Another Restaurant Water Complaint

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by jmcquown, Apr 8, 2006.

  1. "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:e[email protected]:

    >
    > "Gregory Morrow"
    > <[email protected]> wrote
    >>
    >> Some call me Greg, some Gregory, I don't care. It's nice that the
    >> person knows my name and greets me, why get upset...

    >
    > I know ... I don't know what the problem is, and now I've made note
    > not to accidentally call my sil Barb. Me, I don't care. Whatever.
    > I have my own hot buttons, for sure.


    Mostly people just call me Rhonda, but I don't mind Ron or Ronnie (my sis
    calls me Ronnie sometimes). However, there's been one or two blokes at
    work who've, for some unknown reason, decided to call me Rondy. Hated it!
    Didn't say anything, though, just gritted my teeth. My pet hate is people
    spelling my name incorrectly - mostly by leaving out the "h". Once
    someone was taking my name down over the phone - I mentioned it was
    Rhonda with an "h". Fax came through addressed to Rondah <g>.

    My sister was the one that was worse off. Her name is Lenora, which is
    not a common name here - I don't know any others. There was one teacher
    who called her Leonore all the way through high school.She used to get
    Lenore as well.

    The main problem for both of us, though, was our maiden surname - Roast.
    People either didn't hear it as it was and thought it was Rhodes or Rose
    or other names, or else they thought it was very humorous and made,
    mostly very unoriginal, jokes about it.

    --
    Rhonda Anderson
    Cranebrook, NSW, Australia
     


  2. On Tue 11 Apr 2006 05:16:21a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Rhonda
    Anderson?

    > "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    >>
    >> "Gregory Morrow"
    >> <[email protected]> wrote
    >>>
    >>> Some call me Greg, some Gregory, I don't care. It's nice that the
    >>> person knows my name and greets me, why get upset...

    >>
    >> I know ... I don't know what the problem is, and now I've made note
    >> not to accidentally call my sil Barb. Me, I don't care. Whatever.
    >> I have my own hot buttons, for sure.

    >
    > Mostly people just call me Rhonda, but I don't mind Ron or Ronnie (my sis
    > calls me Ronnie sometimes). However, there's been one or two blokes at
    > work who've, for some unknown reason, decided to call me Rondy. Hated it!
    > Didn't say anything, though, just gritted my teeth. My pet hate is people
    > spelling my name incorrectly - mostly by leaving out the "h". Once
    > someone was taking my name down over the phone - I mentioned it was
    > Rhonda with an "h". Fax came through addressed to Rondah <g>.
    >
    > My sister was the one that was worse off. Her name is Lenora, which is
    > not a common name here - I don't know any others. There was one teacher
    > who called her Leonore all the way through high school.She used to get
    > Lenore as well.
    >
    > The main problem for both of us, though, was our maiden surname - Roast.
    > People either didn't hear it as it was and thought it was Rhodes or Rose
    > or other names, or else they thought it was very humorous and made,
    > mostly very unoriginal, jokes about it.


    One of my co-workers is named Ronda (without the "h"). I went to high
    school with our minister's daughter who had the misfortune to have been
    named "Penny Bright" (Penelope, of course, but no one called her that).

    --
    Wayne Boatwright @¿@¬
    _____________________
     
  3. Glitter Ninja wrote:

    > I don't holler at people for it, but I detest being called "Stace". I
    > will say once to please not call me "Stace" but won't harp on it if
    > people insist, since I know they might get their feelings hurt.
    > Personally, I try really hard to get others' names right, and I *hate*
    > it when I get a name a little wrong and get chewed out for it. Polite
    > correction is one thing but some people just lose their minds, like this
    > Susan lady you mentioned.



    I work with a bunch of people whose native language is not English. One
    of them originally called me Mago. It took me awhile to figure out what
    she was saying, and then I didn't want her to feel bad. So, I never
    said anything. She figured it out pretty quickly.

    One of my newest co-workers calls me Meggie. I don't know if he doesn't
    know my full name or just misheard it. They do not normally end words
    in the letter g, so he may be adding the ie to get a vowel sound. They
    will often do that to words that end in consonants other than s, k, t,
    or n. So, they will say lunchie, and offu. Over time, they lose it, but
    it sounds cute, so we don't mind.

    Anyway, the guy sounds cute saying my name as Meggie, and always has a
    genuine happy smile, so its fine by me :)

    One of my other co-workers called everybody Miss xx until somebody
    mentioned it. I thought it was very cute, and I liked it, but he quit
    doing it.
     
  4. On 11 Apr 2006 14:53:21 +0200, Wayne Boatwright
    <wayneboatwright_at_gmail.com> wrote:

    >One of my co-workers is named Ronda (without the "h"). I went to high
    >school with our minister's daughter who had the misfortune to have been
    >named "Penny Bright" (Penelope, of course, but no one called her that).


