Anti-Seize or Grease??

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Randomchris, Jan 22, 2003.

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  1. Randomchris

    Randomchris Guest

    When building new components on a frame, is it best to use anti-seize or grease on threads? I'd
    heard that anti-seize is less likely to get washed away by water but it comes in such small tubes
    (the finish line ti prep stuff) that I thought it must be for specific parts....

    Also, are there any special considerations for using Ti bolts in Alu threads?

    cheers Chris
     
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  2. Random-<< When building new components on a frame, is it best to use anti-seize or grease
    on threads?

    Either will work, Antisieze seems more tenacious-less likely to wash off..

    << Also, are there any special considerations for using Ti bolts in Alu threads?

    Don't over torque and use antisieze. Or replace them with steel.

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  3. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    "RandomChris" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > When building new components on a frame, is it best to use anti-seize or grease on threads? I'd
    > heard that anti-seize is less likely to get washed away by water but it comes in such small tubes
    > (the finish line ti prep stuff) that I thought it must be for specific parts....
    >
    > Also, are there any special considerations for using Ti bolts in Alu threads?

    Titanium is extremely reactive when mated to another metal, urban myths about its being "inert"
    notwithstanding. Use anti sieze paste, available at any auto parts store in lifetime-supply 300g
    cans for $5~10. There are many brands with multiple features - any will do. (you don't care about
    temperature range for bicycle aplication)

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  4. Ajames54

    Ajames54 Guest

    On Sat, 18 Jan 2003 08:12:37 -0000, "RandomChris"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >When building new components on a frame, is it best to use anti-seize or grease on threads? I'd
    >heard that anti-seize is less likely to get washed away by water but it comes in such small tubes
    >(the finish line ti prep stuff) that I thought it must be for specific parts....

    Go to a good auto supply, a Volvo or Rover dealer and ask for copper grease ... it is the same thing
    as anti-seize and cost about 1/100 of the price.

    >
    >Also, are there any special considerations for using Ti bolts in Alu threads?

    Al and Ti is a very important place to use copper grease.
     
  5. Robin Hubert

    Robin Hubert Guest

    "Qui si parla Campagnolo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > << Also, are there any special considerations for using Ti bolts in Alu threads?
    >
    > Don't over torque and use antisieze. Or replace them with steel.

    Yes, yes, and the last bit most important.

    Robin Hubert
     
  6. Hobe123

    Hobe123 Guest

    I was taught to use anti-seize for non-moving contacts like seatposts, any threads, headset parts
    pressed into frame or onto fork crown, quill stems, etc. Grease is for moving contacts, i.e.
    bearings. Never had a problem in 30 years. Large tin or plastic bottle of anti-seize, enough to last
    for years of personal service on multiple bikes, is available at auto parts store for under $10.
     
  7. Al Davis

    Al Davis Guest

    RandomChris wrote:

    > When building new components on a frame, is it best to use anti-seize or grease on threads?

    I use plumber's pipe dope.
     
  8. Hugh088

    Hugh088 Guest

    I'm no engineer but I work in an industry that makes up a lot of threads, some over 100,000 ft/lbs.
    Grease is a lubricant, it allows you to make up the threads eaiser. Anti seize has the grease or
    carrier plus micro particles of some soft solid. The grease can wash out but these particles are
    compressed between the threads. When you want to remove the bolt these compressed soft particles
    shear (antiseize) and allow the part to screw out. They also help seal out water to prevent rust.
    Rust cancels whatever you put on the threads. I like to used plumbers tape or teflon grease on my
    bike. I have put the teflon paste on every metal to metal contact point on a crank to kill some
    noise that another guy had suffered with for years. worked great. Make sure you have anti seize
    under the head of the bolt as a lot of the torque is at this contact point rather then the threads.
    Titanium is a problem material. Someone suggested that it is reactive, I don't know about that but
    when it is cut rather then ground or polished it tends to leave microscopic wickers. These are like
    putting sand in the treads before you make them up. They don't unscrew easy or not at all. Since
    thay are jammed into the threads they tend to grip the threads so tight that when they are removed
    they gall or mechanically weld (not a true weld) themselves together. This will pull the threads
    right out of the materail they are cut into rather then unscrew. Like I said, I'm no engineer but
    if you keep these things in mind when you make up threads you should have no problems on a bike.
    One last thing get and use a torque wrench. It's easy to convince yourself you have the experience
    to get the right torque on a bolt, but it's just as easy to pick up a torque wrench and do it
    right. Chris

