Answer to "Who stole the kishka?"

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Curly Sue, Jan 13, 2006.

  1. Curly Sue

    Curly Sue Guest

    Tags:


  2. kevnbro

    kevnbro Guest

    I've heard of hiding the salami but not stealing the sausage. kev
     
  3. zxcvbob

    zxcvbob Guest

    Curly Sue wrote:
    > Some say grandma did!
    >
    > http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/10837203/
    >
    > Sue(tm)
    > Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!




    Well, the had to arrest *somebody* for looting. (I hope you didn't
    expect them to arrest the cops who were stealing Cadillacs from the car
    dealers' lots.)

    Best regards,
    Bob
     
  4. Curly Sue wrote:
    > Some say grandma did!
    >
    > http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/10837203/
    >
    > Sue(tm)
    > Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!


    Sue, Kishka is nothing like a sausage. It is a dish made with stuffed
    intestines.
     
  5. Victor Sack

    Victor Sack Guest

    Margaret Suran <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Sue, Kishka is nothing like a sausage. It is a dish made with stuffed
    > intestines.


    So is sausage, very often.

    Bubba
     
  6. Victor Sack wrote:
    > Margaret Suran <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Sue, Kishka is nothing like a sausage. It is a dish made with stuffed
    >>intestines.

    >
    >
    > So is sausage, very often.
    >
    > Bubba


    Your newest name must be Bubba Wise-Guy. Sausage stuffing is made of
    mostly meats in natural casings, Kishka is mostly bread crumbs or
    matzoh meal and flour and fat in casings. BTW, did you ever try
    Kishka? Not exactly gourmet food, just another way not to let any
    part of the slaughtered animal go to waste.

    Here is a recipe for Kishka from Google


    Kishka

    Kosher Stuffed Derma (Kishka)

    Makes: 6 servings


    9 Feet of clean beef casings. (Buy at a Kosher butcher if you can find
    one)
    2 cup flour
    1 cup matzo meal (available at local supermarket)
    1 1/2 tsp salt
    1/4 tsp pepper
    1 cup melted schmaltz (chicken fat) or chopped suet

    Wash casings in cold water and cut into 12 inch lengths. Tie one end of
    each length tightly with white sewing thread. Turn casings inside-out.
    Combine flour, matzo meal, seasonings and schmaltz or suet. Fill each
    casing loosely with this stuffing and tie the remaining end. Drop into
    rapidly boiling water and boil 10 minutes. Drain. When cool enough to
    handle, scrape fat off the casings with the dull edge of a knife. Drop
    into rapidly boiling water (about a gallon) to which has been added 1
    tablespoon salt and at least 1 teaspoon pepper. Reduce heat and simmer
    uncovered for 3 hours. Remove from water. Brown for 1 hour around a roast
    or roasting poultry. (You can also refrigerate and then slice pieces about
    1 inch thick and fry them--on both sides.)

    Source:

    unknown unknown <[email protected]>

    Monday, March 05, 2001 8:28 PM
     
  7. Boron Elgar

    Boron Elgar Guest

    On Fri, 13 Jan 2006 19:13:12 -0500, Margaret Suran
    <[email protected]> wrote:


    >Here is a recipe for Kishka from Google
    >
    >
    >Kishka
    >
    >Kosher Stuffed Derma (Kishka)
    >
    >Makes: 6 servings
    >
    >
    >9 Feet of clean beef casings. (Buy at a Kosher butcher if you can find
    >one)
    >2 cup flour
    >1 cup matzo meal (available at local supermarket)
    >1 1/2 tsp salt
    >1/4 tsp pepper
    >1 cup melted schmaltz (chicken fat) or chopped suet
    >
    >Wash casings in cold water and cut into 12 inch lengths. Tie one end of
    >each length tightly with white sewing thread. Turn casings inside-out.
    >Combine flour, matzo meal, seasonings and schmaltz or suet. Fill each
    >casing loosely with this stuffing and tie the remaining end. Drop into
    >rapidly boiling water and boil 10 minutes. Drain. When cool enough to
    >handle, scrape fat off the casings with the dull edge of a knife. Drop
    >into rapidly boiling water (about a gallon) to which has been added 1
    >tablespoon salt and at least 1 teaspoon pepper. Reduce heat and simmer
    >uncovered for 3 hours. Remove from water. Brown for 1 hour around a roast
    >or roasting poultry. (You can also refrigerate and then slice pieces about
    >1 inch thick and fry them--on both sides.)
    >


    I have not had, nor even seen kishka in 25 or 30 years, though if I
    remember correctly, the song from which the title of this thread is
    taken also had a rather risque meaning. I recall my dad & his brothers
    all "nudge, nudge, wink, wink," when singing it. (they all had lovely
    voices, though).