    Not as bad as Connie Balls.

    Carol
    --

    Some people are like Slinkies... they don't really have a purpose but
    they bring a smile to your face when you push them down the stairs.

    Stolen from "traid" on the IRC
     
  5. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    "Damsel in dis Dress" <[email protected]> wrote

    > On 11 Apr 2006 14:53:21 +0200, Wayne Boatwright
    > <wayneboatwright_at_gmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >>One of my co-workers is named Ronda (without the "h"). I went to high
    >>school with our minister's daughter who had the misfortune to have been
    >>named "Penny Bright" (Penelope, of course, but no one called her that).

    >
    > Not as bad as Connie Balls.


    Or Ophelia Balls.

    nancy
     
  6. On Tue 11 Apr 2006 06:18:30a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Damsel in
    dis Dress?

    > On 11 Apr 2006 14:53:21 +0200, Wayne Boatwright
    > <wayneboatwright_at_gmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >>One of my co-workers is named Ronda (without the "h"). I went to high
    >>school with our minister's daughter who had the misfortune to have been
    >>named "Penny Bright" (Penelope, of course, but no one called her that).

    >
    > Not as bad as Connie Balls.


    Pretty bad! LOL!

    --
    Wayne Boatwright Õ¿Õ¬
    ________________________________________

    Okay, okay, I take it back! UnScrew you!
     
  7. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Rhonda Anderson wrote:
    > "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    > >
    > > "Gregory Morrow"
    > > <[email protected]> wrote
    > >>
    > >> Some call me Greg, some Gregory, I don't care. It's nice that the
    > >> person knows my name and greets me, why get upset...

    > >
    > > I know ... I don't know what the problem is, and now I've made note
    > > not to accidentally call my sil Barb. Me, I don't care. Whatever.
    > > I have my own hot buttons, for sure.

    >
    > Mostly people just call me Rhonda, but I don't mind Ron or Ronnie (my sis
    > calls me Ronnie sometimes). However, there's been one or two blokes at
    > work who've, for some unknown reason, decided to call me Rondy. Hated it!
    > Didn't say anything, though, just gritted my teeth. My pet hate is people
    > spelling my name incorrectly - mostly by leaving out the "h". Once
    > someone was taking my name down over the phone - I mentioned it was
    > Rhonda with an "h". Fax came through addressed to Rondah <g>.
    >
    > My sister was the one that was worse off. Her name is Lenora, which is
    > not a common name here - I don't know any others. There was one teacher
    > who called her Leonore all the way through high school.She used to get
    > Lenore as well.
    >
    > The main problem for both of us, though, was our maiden surname - Roast.
    > People either didn't hear it as it was and thought it was Rhodes or Rose
    > or other names, or else they thought it was very humorous and made,
    > mostly very unoriginal, jokes about it.


    Every time I see your name I think of the Beach Boys "Rhonda"...


    Well since she put me down I've been out doin' in my head
    Come in late at night and in the mornin' I just lay in bed

    Well, rhonda you look so fine (look so fine)
    And I know it wouldn't take much time
    For you to help me rhonda
    Help me get her out of my heart

    Help me rhonda
    Help, help me rhonda
    Help me rhonda
    Help, help me rhonda
    Help me rhonda
    Help, help me rhonda
    Help me rhonda
    Help, help me rhonda
    Help me rhonda
    Help, help me rhonda
    Help me rhonda
    Help, help me rhonda
    Help me rhonda yeah
    Get her out of my heart

    She was gonna be my wife
    And I was gonna be her man
    But she let another guy come between us
    And it ruined our plan

    Well, rhonda you caught my eye (caught my eye)
    And I can give you lotsa reasons why
    You gotta help me rhonda
    Help me get her out of my heart

    Help me rhonda
    Help, help me rhonda
    Help me rhonda
    Help, help me rhonda
    Help me rhonda
    Help, help me rhonda
    Help me rhonda
    Help, help me rhonda
    Help me rhonda
    Help, help me rhonda
    Help me rhonda
    Help, help me rhonda
    Help me rhonda yeah
    Get her out of my heart

    Help me rhonda
    Help, help me rhonda
    Help me rhonda
    Help, help me rhonda
    Help me rhonda
    Help, help me rhonda
    Help me rhonda
    Help, help me rhonda
    Help me rhonda
    Help, help me rhonda
    Help me rhonda
    Help, help me rhonda
    Help me rhonda yeah
    Get her out of my heart

    Help me rhonda
    Help, help me rhonda
    Help me rhonda
    Help, help me rhonda
    Help me rhonda
    Help, help me rhonda
    Help me rhonda
    Help, help me rhonda

    -------------------------

    Sheldon
     
  8. On Tue 11 Apr 2006 06:26:39a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Nancy
    Young?

    >
    > "Damsel in dis Dress" <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    >> On 11 Apr 2006 14:53:21 +0200, Wayne Boatwright
    >> <wayneboatwright_at_gmail.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>>One of my co-workers is named Ronda (without the "h"). I went to high
    >>>school with our minister's daughter who had the misfortune to have been
    >>>named "Penny Bright" (Penelope, of course, but no one called her that).

