Any Amp B4 service gurus here?

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Nate, Dec 22, 2003.

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  1. Nate

    Nate Guest

    My girly has an Amp B4 and the rear triangle has lateral play to it. She has the pivot kits and
    extra rear triangle parts, but I cannot figure out how to remove the main pivot axle without
    possibly damaging something. Her maintenance manuals don't cover it, and I can't get the info from
    the Amp website.

    If anyone has any info to offer it would be greatly appreciated.

    n
     
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  2. Miles Todd

    Miles Todd Guest

    Nate wrote:
    > My girly has an Amp B4 and the rear triangle has lateral play to it. She has the pivot kits and
    > extra rear triangle parts, but I cannot figure out how to remove the main pivot axle without
    > possibly damaging something. Her maintenance manuals don't cover it, and I can't get the info from
    > the Amp website.
    >
    > If anyone has any info to offer it would be greatly appreciated.
    >
    > n

    I used to have an AMP. I changed out the pivots and bushings a lot, so maybe I can help, but it has
    been a long time, so maybe not. As I recall, the main pivot is a simple rod that has grooves on each
    end for circlips. Is yours the same?

    Miles
     
  3. Nate

    Nate Guest

    miles todd <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Nate wrote:
    > > My girly has an Amp B4 and the rear triangle has lateral play to it. She has the pivot kits and
    > > extra rear triangle parts, but I cannot figure out how to remove the main pivot axle without
    > > possibly damaging something. Her maintenance manuals don't cover it, and I can't get the info
    > > from the Amp website.
    > >
    > > If anyone has any info to offer it would be greatly appreciated.
    > >
    > > n
    >
    >
    > I used to have an AMP. I changed out the pivots and bushings a lot, so maybe I can help, but it
    > has been a long time, so maybe not. As I recall, the main pivot is a simple rod that has grooves
    > on each end for circlips. Is yours the same?
    >
    > Miles

    I don't have grooves on the axle rod, but it seems that "circlips" fit around the simple axle rod
    into the swingarm pivot. It appears that the axle is tight to the main frame and the swingarm pivots
    around it.

    n
     
  4. Miles Todd

    Miles Todd Guest

    Nate wrote:
    > miles todd <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    >>Nate wrote:
    >>
    >>>My girly has an Amp B4 and the rear triangle has lateral play to it. She has the pivot kits and
    >>>extra rear triangle parts, but I cannot figure out how to remove the main pivot axle without
    >>>possibly damaging something. Her maintenance manuals don't cover it, and I can't get the info
    >>>from the Amp website.
    >>>
    >>>If anyone has any info to offer it would be greatly appreciated.
    >>>
    >>>n
    >>
    >>
    >>I used to have an AMP. I changed out the pivots and bushings a lot, so maybe I can help, but it
    >>has been a long time, so maybe not. As I recall, the main pivot is a simple rod that has grooves
    >>on each end for circlips. Is yours the same?
    >>
    >>Miles
    >
    >
    > I don't have grooves on the axle rod, but it seems that "circlips" fit around the simple axle rod
    > into the swingarm pivot. It appears that the axle is tight to the main frame and the swingarm
    > pivots around it.
    >
    > n

    I seem to remember that it simply slides out (with a little coercion). Make sure that there is no
    set-screw or something like that, but I doubt your frame has anything along those lines. Mine
    didn't, but then again, mine was the seventh AMP ever made, and they made a few changes during the
    years. The pioneering thing about the AMP frame is that it was light. Really light, when other
    suspension frames were tanks. It is still lighter than almost any current design. Horst Leitner
    used the approach that the simplest, lightest solution is the best. Therefore, simple aluminum
    pivot rods.

    Anyhow, tap it out. Use your new rod as a punch, and as the old pivot is sliding out your new one
    will be taking its place.

    I found that White lightning on the various pivots was fantastic foe extending the life of the
    bushing spacers as well as keeping it all quiet.

    I wish I still had the shock rebuild tools- I'd send them to you. Unfortunately, I had no need for
    them after somebody swiped my bike out of my garage... so I pitched them.

    Miles
     
  5. Nate

    Nate Guest

    > Make sure that there is no set-screw or something like that, but I doubt your frame has anything
    > along those lines. Mine didn't, but then again, mine was the seventh AMP ever made, and they made
    > a few changes during the years.

    2 little screws directly holding the axle.

    > The pioneering thing about the AMP frame is that it was light. Really light, when other suspension
    > frames were tanks. It is still lighter than almost any current design. Horst Leitner used the
    > approach that the simplest, lightest solution is the best. Therefore, simple aluminum pivot rods.

    I'm guessing her small B4 is about 4.7 according to other size frame weights.

    > Anyhow, tap it out. Use your new rod as a punch, and as the old pivot is sliding out your new one
    > will be taking its place.

    Did that, but I wanted to replace the metal sleeves that fit into the holes of the swingarm. I only
    got 1 of the 2 sleeves in, so that will have to do for now.

    > I found that White lightning on the various pivots was fantastic foe extending the life of the
    > bushing spacers as well as keeping it all quiet.

    I second that. Maybe Lizard Skins woulda made some bux if they would have made something for
    Amp pivots...

    > I wish I still had the shock rebuild tools- I'd send them to you. Unfortunately, I had no need for
    > them after somebody swiped my bike out of my garage... so I pitched them.
    >
    > Miles

    Sorry to hear bout the loss of your bike. Bike thieves rank right up there with terrorists (or darn
    close anyway) in my book. We switched her shock over to a Risse Astro 5, and it has worked well.
    It's almost time to rebuild it though.

    I ended up adding a washer on the axle between the frame and the swingarm to help reduce lateral
    play. Also added some home fabricated washers made from plastic milk carton to the rear pivots to
    fill some minor gappage. After it was all put back together, I gotta say it has zero lateral play --
    for now. A huge improvement from the inch or so of play at the back wheel! Thank God for that! No
    need to purchase that new frame we were so close to getting, and the little lady is very happy with
    the results!

    Thanks for the help Miles!

    Nate
     
  6. Miles Todd

    Miles Todd Guest

    Nate wrote:

    >
    > Thanks for the help Miles!
    >
    > Nate

    I wish I could have helped more. I'm glad you are happy with the bike- I loved mine.

    Miles
     
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