Any benefits of a Carbon crank?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by novetan, Oct 29, 2012.

  1. novetan

    novetan New Member

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    Any advise is there a clear advantage of a carbon crank vs a steel crank? I know some riders of Tour De France are using it. What’s the estimated weight difference per arm that warrant the change.
     
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  2. davereo

    davereo Well-Known Member

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    Compare your current crank with the one you are planning on replacing it with. With out knowing any of this information no one can offer you any reasonable reply about weight savings.
     
  3. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    Do you mean aluminum crank? How much weight difference warrants a change depends on what you want. Note that any weight difference isn't going to make a huge or likely even a noticeable performance difference.
     
  4. daveryanwyoming

    daveryanwyoming Well-Known Member

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    Almost any commercially sold carbon crank is much, much lighter than a STEEL crank. However, neither TDF riders nor your average amateur cyclist has ridden steel cranks for a few decades. High end road bikes are sold with aluminum alloy cranks these days and have been for many years now.

    High end carbon cranks are typically a bit lighter then high end alloy cranks and carbon can be manufactured in some interesting shapes which can be useful for aero crank designs like on TT bikes. Carbon cranks typically look pretty bling and I'm sure that sells a lot of them.

    But clear advantage? Hard to say, they're unlikely to actually make your bike ride any faster, they may reduce a bit of weight as would not topping up your water bottles, they'll look pretty nice but you'll pay for that look. It all depends on your own budget and aesthetics but don't expect the bike to rocket forward and go a lot faster just because you changed from a set of of alloy cranks to carbon cranks.

    -Dave
     
  5. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    Comparing apples to apples...or something close.

    A forged aluminum Campagnolo Veloce Crankset with 170 MM length arms and 39/53 chainrings weighs 758 grams.

    A carbon fiber Campagnolo Super Record Crankset with 170 MM length arms and 39/53 chainrings weighs 584 grams.

    The weight savings from changing from Campagnolo's least expensive and heaviest aluminum crankset to their most expensive and lightest carbon fiber model is 174 grams or roughly 6 ounces.

    Is it 'worth' it? For 3x the price increase?

    Only you can answer for you, but for many riders it certainly is.

    Note: One can buy very lightweight aluminum cranksets. A shimaNO Dura-Ace unit is only 603 grams. A Cannondale Hollowgram can weigh as little as 485 grams.
     
  6. novetan

    novetan New Member

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    Sorry, what I meant was alu crank.

    You hv provided great info on the figures. Tks so much.
     
  7. dominikk85

    dominikk85 New Member

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    I would agree with that. 200 grams is not a lot and will cost you a lot of bucks. of course saving 200g at the cranks will likely gain you moreperformance than saving 200g on a frame because it is a moving part but still I think unless you are a TDF rider it is just not necessary.
     
  8. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    With pretty damned small moment of inertia and a very small rotational speed, the energy required to speed up a crank that is 200g heavier will almost be guaranteed to unnoticeable.
     
  9. 531Aussie

    531Aussie Well-Known Member

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    Hmm, I figure a better comparison is comparing carbon to more 'blinger' alu, like Dura-Ace. According to Competitive Cyclist, the aluminium Dura-Ace 7900 crankset is only 50g heavier than Record carbon (625g vs 675g)
     
  10. oscacom

    oscacom New Member

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    Only a bit of weight . DuraAce 7900 is a light weight group.
    Price difference enter aluminium and carbon components are important to gain only a few weight.
     
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