    Boron
     
  8. Victor Sack

    Victor Sack Guest

    Margaret Suran <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Victor Sack wrote:
    > > Margaret Suran <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >>Sue, Kishka is nothing like a sausage. It is a dish made with stuffed
    > >>intestines.

    > >
    > > So is sausage, very often.

    >
    > Your newest name must be Bubba Wise-Guy. Sausage stuffing is made of
    > mostly meats in natural casings,


    Ever tried the "modern" commercial rendition of the venerable British
    banger? Nowadays, it is often enough made mostly with something tasting
    very much like more-than-usually-bland sawdust (actually, bread crumbs
    or rusk) and hardly any meat.

    > Kishka is mostly bread crumbs or
    > matzoh meal and flour and fat in casings.


    Only the present-day Jewish-American version of it. There used to be
    lots of variations. "Kishka" is a Russian (and generally Slavonic) word
    meaning "intestine" and the thing is actually a more-or-less generic
    sausage.

    Bubba Wise-Guy
     
  9. Victor Sack wrote:
    > Margaret Suran <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Victor Sack wrote:
    >>
    >>>Margaret Suran <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>Sue, Kishka is nothing like a sausage. It is a dish made with stuffed
    >>>>intestines.
    >>>
    >>>So is sausage, very often.

    >>
    >>Your newest name must be Bubba Wise-Guy. Sausage stuffing is made of
    >>mostly meats in natural casings,

    >
    >
    > Ever tried the "modern" commercial rendition of the venerable British
    > banger? Nowadays, it is often enough made mostly with something tasting
    > very much like more-than-usually-bland sawdust (actually, bread crumbs
    > or rusk) and hardly any meat.
    >
    >
    >>Kishka is mostly bread crumbs or
    >>matzoh meal and flour and fat in casings.

    >
    >
    > Only the present-day Jewish-American version of it. There used to be
    > lots of variations. "Kishka" is a Russian (and generally Slavonic) word
    > meaning "intestine" and the thing is actually a more-or-less generic
    > sausage.
    >
    > Bubba Wise-Guy


    I thought the word was Yiddish. I guess I was wrong. I do not even
    remember whether Kischka was something that I knew when I grew up. It
    was certainly not served in our home, but perhaps in my grandparents'
    at one of their large holiday dinners. Nah, I do not think so.

    Here, when I first heard of it, it was called Stuffed Derma, not
    Kischka. If you went to a hotel in the Borscht Belt, it would be a
    staple on every menu in the evening. At lunch, only dairy was served
    at those hotels, or fish or something that was not fleischig.

    Though we did not have Kischka in Vienna, we did have something
    similar, something that was delicious: Stuffed Goose Neck. The skin
    of the goose, cleaned of fat and any kind of gristle and stuffed with
    bread, egg, herbs, Goose fat, perhaps some goose liver, I do not know
    what the stuffing contained, but it was delicious. It was baked with
    the Goose, until the skin was crispy crunchy and the stuffing was
    fully cooked. The neck would be sliced and served as a side dish to
    the Goose. We had Goose once a month, a necessity, since we needed
    the Goose fat for cooking. I liked roasted Goose, but I loved the
    roasted neck. Yet, thinking back, I never asked for a second slice.
    There was plenty, Geese have long necks and my sister didn't want any.
    I was a strange little girl. I hardly ever asked for anything.

    I attempted making it when I was married and I made a Goose. I could
    not duplicate what I had eaten as a child.

    Bubba Wise Guy, I believe I asked you about stuffed Goose necks
    before. They are still eaten in Germany, I believe.
     
