Anti Atkins

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by Derek F, Aug 21, 2003.

  1. Derek F

    Derek F Guest

    Anti-Atkins nutritionist working for flour millers
    Source: Daily Telegraph
    Date: 18/08/2003
    It has emerged that leading anti-Atkins diet nutritionist, Dr Susan Jebb,
    who is head of nutrition at the Medical Research Council, has been
    commissioned by the Flour Advisory Bureau to conduct research into the
    benefits of a high-carbohydrate diet. The Atkins diet, which has become
    enormously popular in recent years, advocates cutting down on carbohydrates
    and boosting protein intake. Dr Jebb's association with the Flour Advisory
    Bureau, an organisation devoted to the staple ingredient of one of the
    world's most popular carbohydrates, has raised eyebrows. The Fab has paid
    the Medical Research Council ?10,000 to conduct the study, but Dr Jebb
    denies that there is a conflict of interests
     
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  2. Derek F

    Derek F Guest

    "Derek F" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Anti-Atkins nutritionist working for flour millers
    > Source: Daily Telegraph
    > Date: 18/08/2003
    > It has emerged that leading anti-Atkins diet nutritionist, Dr Susan Jebb,
    > who is head of nutrition at the Medical Research Council, has been
    > commissioned by the Flour Advisory Bureau to conduct research into the
    > benefits of a high-carbohydrate diet. The Atkins diet, which has become
    > enormously popular in recent years, advocates cutting down on

    carbohydrates
    > and boosting protein intake. Dr Jebb's association with the Flour Advisory
    > Bureau, an organisation devoted to the staple ingredient of one of the
    > world's most popular carbohydrates, has raised eyebrows. The Fab has paid
    > the Medical Research Council ?10,000 to conduct the study, but Dr Jebb
    > denies that there is a conflict of interests
    >
    >

    The Atkins diet - good or bad?
    Source: The Times
    Date: 15/08/2003
    Another issue that has been hotly debated in the press this week is the
    Atkins diet - the immensely popular high-protein, low carbohydrate regime.
    The recent debate was sparked by the comments of Dr Susan Jebb, who
    indicated her concerns about the safety of the diet earlier in the week.
    Letters have been written to all the papers from devotees of the diet who
    praise it for its effectiveness, and one such letter is published today in
    The Times. Professor David Thomas, who says he lost some weight using the
    diet, argues that even modest obesity is unquestionably harmful to long-term
    wellbeing, and says that a possibly harmful short-term method to reduce
    this, such as the Atkins diet, is worth the risk.
     
  3. Derek F wrote:

    > "Derek F" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > Anti-Atkins nutritionist working for flour millers
    > > Source: Daily Telegraph
    > > Date: 18/08/2003
    > > It has emerged that leading anti-Atkins diet nutritionist, Dr Susan Jebb,
    > > who is head of nutrition at the Medical Research Council, has been
    > > commissioned by the Flour Advisory Bureau to conduct research into the
    > > benefits of a high-carbohydrate diet. The Atkins diet, which has become
    > > enormously popular in recent years, advocates cutting down on

    > carbohydrates
    > > and boosting protein intake. Dr Jebb's association with the Flour Advisory
    > > Bureau, an organisation devoted to the staple ingredient of one of the
    > > world's most popular carbohydrates, has raised eyebrows. The Fab has paid
    > > the Medical Research Council ?10,000 to conduct the study, but Dr Jebb
    > > denies that there is a conflict of interests
    > >
    > >

    > The Atkins diet - good or bad?
    > Source: The Times
    > Date: 15/08/2003
    > Another issue that has been hotly debated in the press this week is the
    > Atkins diet - the immensely popular high-protein, low carbohydrate regime.
    > The recent debate was sparked by the comments of Dr Susan Jebb, who
    > indicated her concerns about the safety of the diet earlier in the week.
    > Letters have been written to all the papers from devotees of the diet who
    > praise it for its effectiveness, and one such letter is published today in
    > The Times. Professor David Thomas, who says he lost some weight using the
    > diet, argues that even modest obesity is unquestionably harmful to long-term
    > wellbeing, and says that a possibly harmful short-term method to reduce
    > this, such as the Atkins diet, is worth the risk.


    Not if there are other diet approaches w/o the potential for harm.

    --
    Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD
    Board-Certified Cardiologist
    http://www.heartmdphd.com/
     
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