    >>
    >> Not as bad as Connie Balls.

    >
    > Or Ophelia Balls.


    OMG, that's even worse!

    Ima Hogg was the real name of the daughter of James Stephen Hogg, a former
    governor of Texas.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright Õ¿Õ¬
    ________________________________________

    Okay, okay, I take it back! UnScrew you!
     
  9. In article <[email protected]>,
    Damsel in dis Dress <[email protected]> wrote:

    > A childhood friend of mine was almost not permitted to leave the
    > (Catholic) hospital because her parents had named her Laurie. They
    > made up for it later with Peter and Paul. Somehow, they sneaked
    > Michelle out of the hospital.


    Well, since Michelle is the feminine of Michael, that makes sense.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
  10. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Dee Randall" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I just had another great-grandson last month. His name is Mason -- well,
    > you know what the name reminds me of right off -- tee hee. Just can't help
    > it!
    > Wonder if this is a NEW name, Mason?


    No, it is part of the natural progression of nomenclature. First a
    last name, then a male given name, then a female given name. Think
    Taylor, Darcy, Ryan.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
  11. In article <[email protected]>,
    Goomba38 <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I LIKE the name Mason. You know exactly how it is pronounced, you can
    > more safely assume the holder is male and be correct and it is easy to
    > spell. It is a strong respectable, non-trendy name IMO.


    I'd be willing to bet that there are already girls named Mason.
    *shudder*

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
  12. In article <[email protected]>,
    "[email protected]" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > One of my newest co-workers calls me Meggie. I don't know if he doesn't
    > know my full name or just misheard it. They do not normally end words
    > in the letter g, so he may be adding the ie to get a vowel sound. They
    > will often do that to words that end in consonants other than s, k, t,
    > or n. So, they will say lunchie, and offu. Over time, they lose it, but
    > it sounds cute, so we don't mind.


    Something we noticed is that our Arab family and friends do _NOT_ get
    calling someone by something other than his full given name. It's not
    that people don't get nicknames in Arab countries, I know of several in
    our family alone, but you don't use a diminutive form of your name ever
    referring to yourself, and only close people in certain contexts would
    call you by those names. So, nobody calls my husband Rich, always
    Richard. In some ways, it doesn't matter that I call him Rich, because,
    after all I'm his wife and more intimate with him.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
  13. In article <[email protected]>,
    Damsel in dis Dress <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Mon, 10 Apr 2006 10:43:25 -0700, Ranee Mueller
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >In article <[email protected]>,
    > > Damsel in dis Dress <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> Oh, I'll just bet! If I give you the phone number, wanna have a talk
    > >> with the mother-to-be? <G>

    > >
    > > I don't know that I'd call a stranger who didn't ask my opinion, but
    > >there are days when I think I could do that. ;)

    >
    > I'm gonna need you to work on my niece, too. E-T-H-E-N. What does it
    > take? Do we need to get you schnockered?


    Confession: I've never been drunk. Not even once. And when I was
    younger I tried. I decided it must be a higher tolerance because of my
    ethnicity or because my dad drank too much, and just never drank too
    heavily after that. I could drink the pilots under the table when Rich
    was in flight school, and I still can with his co-workers. Mostly, I
    just don't have more than a few drinks, and only occasionally. I don't
    like being out of control of my own body, I guess. If I start to feel a
    little tipsy, I slow down or stop. The most I've had to drink in recent
    memory was in December at a wine tasting meal, I had eight full glasses
    of wine, including some port at the end. I started to feel a little
    light, but that was it.

    Anyway, I don't have any suggestions about people taking normal names
    and spelling them weird. Maybe you can tell her how much you love the
    name spelled the way it usually is, tell her something about the meaning
    (strength, firmness), something.

    Regards,
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
  14. On Tue, 11 Apr 2006 08:57:33 -0700, Ranee Mueller
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Confession: I've never been drunk. Not even once. And when I was
    >younger I tried. I decided it must be a higher tolerance because of my
    >ethnicity or because my dad drank too much, and just never drank too
    >heavily after that. I could drink the pilots under the table when Rich
    >was in flight school, and I still can with his co-workers. Mostly, I
    >just don't have more than a few drinks, and only occasionally. I don't
    >like being out of control of my own body, I guess. If I start to feel a
    >little tipsy, I slow down or stop. The most I've had to drink in recent
    >memory was in December at a wine tasting meal, I had eight full glasses
    >of wine, including some port at the end. I started to feel a little
    >light, but that was it.