    "RandomChris" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > When building new components on a frame, is it best to use anti-seize or grease on threads? I'd
    > heard that anti-seize is less likely to get washed away by water but it comes in such small tubes
    > (the finish line ti prep stuff) that I thought it must be for specific parts....
    >
    > Also, are there any special considerations for using Ti bolts in Alu threads?
    >
    > cheers Chris
     
  9. Randomchris

    Randomchris Guest

    > << Also, are there any special considerations for using Ti bolts in Alu threads?
    >
    > Don't over torque and use antisieze. Or replace them with steel.

    Speaking of which...

    What is a good (beam) torque wrench for low torque fittings like handlebars clamps, mech hanger
    bolts, etc? The Park ones seem a little pricey for what they are.
     
  10. Randomchris

    Randomchris Guest

    A Muzi <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > "RandomChris" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > When building new components on a frame, is it best to use anti-seize or grease on threads? I'd
    > > heard that anti-seize is less likely to get
    washed
    > > away by water but it comes in such small tubes (the finish line ti prep stuff) that I thought it
    > > must be for specific parts....
    > >
    > > Also, are there any special considerations for using Ti bolts in Alu threads?
    >
    > Titanium is extremely reactive when mated to another metal, urban myths about its being "inert"
    > notwithstanding. Use anti sieze paste, available
    at
    > any auto parts store in lifetime-supply 300g cans for $5~10. There are
    many
    > brands with multiple features - any will do. (you don't care about temperature range for bicycle
    > aplication)

    Is Copper Slip the same stuff? Looks the same as the Ti anti-seize I have (dirty gold and pasty).

    Would this go for any non-moving contact point, then? For example, I have a splined BB with a Ti
    axle. The Park Tools website says you should normally grease a splined BB axle. Presumably this is
    to stop the (usually steel) axle and (alu) crank seizing and nothing to do with seating it
    correctly?
     
  11. RandomChris wrote:
    >
    > A Muzi <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > "RandomChris" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > When building new components on a frame, is it best to use anti-seize or grease on threads?
    > > > I'd heard that anti-seize is less likely to get
    > washed
    > > > away by water but it comes in such small tubes (the finish line ti prep stuff) that I thought
    > > > it must be for specific parts....
    > > >
    > > > Also, are there any special considerations for using Ti bolts in Alu threads?
    > >
    > > Titanium is extremely reactive when mated to another metal, urban myths about its being "inert"
    > > notwithstanding. Use anti sieze paste, available
    > at
    > > any auto parts store in lifetime-supply 300g cans for $5~10. There are
    > many
    > > brands with multiple features - any will do. (you don't care about temperature range for bicycle
    > > aplication)
    >
    > Is Copper Slip the same stuff? Looks the same as the Ti anti-seize I have (dirty gold and pasty).
    >
    > Would this go for any non-moving contact point, then? For example, I have a splined BB with a Ti
    > axle. The Park Tools website says you should normally grease a splined BB axle. Presumably this is
    > to stop the (usually steel) axle and (alu) crank seizing and nothing to do with seating it
    > correctly?

    Antiseize will be fine for this. Personally I would use antiseize for that interface, but as a
    practical matter, grease is likely to work just fine.
     
  12. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    > > "RandomChris" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > When building new components on a frame, is it best to use anti-seize
    or
    > > > grease on threads? I'd heard that anti-seize is less likely to get
    > washed
    > > > away by water but it comes in such small tubes (the finish line ti
    prep
    > > > stuff) that I thought it must be for specific parts....
    > > >
    > > > Also, are there any special considerations for using Ti bolts in Alu threads?