  10. Boron Elgar

    Boron Elgar Guest

    On Sun, 15 Jan 2006 18:22:31 -0500, Margaret Suran
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >
    >Though we did not have Kischka in Vienna, we did have something
    >similar, something that was delicious: Stuffed Goose Neck. The skin
    >of the goose, cleaned of fat and any kind of gristle and stuffed with
    >bread, egg, herbs, Goose fat, perhaps some goose liver, I do not know
    >what the stuffing contained, but it was delicious. It was baked with
    >the Goose, until the skin was crispy crunchy and the stuffing was
    >fully cooked. The neck would be sliced and served as a side dish to
    >the Goose. We had Goose once a month, a necessity, since we needed
    >the Goose fat for cooking. I liked roasted Goose, but I loved the
    >roasted neck. Yet, thinking back, I never asked for a second slice.
    >There was plenty, Geese have long necks and my sister didn't want any.
    > I was a strange little girl. I hardly ever asked for anything.
    >
    >I attempted making it when I was married and I made a Goose. I could
    >not duplicate what I had eaten as a child.
    >
    >Bubba Wise Guy, I believe I asked you about stuffed Goose necks
    >before. They are still eaten in Germany, I believe.



    Suffed helzel. My mother made that whenever we had a stuffed chicken
    or turkey. Goose would have been better, but she never made goose.

    She never made the kishka, either, that was purchased at the local
    deli, if anyone wanted it.

    Boron
     
  11. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Boron Elgar wrote:
    > Margaret Suran wrote:
    >
    > >Though we did not have Kischka in Vienna, we did have something
    > >similar, something that was delicious: Stuffed Goose Neck. The skin
    > >of the goose, cleaned of fat and any kind of gristle and stuffed with
    > >bread, egg, herbs, Goose fat, perhaps some goose liver, I do not know
    > >what the stuffing contained, but it was delicious. It was baked with
    > >the Goose, until the skin was crispy crunchy and the stuffing was
    > >fully cooked. The neck would be sliced and served as a side dish to
    > >the Goose. We had Goose once a month, a necessity, since we needed
    > >the Goose fat for cooking. I liked roasted Goose, but I loved the
    > >roasted neck. Yet, thinking back, I never asked for a second slice.
    > >There was plenty, Geese have long necks and my sister didn't want any.
    > > I was a strange little girl. I hardly ever asked for anything.
    > >
    > >I attempted making it when I was married and I made a Goose. I could
    > >not duplicate what I had eaten as a child.
    > >
    > >Bubba Wise Guy, I believe I asked you about stuffed Goose necks
    > >before. They are still eaten in Germany, I believe.

    >
    >
    > Suffed helzel. My mother made that whenever we had a stuffed chicken
    > or turkey. Goose would have been better, but she never made goose.
    >
    > She never made the kishka, either, that was purchased at the local
    > deli, if anyone wanted it.
    >
    > Boron


    http://www.jewish-food.org/cgi-bin/...cipes&maxfiles=100&maxlines=50&maxchars=10000

    http://tinyurl.com/b5jsk

    Sheldon
     
  12. Boron Elgar wrote:
    > On Sun, 15 Jan 2006 18:22:31 -0500, Margaret Suran
    > <[email protected]> wrote:


    >>
    >>Bubba Wise Guy, I believe I asked you about stuffed Goose necks
    >>before. They are still eaten in Germany, I believe.

    >
    >
    >
    > Suffed helzel. My mother made that whenever we had a stuffed chicken
    > or turkey. Goose would have been better, but she never made goose.
    >
    > She never made the kishka, either, that was purchased at the local
    > deli, if anyone wanted it.
    >
    > Boron



    I never heard it called helzel, but phonetically it does come out as
    Yiddish and German for Neck. Did you like it? What did your Mother
    use for the stuffing?
     
  13. Sheldon wrote:
    > Boron Elgar wrote:
    >
    >>Margaret Suran wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>Though we did not have Kischka in Vienna, we did have something
    >>>similar, something that was delicious: Stuffed Goose Neck. The skin
    >>>of the goose, cleaned of fat and any kind of gristle and stuffed with
    >>>bread, egg, herbs, Goose fat, perhaps some goose liver, I do not know
    >>>what the stuffing contained, but it was delicious. It was baked with
    >>>the Goose, until the skin was crispy crunchy and the stuffing was
    >>>fully cooked. The neck would be sliced and served as a side dish to
    >>>the Goose. We had Goose once a month, a necessity, since we needed
    >>>the Goose fat for cooking. I liked roasted Goose, but I loved the
    >>>roasted neck. Yet, thinking back, I never asked for a second slice.
    >>>There was plenty, Geese have long necks and my sister didn't want any.
    >>> I was a strange little girl. I hardly ever asked for anything.
    >>>
    >>>I attempted making it when I was married and I made a Goose. I could
    >>>not duplicate what I had eaten as a child.
    >>>
    >>>Bubba Wise Guy, I believe I asked you about stuffed Goose necks
    >>>before. They are still eaten in Germany, I believe.

