia
    > which lasts more than 30 seconds is referred to as sustained ventricular tachycardia. A period of
    > three to five rapid beats is called a salvo, and six beats or more lasting less than 30 seconds is
    > called nonsustained ventricular tachycardia. Rapid ventricular rhythms are more serious than rapid
    > atrial rhythms because they make the heart extremely inefficient. They also tend to cause more
    > severe symptoms, and have a much greater tendency to result in death.
    >
    > Although generally considered to be among the life-threatening abnormal rhythms, harmless forms of
    > sustained V-tach do exist. These occur in people without any structural heart disease.
    >

    It brings joy to my heart when I see people use their gift of truth discernment :)

    May God forever be praised for the wonderful gifts He has bestowed upon us!

    Servant to the humblest person in the universe,

    Andrew

    --
    Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD
    Board-Certified Cardiologist
    http://www.heartmdphd.com/

    --
    Who is the humblest person in the universe?
    http://makeashorterlink.com/?W1F522557

    What is all this about?
    http://makeashorterlink.com/?T2CA21267
     
  16. Annia wrote:

    > "Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    > > Not Dr Chang wrote:
    > >
    > > > "Dr" Chung scribbled:
    > > > > Prolonged in terms of several weeks.
    > > >
    > > > Annia wrote:
    > > > > That's more like it. ;)
    > > >
    > > > Unfortunately, things are not bound to conform to the wishes of the ignorant.
    > > >
    > > > Merck Manual:
    > > >
    > >
    > > Uh-oh. Someone is about to play "doctor".
    > >
    > > >
    > > > >Ventricular tachycardia that lasts more than 30 seconds is called sustained ventricular
    > > > >tachycardia.
    > > >
    > >
    > > Correct.
    > >
    > > >
    > > > >Sustained ventricular tachycardia can be dangerous because the ventricles cannot fill
    > > > >adequately or pump blood normally.
    > >
    > > Correct. This *can* be dangerous when the heart is structurally *abnormal*.
    > >
    > > > > Blood pressure tends to fall, and heart failure follows.
    > >
    > > For a structurally *normal* heart, it will likely take several weeks before either occurs.
    > >
    > > Initially, if anything, for such a *normal* heart, blood pressure rises from increased cardiac
    > > output.
    > >
    > > Cardiac output = heart rate * stroke volume
    > >
    > > > >Sustained ventricular tachycardia is also dangerous because it can worsen until it becomes
    > > > >ventricular fibrillation --a form of cardiac arrest.
    > >
    > > Again, this will likely take several weeks for a person with a structurally *normal* heart.
    > >
    > > > >Sometimes ventricular tachycardia causes few symptoms, even at rates of up to 200 beats per
    > > > >minute, but it may still be extremely dangerous.
    > > >
    > >
    > > It *may* be dangerous for someone with a structurally *abnormal* heart.
    > >
    > > >
    > > > As I said,
    > >
    > > Who are you?
    > >
    > > > Annia should consult ER urgently when she gets an episode instead of "consulting" conceited
    > > > little quacks on the internet.
    > > >
    > >
    > > As I have written, Annia should call her doctor(s) next time she has symptoms. Her care should
    > > be left to those doctor(s) who know her best. Afterall, they have been managing this for *seven*
    > > years already :)
    >
    > The doctor "managing" this for seven years (i.e., my family doctor) didn't do a very good job in
    > my opinion (as I mentioned in another post). As a result I wouldn't call her.

    It's ok. Is sounds like you now have a cardiologist(s) who will listen to you.

    Both a real one and a virtual one :)

    Servant to the humblest person in the universe,

    Andrew

    --
    Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD
    Board-Certified Cardiologist
    http://www.heartmdphd.com/

    --
    Who is the humblest person in the universe?
    http://makeashorterlink.com/?W1F522557