    I've been drunk 3 times, I think. Apparently, I'm a fun drunk. But I
    don't like the out of control feeling, either. Never had a hangover.

    > Anyway, I don't have any suggestions about people taking normal names
    >and spelling them weird. Maybe you can tell her how much you love the
    >name spelled the way it usually is, tell her something about the meaning
    >(strength, firmness), something.


    I've talked to the little mama about this several times. She reacts
    with complete indifference, the same way she has taken this whole
    pregnancy. It seems more and more tragic every day. :-(

    Carol
    --

    Some people are like Slinkies... they don't really have a purpose but
    they bring a smile to your face when you push them down the stairs.

    Stolen from "traid" on the IRC
     
  15. jmcquown wrote:
    >
    > I don't expect lemons in my water. Who decided lemons in water is 'de
    > rigeur'? I shouldn't have to say "no lemon". People who want lemon should
    > have to ask for it. (Oddly enough, these lemon wedges in the water don't
    > cost extra since it's not bottled water, yet the restauranteur has to pay
    > for lemons; go figure.) Who decided this? I take out the lemon with a
    > spoon but I hate finding lemon seeds floating in my ice water! If I wanted
    > to make lemonade, I'd ask for more lemon wedges and sugar, much. I'd just
    > like plain old ice water, thanks.
    >
    > Jill <--feeling punchy after being up late and getting up early


    Well, I don't expect them either but I think it's a nice touch.
    I don't mind them at all. Gives the water a nice flavor. However,
    I hate it when my iced tea comes with lemon floating in it after I
    specifically asked for "No lemon, no sugar!". Grrrr!

    Kate

    --
    Kate Connally
    “If I were as old as I feel, I’d be dead already.”
    Goldfish: “The wholesome snack that smiles back,
    Until you bite their heads off.”
    What if the hokey pokey really *is* what it's all about?
    mailto:[email protected]
     
  16. Ophelia

    Ophelia Guest


    > On Tue 11 Apr 2006 06:26:39a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Nancy
    > Young?
    >
    > >
    > > "Damsel in dis Dress" <[email protected]> wrote
    > >
    > >> On 11 Apr 2006 14:53:21 +0200, Wayne Boatwright
    > >> <wayneboatwright_at_gmail.com> wrote:
    > >>
    > >>>One of my co-workers is named Ronda (without the "h"). I went to high
    > >>>school with our minister's daughter who had the misfortune to have been
    > >>>named "Penny Bright" (Penelope, of course, but no one called her that).
    > >>
    > >> Not as bad as Connie Balls.

    > >
    > > Or Ophelia Balls.



    Oi!!!!!!!!!
     
  17. "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    >
    > Rhonda Anderson wrote:


    >>
    >> Mostly people just call me Rhonda, but I don't mind Ron or Ronnie (my
    >> sis calls me Ronnie sometimes). However, there's been one or two
    >> blokes at work who've, for some unknown reason, decided to call me
    >> Rondy. Hated it! Didn't say anything, though, just gritted my teeth.
    >> My pet hate is people spelling my name incorrectly - mostly by
    >> leaving out the "h". Once someone was taking my name down over the
    >> phone - I mentioned it was Rhonda with an "h". Fax came through
    >> addressed to Rondah <g>.


    >
    > Every time I see your name I think of the Beach Boys "Rhonda"...


    Ha, if I had a dollar for every time someone said or sang "Help me
    Rhonda" to me, I'd be a squillionaire. There were a few at work at one
    stage who even renamed me "Help Me Rhonda" <g>.

    --
    Rhonda Anderson
    Cranebrook, NSW, Australia
     
  18. Syssi

    Syssi Guest

    "Damsel in dis Dress" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Sat, 08 Apr 2006 17:08:16 GMT, "Syssi" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>"Damsel in dis Dress" wrote things that I snipped because I just wanted to
    >>get to one of her newer sig lines...>
    >>
    >>> Some people are like Slinkies... they don't really have a purpose but
    >>> they bring a smile to your face when you push them down the stairs.
    >>> ------------------

    >>
    >>I LOVE this!! I plan on sharing it with others... totally funny!

    >
    > Go for it! I stole it (with permission), and you may borrow it from
    > me. :D
    >
    > Carol
    > --
    >
    > Some people are like Slinkies... they don't really have a purpose but
    > they bring a smile to your face when you push them down the stairs.
    >
    > Stolen from "traid" on the IRC

    =====

    Thank you Grand Head Trollop! <giggle>
     
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