    >>
    >>
    >>Suffed helzel. My mother made that whenever we had a stuffed chicken
    >>or turkey. Goose would have been better, but she never made goose.
    >>
    >>She never made the kishka, either, that was purchased at the local
    >>deli, if anyone wanted it.
    >>
    >>Boron

    >
    >
    > http://www.jewish-food.org/cgi-bin/...cipes&maxfiles=100&maxlines=50&maxchars=10000
    >
    > http://tinyurl.com/b5jsk
    >
    > Sheldon
    >


    What an interesting recipe site. Thank you.
     
  14. In article <1h94vyv.46v73e7ij30wN%[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Victor Sack) wrote:

    >
    > > Kishka is mostly bread crumbs or
    > > matzoh meal and flour and fat in casings.

    >
    > Only the present-day Jewish-American version of it. There used to be
    > lots of variations. "Kishka" is a Russian (and generally Slavonic) word
    > meaning "intestine" and the thing is actually a more-or-less generic
    > sausage.
    >
    > Bubba Wise-Guy


    In the case of the song, which is the subject of the thread, the context
    was Polish. This recipe is from the guy who's behind TheSausageMaker.com
    where I buy my sausage supplies. (Polish folks from Buffalo, NY.) It's
    not exactly kosher.


    Blood Sausage aka "Kiszka"
    (as in "Who Stole the Kishka?"- the famous Walt Solek tune)
    From _Great Sausage Recipes and Meat Curing_ by Rytek Kutas, kindly
    shared by Doug Allison from Decatur, GA on alt.music.polka
    Ingredients for 25 pounds

    8 ozs salt
    1 oz onion powder
    1 oz coarse black pepper
    0.25 oz marjoram
    0.25 oz ground allspice
    1 qt beef blood
    1 oz Prague Powder #1
    12.5 lbs pork snouts
    5 lbs pork tongues
    2.5 lbs pork skins
    5 lbs buckwheat groats or barley (cooked weight)
    All meats must be cooked for at least 2 hours then cooled. Grind all the
    meats through a 3/16" grinder plate.
    Place the buckwheat groats or barley in a container and cover with
    boiling water for at least 2 hours. Be sure you place a cover on the
    container to prevent too much heat from escaping. (You may cook either
    of these items until the volume is doubled.) Remove and let cool.
    After all the meats and groats have cooled, place in a mixer and add all
    the seasonings and blood, and mix well. Stuff into beef bungs or beef
    middles. Blood sausage is then cooked in 160 degrees F. water until the
    internal temperature reaches 152 degrees F. Remove from cooker and
    shower with cool water until the internal temperature is reduced to 110
    degrees F.; place in cooler for at least 24 hours.
    NOTE: Since there always seems to be some breakage in the sausage
    business, you may add whatever broken sausage you have to the above
    formula. This blood sausage is spiced quite heavily and will cover up
    most other spices. You may add up to 4 lbs of broken sausage to a 25 lb
    formula. Be sure you account for the salt already in the broken sausage.
     
  15. Boron Elgar

    Boron Elgar Guest

    On Sun, 15 Jan 2006 20:35:30 -0500, Margaret Suran
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >
    >Boron Elgar wrote:
    >> On Sun, 15 Jan 2006 18:22:31 -0500, Margaret Suran
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >>>
    >>>Bubba Wise Guy, I believe I asked you about stuffed Goose necks
    >>>before. They are still eaten in Germany, I believe.

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Suffed helzel. My mother made that whenever we had a stuffed chicken
    >> or turkey. Goose would have been better, but she never made goose.
    >>
    >> She never made the kishka, either, that was purchased at the local
    >> deli, if anyone wanted it.
    >>
    >> Boron

    >
    >
    >I never heard it called helzel, but phonetically it does come out as
    >Yiddish and German for Neck. Did you like it? What did your Mother
    >use for the stuffing?


    Matzoh meal, onions and schmaltz are all I remember. Maybe a bit of
    carrot.