    What is all this about?
    http://makeashorterlink.com/?T2CA21267
     
  17. Annia

    Annia Guest

    "Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Annia wrote:
    >
    > > "Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:<[email protected]>...
    > > > Not Dr Chang wrote:
    > > >
    > > > > "Dr" Chung scribbled:
    > > > > > Prolonged in terms of several weeks.
    > > > >
    > > > > Annia wrote:
    > > > > > That's more like it. ;)
    > > > >
    > > > > Unfortunately, things are not bound to conform to the wishes of the ignorant.
    > > > >
    > > > > Merck Manual:
    > > > >
    > > >
    > > > Uh-oh. Someone is about to play "doctor".
    > > >
    > > > >
    > > > > >Ventricular tachycardia that lasts more than 30 seconds is called sustained ventricular
    > > > > >tachycardia.
    > > > >
    > > >
    > > > Correct.
    > > >
    > > > >
    > > > > >Sustained ventricular tachycardia can be dangerous because the ventricles cannot fill
    > > > > >adequately or pump blood normally.
    > > >
    > > > Correct. This *can* be dangerous when the heart is structurally *abnormal*.
    > > >
    > > > > > Blood pressure tends to fall, and heart failure follows.
    > > >
    > > > For a structurally *normal* heart, it will likely take several weeks before either occurs.
    > > >
    > > > Initially, if anything, for such a *normal* heart, blood pressure rises from increased cardiac
    > > > output.
    > > >
    > > > Cardiac output = heart rate * stroke volume
    > > >
    > > > > >Sustained ventricular tachycardia is also dangerous because it can worsen until it becomes
    > > > > >ventricular fibrillation --a form of cardiac arrest.
    > > >
    > > > Again, this will likely take several weeks for a person with a structurally *normal* heart.
    > > >
    > > > > >Sometimes ventricular tachycardia causes few symptoms, even at rates of up to 200 beats per
    > > > > >minute, but it may still be extremely dangerous.
    > > > >
    > > >
    > > > It *may* be dangerous for someone with a structurally *abnormal* heart.
    > > >
    > > > >
    > > > > As I said,
    > > >
    > > > Who are you?
    > > >
    > > > > Annia should consult ER urgently when she gets an episode instead of "consulting" conceited
    > > > > little quacks on the internet.
    > > > >
    > > >
    > > > As I have written, Annia should call her doctor(s) next time she has symptoms. Her care should
    > > > be left to those doctor(s) who know her best. Afterall, they have been managing this for
    > > > *seven* years already :)
    > >
    > > The doctor "managing" this for seven years (i.e., my family doctor) didn't do a very good job in
    > > my opinion (as I mentioned in another post). As a result I wouldn't call her.
    >
    > It's ok. Is sounds like you now have a cardiologist(s) who will listen to you.
    >
    > Both a real one and a virtual one :)

    Yes, and both equally valuable. I cannot thank you enough.

    Sincerely, Annia

    >
    >
    > Servant to the humblest person in the universe,
    >
    > Andrew
    >
    > --
    > Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD Board-Certified Cardiologist http://www.heartmdphd.com/
     
  18. Annia wrote:

    > "Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    > > It's ok. Is sounds like you now have a cardiologist(s) who will listen to you.
    > >
    > > Both a real one and a virtual one :)
    >
    > Yes, and both equally valuable.

    Thank you for the kind word :)

    > I cannot thank you enough.
    >
    > Sincerely, Annia

    Your doing better is all the thanks I require :)

    You will remain in my prayers, neighbor.

    Servant to the humblest person in the universe,

    Andrew

    --
    Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD
    Board-Certified Cardiologist
    http://www.heartmdphd.com/

    --
    Who is the humblest person in the universe?
    http://makeashorterlink.com/?W1F522557

    What is all this about?
    http://makeashorterlink.com/?T2CA21267
     
  19. On Fri, 13 Feb 2004 22:42:30 GMT, "Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD"
    <[email protected]> wrote (in part):

    >> Yes, and both equally valuable.
    >
    >Thank you for the kind word :)
    >

    .................

    Aren't you forgetting something, Dr. Chung?

    Aren't you forgetting the part about in addition to thanking Annia for the kind word and telling her
    sincerely how much you appreciate it, you might want to let her know that your value to her as a "cyber-
    doc" in no way approximates the value to her of her own "hands-on" cardiologist - lest she, or the
    next Annia who comes along start ejecting their own doctors' advice in favor of yours.

    You know, Dr. Chung, I'm a Board-Certified physician like you. I don't boast about it at the bottom
    of my posts like you do, but it's true. And I've been around the Internet for a while. Moreover, if
    there's a mistake to be made on the Internet, likely I've made it. But the impression you leave
    folks here by allowing them to infer that they can safely take your advice over that of their own
    physicians sets a whole new standard for irresponsibility. Newbies show up here (or just lurk) each
    and every day. I strongly suggest that you place a brief disclaimer at the end of every single one
    of your posts to the effect that any changes in their medication regimen, nutritional program, or
    exercise routine that somebody might consider after reading your posts should be thoroughly
    discussed with his or her own physician prior to implementation.

    And you are in no way equally valuable as a person's own physician. A truly humble man would know
    that and readily acknowledge it.

    smn
     
  20. Annia

    Annia Guest

    "Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Annia wrote:
    >
    > > "Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:<[email protected]>...
    > >
    > > > It's ok. Is sounds like you now have a cardiologist(s) who will listen to you.
    > > >
    > > > Both a real one and a virtual one :)
    > >
    > > Yes, and both equally valuable.
    >
    > Thank you for the kind word :)

    You're welcome. I was simply stating the truth. =)

    >
    > > I cannot thank you enough.
    > >
    > > Sincerely, Annia
    >
    > Your doing better is all the thanks I require :)

    You're very kind. ;)

    >
    > You will remain in my prayers, neighbor.

    =)

    Sincerely, Annia

    >
    >
    > Servant to the humblest person in the universe,
    >
    > Andrew
    >
    > --
    > Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD Board-Certified Cardiologist http://www.heartmdphd.com/
     
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