    > A Muzi <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > Titanium is extremely reactive when mated to another metal, urban myths about its being "inert"
    > > notwithstanding. Use anti sieze paste,
    available
    > at
    > > any auto parts store in lifetime-supply 300g cans for $5~10. There are
    > many
    > > brands with multiple features - any will do. (you don't care about temperature range for bicycle
    > > aplication)

    "RandomChris" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Is Copper Slip the same stuff? Looks the same as the Ti anti-seize I have (dirty gold and pasty).
    >
    > Would this go for any non-moving contact point, then? For example, I have
    a
    > splined BB with a Ti axle. The Park Tools website says you should normally grease a splined BB
    > axle. Presumably this is to stop the (usually steel) axle and (alu) crank seizing and nothing to
    > do with seating it correctly?

    I'm not big on any titanium spindle - - BB , pedals, all of them are unsafe IMHO.

    but since you didn't ask me about that - if you've got one, yes use anti-seize.

    I don't know the Copper Slip brand - does it say "anti-seize" on it? The usual anti-seize
    application is for exhaust manifold bolts and exhaust systems - places where bolts corrode from
    heat especially with dissimilar metals. Anything intended for that would be just fine here. Maybe
    ask the vendor?
    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  13. Olivers

    Olivers Guest

    Try this link:

    http://www.sandsmachine.com/ac_greas.htm

    S and S Machine makes torque couplings for frames so that they can be disassembled and fit into
    airline size cases for air travel. They are adamant about using Dupont pure Teflon grease on the
    threads to avoid seizing, and give their test results in the above URL and the linked pages to prove
    their case.

    RandomChris wrote:
    > When building new components on a frame, is it best to use anti-seize or grease on threads? I'd
    > heard that anti-seize is less likely to get washed away by water but it comes in such small tubes
    > (the finish line ti prep stuff) that I thought it must be for specific parts....
    >
    > Also, are there any special considerations for using Ti bolts in Alu threads?
    >
    > cheers Chris
    >
    >

    --
    Cheers! OliverS When replying personally, remove "_removespam_"

    "When I see an adult on a bicycle, I do not despair for the future of the human race." HG Wells
     
  14. Lincoln Ross

    Lincoln Ross Guest

    I use food grade anti seize. Probably doesn't work any different from the other stuff, but neater
    and no metal in it. Left over from my last job. It was pretty cheap, but I don't remember exactly
    where it came from. My first guess was McMaster-Carr, but they only sell to companies.

    ajames54 wrote:
    >
    > On Sat, 18 Jan 2003 08:12:37 -0000, "RandomChris"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >When building new components on a frame, is it best to use anti-seize or grease on threads? I'd
    > >heard that anti-seize is less likely to get washed away by water but it comes in such small tubes
    > >(the finish line ti prep stuff) that I thought it must be for specific parts....
    >
    > Go to a good auto supply, a Volvo or Rover dealer and ask for copper grease ... it is the same
    > thing as anti-seize and cost about 1/100 of the price.
    >
    > >
    > >Also, are there any special considerations for using Ti bolts in Alu threads?
    >
    > Al and Ti is a very important place to use copper grease.

    --
    Lincoln Ross NOTE ADDRESS CHANGE: [email protected]
     
  15. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs Guest

    For esoteric anti seize compounds you might want to try the following two companies: either GRAINGER or BROWNELLS. The latter is America's pre-eminent gunsmithing supply firm. (And please don't give me **** posting the latter.)

    Otherwise, contact a local machine shop who may be able to best advise you on your application.

    As to TORQUE WRENCHES, Snap-On Tools sells probably the most expensive ones. You're dollars and headaches ahead by purchasing one from them . And it had better be the micrometer style as opposed to the cheap pointer one. And I mean it.
     
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