    Boron
     
  16. RobinB.

    RobinB. Guest

    "Boron Elgar" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Sun, 15 Jan 2006 20:35:30 -0500, Margaret Suran
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >
    > >Boron Elgar wrote:
    > >> On Sun, 15 Jan 2006 18:22:31 -0500, Margaret Suran
    > >> <[email protected]> wrote:

    > >
    > >>>
    > >>>Bubba Wise Guy, I believe I asked you about stuffed Goose necks
    > >>>before. They are still eaten in Germany, I believe.
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> Suffed helzel. My mother made that whenever we had a stuffed chicken
    > >> or turkey. Goose would have been better, but she never made goose.
    > >>
    > >> She never made the kishka, either, that was purchased at the local
    > >> deli, if anyone wanted it.
    > >>
    > >> Boron

    > >
    > >
    > >I never heard it called helzel, but phonetically it does come out as
    > >Yiddish and German for Neck. Did you like it? What did your Mother
    > >use for the stuffing?

    >
    > Matzoh meal, onions and schmaltz are all I remember. Maybe a bit of
    > carrot.
    >
    > Boron


    That's funny....I never realized that kishka was a jewish dish as well. My
    dad's jewish - my mom catholic. My polish grandfather would make it - it
    was blood pudding or blood sausage. I still get it fresh for Easter every
    year. Robin
     
  17. Boron Elgar

    Boron Elgar Guest

    On Mon, 16 Jan 2006 13:59:57 -0500, "RobinB." <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >"Boron Elgar" <[email protected]> wrote in message


    >>
    >> Matzoh meal, onions and schmaltz are all I remember. Maybe a bit of
    >> carrot.
    >>
    >> Boron

    >
    >That's funny....I never realized that kishka was a jewish dish as well. My
    >dad's jewish - my mom catholic. My polish grandfather would make it - it
    >was blood pudding or blood sausage. I still get it fresh for Easter every
    >year. Robin


    It would be quite a different dish in Jewish cuisine than in other
    Eastern European cultures, though.

    Boron
     
  18. Victor Sack

    Victor Sack Guest

    Donald Martinich <[email protected]> wrote:

    > [email protected] (Victor Sack) wrote:
    > >
    > > Only the present-day Jewish-American version of it. There used to be
    > > lots of variations. "Kishka" is a Russian (and generally Slavonic) word
    > > meaning "intestine" and the thing is actually a more-or-less generic
    > > sausage.

    >
    > In the case of the song, which is the subject of the thread, the context
    > was Polish. This recipe is from the guy who's behind TheSausageMaker.com
    > where I buy my sausage supplies. (Polish folks from Buffalo, NY.) It's
    > not exactly kosher.
    >
    > Blood Sausage aka "Kiszka"

    [snip recipe]

    Indeed, but in Poland, too, there were/are more than one type of kiszka
    sausage. Also, consider the Hungarian "hurka" which, AFAIK, means
    exactly the same as "kishka/kishka", i.e. "intestine". There is liver
    hurka and blood hurka, but also white hurka, made with rice or cornmeal
    and spices. There may or may not be some meat there, too, depending on
    the recipe. Such recipes can be perfectly kosher.

    Victorw
     
  19. Victor Sack

    Victor Sack Guest

    Margaret Suran <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Here, when I first heard of it, it was called Stuffed Derma, not
    > Kischka.


    That is still often the case, the menu of the lamented 2nd Ave Deli
    having been one example.

    > Bubba Wise Guy, I believe I asked you about stuffed Goose necks
    > before. They are still eaten in Germany, I believe.


    Yes, gefüllter Gänsehals is a well known dish here, though not really
    popular anymore. You will have a hard time finding it in restaurants
    here, but people still occasionally cook it at home. There are many
    recipes.

    The dish is rather more popular in France. Cou d'oie farci au foie
    gras... ah!

    Bubba
     
  20. In article <1h9a5zs.9bakgp1gatdfkN%[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Victor Sack) wrote:

    >
    > Indeed, but in Poland, too, there were/are more than one type of kiszka
    > sausage. Also, consider the Hungarian "hurka" which, AFAIK, means
    > exactly the same as "kishka/kishka", i.e. "intestine". There is liver
    > hurka and blood hurka, but also white hurka, made with rice or cornmeal
    > and spices. There may or may not be some meat there, too, depending on
    > the recipe. Such recipes can be perfectly kosher.
    >
    > Victorw


    This does not surprise me. Usage in the world of food is wild and wooly!
    The words, kielbasa, kolbassy, kobasa, kobasica, all mean 'sausage' or
    it's diminutive in several Slavic languages. These more generic names,
    after migrating to the New World, often take on more specific meanings.
    Take 'kielbasa'- In most of the US it is a fairly consistent product
    which belies the variety which exists in Poland. And verbal anarchy
    reins when restaurant menus are created in my part of the world (CA, USA)

    D.M.
     
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