Another bike decision to be made...

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Vince, Jan 30, 2004.

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  1. Vince

    Vince Guest

    I've narrowed down the options somewhat, to full-suss and hydraulic discs. The favourites a the
    moment are the Marin Alpine Trail and the GT i-Drive 2.0.

    Both look nice and I intend to try them out for myself over the next couple of weeks. Meanwhile, has
    anyone any particular comments on these machines? For a few quid more, the Marin East Peak is also a
    possibility. The main difference is the frame design. The Alpine Trail frame is simpler, adjustable
    and cheaper. Can anyone say from experience why the East Peak's more complex frame is better?

    I've looked at some of the American groups for info but they seem to be mired in flame wars and
    junk. The American version of the Alpine Trail appears to be a somewhat different bike, too.

    Thanks, Vince.
     
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  2. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    Vince posted ...

    > I've narrowed down the options somewhat, to full-suss and hydraulic discs. The favourites a the
    > moment are the Marin Alpine Trail and the GT i-Drive 2.0.
    >
    > Both look nice and I intend to try them out for myself over the next couple of weeks. Meanwhile,
    > has anyone any particular comments on these machines? For a few quid more, the Marin East Peak
    > is also a possibility. The main difference is the frame design. The Alpine Trail frame is
    > simpler, adjustable and cheaper. Can anyone say from experience why the East Peak's more complex
    > frame is better?
    >
    > I've looked at some of the American groups for info but they seem to be mired in flame wars and
    > junk. The American version of the Alpine Trail appears to be a somewhat different bike, too.
    >
    > Thanks, Vince.

    The East Peak _should_ iron out more of the 'bobbing' you get, when standing on the pedals. The rear
    suspension mounting point is slightly different giving a different suspension 'feel'. Generally
    though this is a moot point and whether you can actually 'feel' the difference is down to individual
    riders I reckon. If you get the chance to try them then you'll have a good chance to see what you
    like best.

    Personally I'd say save the extra money, buy the Alpine Trail, and get some decent gloves, shorts
    shoes and. if you like them, helmet .. ;)

    --
    Paul
     
  3. have a look at the Giant VT2. I bought myself one for Christmas and it's excellent - http://www.giant-
    bicycle.com/uk/030.000.000/030.000.000.asp?dealerid=&dealercountry=&lYear=2004&bikesection=8810&ran-
    ge=132&model=10016 no pedal bob at all and nearly 6" travel at both ends!! I got mine from http://www.factory-
    discountcycles.co.uk/acatalog/Giant_mountain.html for not much more than the Marin. Cheers Colin

    news:[email protected]...
    > Vince posted ...
    >
    > > I've narrowed down the options somewhat, to full-suss and hydraulic discs. The favourites a the
    > > moment are the Marin Alpine Trail and the GT i-Drive 2.0.
    > >
    > > Both look nice and I intend to try them out for myself over the next couple of weeks. Meanwhile,
    > > has anyone any particular comments on these machines? For a few quid more, the Marin East Peak
    > > is also a possibility. The main difference is the frame design. The Alpine Trail frame is
    > > simpler, adjustable and cheaper. Can anyone say from experience why the East Peak's more complex
    > > frame is better?
    > >
    > > I've looked at some of the American groups for info but they seem to be mired in flame wars and
    > > junk. The American version of the Alpine Trail appears to be a somewhat different bike, too.
    > >
    > > Thanks, Vince.
    >
    > The East Peak _should_ iron out more of the 'bobbing' you get, when
    standing
    > on the pedals. The rear suspension mounting point is slightly different giving a different
    > suspension 'feel'. Generally though this is a moot
    point
    > and whether you can actually 'feel' the difference is down to individual riders I reckon. If you
    > get the chance to try them then you'll have a
    good
    > chance to see what you like best.
    >
    > Personally I'd say save the extra money, buy the Alpine Trail, and get
    some
    > decent gloves, shorts shoes and. if you like them, helmet .. ;)
    >
    >
    > --
    > Paul
     
  4. Peter B

    Peter B Guest

    "Vince" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I've narrowed down the options somewhat, to full-suss and hydraulic discs. The favourites a the
    > moment are the Marin Alpine Trail and the GT i-Drive 2.0.
    >
    > Both look nice and I intend to try them out for myself over the next couple of weeks. Meanwhile,
    > has anyone any particular comments on these machines? For a few quid more, the Marin East Peak is
    > also a possibility.

