Anti-seize question



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Tony R

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Evening all, I've been using a lithium zinc grease as anti-seize but just came across an unexplained
exhortation to not use lithium based anti-seize (in Haynes). Anyone know the latest state of play on
this front? Thanks in advance, Tony R.
 
R

Rory

Guest
"tony R" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> Evening all, I've been using a lithium zinc grease as anti-seize but just came across an
> unexplained exhortation to not use lithium based anti-seize (in Haynes). Anyone know the latest
> state of play on this front? Thanks in advance,

I think the main problem with lithium grease is it washes out easily, so is best used in completely
sealed bearings. I use the copper grease that Halfrods sell in a tub for car disc brake pads (the
backs of them I would hope), works a treat.
 
D

David Nutter

Guest
tony R <[email protected]> said:
> Evening all, I've been using a lithium zinc grease as anti-seize but just came across an
> unexplained exhortation to not use lithium based anti-seize (in Haynes). Anyone know the latest
> state of play on this front? Thanks in advance, Tony R.

It washes out or dries up over time and therefore loses its protective effect. To contrast, I have
an aerosol can of brake anti-seize compound that can be applied to something, that something heated
in direct flame until it glows then left to cool and afterwards the compound is still mostly intact.
Try that with regular grease!

Generally you can get away with grease in non-critical areas (like fork crown reflector bolts or
cantilever mounting bolts) but for installing bottom brackets etc antiseize is better.

For example on my recently constructed bike I used the spray on the bottom bracket area, seatpin and
the derailleur mounting screws and grease elsewhere, mainly because the antiseize is so tenacious
that the frame was getting covered with horrible silver finger-marks.

Regards,

-david
 
P

Pete Biggs

Guest
tony R wrote:
> I've been using a lithium zinc grease as anti-seize but just came across an unexplained
> exhortation to not use lithium based anti-seize (in Haynes). Anyone know the latest state of play
> on this front?

What components is it to be used on?

There is some confusion and controversy over the business of different/same metals seizing and
welding together, and what various greases can and can't do. Frankly, I haven't kept up with all
this, but see Google Groups for the rec.bicycles.tech archives.

Copper anti-seize is good for certain things because it contains lots of comparatively large solid
particles of metal which fill up and stay in threads to prevent corrosion or anything else occupying
that space.

I think lithium is just an additive (used in tiny quantities) so the grease is not actually
based on it.

~PB
 
T

Tony R

Guest
"Pete Biggs" <pLime{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> tony R wrote:
> > I've been using a lithium zinc grease as anti-seize but just came across an unexplained
> > exhortation to not use lithium based anti-seize (in Haynes). Anyone know the latest state of
> > play on this front?
>
> What components is it to be used on?

Stem, seatpost, derailleur mounting bolt, crank fixing bolts, chainring fixing bolts.

> There is some confusion and controversy over the business of different/same metals seizing and
> welding together, and what various greases can and can't do. Frankly, I haven't kept up with all
> this, but see Google Groups for the rec.bicycles.tech archives.

Yes, I'm generally dazed and confused by it all. I was hoping someone on urc might be less so.

> Copper anti-seize is good for certain things because it contains lots of comparatively large solid
> particles of metal which fill up and stay in threads to prevent corrosion or anything else
> occupying that space.

This sounds promising as I bought some coppery stuff today. It's produced for car disk brakes
(thanks for the tip Rory). Although I'm sure someone posted here alleging that copper anti-seize
might actually promote corrosion. I hope I or they are wrong. I use synthetic grease in
hub/headset/pedal bearings and someone once told me that has a bad reputation too. Oh well.
Cheers, Tony R.
 
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Dave Kahn

Guest
"Pete Biggs" <pLime{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> wrote in message
news:<[email protected]>...

> > .....I bought some coppery stuff today. It's produced for car disk brakes (thanks for the tip
> > Rory).
>
> That's probably cheaper than "Ti Prep" - which is similar stuff sold for bicycles.

A good business to get into would be to buy 40 gallon drums of stuff and repackage it in tiny pots
to sell to cyclists. I suspect one or two companies may already be doing something along these
lines. :)

> Possibly apart from copper anti-seize, no grease will harm _bearings_ - it's just a question of
> how long it lasts and how thick it is. Good bearing grease is often synthetic. But some general
> purpose grease is still made from boiled up fish heads and the like by the smell of it

Any grease that's good enough to use in a car wheel bearing will be good enough to use in any
bearing on your bike. I've even used Vaseline successfully in my hubs although a) it isn't
really grease,
b) people will tell you you mustn't do it, and c) I'm not recommending anyone else to do the same,
just pointing out that I seem to have got away with it.

--
Dave...
 
C

ccalver

Guest
As I understand it you shouldnt use a Lithium based grease on any alloy part because it reacts
with it like welding it over time - thats why you should use eg a copper based grease on the
seat post etc
 
D

Dave Kahn

Guest
[email protected] wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> As I understand it you shouldnt use a Lithium based grease on any alloy part because it reacts
> with it like welding it over time - thats why you should use eg a copper based grease on the seat
> post etc

Some authorities say that you should not use lithium grease as anti-seize between an alloy part and
a steel one for this reason. Others claim this is nonsense. Either way this would not apply to its
use in a bearing.

--
Dave...
 
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