    I have seen last years East Peaks going for <£1k complete with discs.

    Re the 4 point suspension on current Marins: I've never ridden one but have an older single pivot
    Rift Zone. One of the attractions of Marins rear sus was its simplicity, less to go wrong and fewer
    dirt traps so I would take some convincing to upgrade to the 4 point arrangement.
    --
    Regards, Pete
     
  5. Vince

    Vince Guest

    >The East Peak _should_ iron out more of the 'bobbing' you get, when
    standing
    > on the pedals. Generally though this is a moot point and whether you can actually 'feel' the
    > difference is down to individual riders I reckon.
    >
    > Personally I'd say save the extra money, buy the Alpine Trail...

    I'm inclined to agree. I don't think I'm a sufficiently 'hard core' rider to spot the nuances of the
    various frames beyond "I like the feel of this bike" or ""Not so sure about this one."

    Vince.
     
  6. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    "Colin Anderson" <[email protected]> writes:

    > have a look at the Giant VT2. I bought myself one for Christmas and it's excellent - http://www.giant-
    > bicycle.com/uk/030.000.000/030.000.000.asp?dealerid=&dealercountry=&lYear=2004&bikesection=8810&r-
    > ange=132&model=10016 no pedal bob at all and nearly 6" travel at both ends!! I got mine from http://www.factory-
    > discountcycles.co.uk/acatalog/Giant_mountain.html for not much more than the Marin.

    One thing to watch is that the rear shock on that Giant is _very_ vulnerable to mud thrown by the
    rear wheel - something that is far more of an issue in muddy Britain than in the relatively dusty
    United States. Shock maintenance or replacement is expensive. The Alpine Trail doesn't have that
    problem because the shock is protected by the seat tube.

    The GT has the same problem but not quite so badly, but it also has a lot of pivots. The East Peak
    also has lots of pivots. More pivots mean, on the whole, more slop and more maintenance. In wet,
    muddy places they're all vulnerable to accelerated wear. These complex multi-pivot designs are
    intended to react better when you're out of the saddle, but few of them work well and in any case
    you're usually better staying in the saddle and spinning on steep climbs.

    Personally, of the four, I'd go for the Alpine Trail. It's the simplest and likely to be the most
    reliable under British conditions. If you were seriously racing then the extra maintenance costs of
    a multi-link design might conceivably be worth it, but personally I'm skeptical.

    Other things I'd advise you to look at in this sort of area would be the Santa Cruz Heckler and
    Superlight (excellent, simple, pricey), the Cannondale Jekyll (the rear shock is vulnerable to mud,
    but it's a lovely bike), Orange Five (ugly as sin but competent and British), Whyte PRST-4 (radical
    looks but actually a very competent bike - and British again). All of these would be well worth a
    test ride.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    ;; single speed mountain bikes: for people who cycle on flat mountains.
     
  7. Peter B

    Peter B Guest

    "Simon Brooke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Personally, of the four, I'd go for the Alpine Trail. It's the simplest and likely to be the most
    > reliable under British conditions.

    Sound advice.

    > Other things I'd advise you to look at in this sort of area would be the ...........Orange Five
    > (ugly as sin but competent and British),

    Aye, looks like it was made by a blacksmith.

    <ducks to avoid thrown anvil and various discarded junk thrown by Orange
    Cultists>

    --
    Regards, Pete
     
  8. Vince

    Vince Guest

    Simon Brooke <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > ...mud... ...muddy Britain... ...slop... ...wet, muddy places...

    You mean, it isn't like that everywhere? Damn!

    > Personally, of the four, I'd go for the Alpine Trail. ...likely to be the most reliable under
    > British conditions...

    I'm inclined to agree.

    > Other things I'd advise you to look at...

    All a bit over my price range, but I'll take some time out over the next few weeks to see whats
    available. Thanks for the advice. Give me a base from which to work.

    Vince.
     
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