Any Brompton owners out there?

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Graeme Dods, Mar 19, 2006.

  1. Graeme Dods

    Graeme Dods Guest

    I'm sure I've not heard anyone on this group mention, even in passing, if
    they owned a Brompton, but if there are any such people who've been hiding
    this fact from us, could you give me some help/opinions please?

    The financial controller shocked me the other day when she asked if I would
    need a new bike for cycling to work. Clearly she has realised that not a
    single one of my 3 current bikes are suitable ;) She also mentioned that as
    I'll need the car for work (which I'll leave at the office) and might feel
    like taking the train in at times, that a folding bike might be the way to
    go :D

    So now I've got the theoretical approval, it's research time! Clearly I'd
    like to go for something with all/most of the whistles and bells (the
    latter being compulsory over here), i.e. hub dynamo, 6 gears etc. but other
    than that I'm a bit lost. The Australian distributors, Greenspeed
    (manufacturers of some very fine recumbents[1]) currently list only T, L &
    C models, whereas the Brompton site lists C, M, S & P models.

    The P model looks good, but are the 6 gears a must over the 3 (it's fairly
    flat around here)? And what's a Brommy like for lanky gits (6'2")?

    Thanks,

    Graeme

    [1] Who knows, maybe permission to buy one of these may be forthcoming if
    the insanity continues :)
     
    Tags:


  2. vernon

    vernon Guest

    > I'm sure I've not heard anyone on this group mention, even in passing, if
    > they owned a Brompton, but if there are any such people who've been hiding
    > this fact from us, could you give me some help/opinions please?
    >

    You can't have been here long then :)

    There's been quite a few Brompton stories that have unfolded in the
    past.year or so ;-)
     
  3. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    Graeme Dods wrote:
    >
    > The P model looks good, but are the 6 gears a must over the 3 (it's fairly
    > flat around here)? And what's a Brommy like for lanky gits (6'2")?
    >


    Generally the 3 gears are enough for flat places. The six gears are
    best used as two sets of three gears, a high range for normal use and a
    low range for use on the hills. I have a 3 gear and I'm getting a new 3
    gear soon. Generally I would suggest what was the L3 with the front
    luggage (I prefer the shopping basket to throw my stuff in, others
    prefer using a B bag as a briefcase). The rack adds weight when you are
    carrying it.

    For lanky gits its fine - I'm 4" taller than you and have no problems.
    You may need the telescopic post and you want the M or P type bars, the
    S type will be too low.

    The AVC site is good for looking at all the build options now available
    http://www.foldingbikes.co.uk/brompton.htm


    --
    Tony

    "The best way I know of to win an argument is to start by being in the
    right."
    - Lord Hailsham
     
  4. In article <[email protected]>, Graeme Dods wrote:
    >
    >The P model looks good, but are the 6 gears a must over the 3 (it's fairly
    >flat around here)?


    "must" - no, some people commute happily on single speeds. "worthwhile",
    depends on you.


    > And what's a Brommy like for lanky gits (6'2")?


    I'm 6'3" and found one with the standard seatpost practically unrideable,
    but longer seatposts are available as an option.
     
  5. Graeme Dods <[email protected]>typed



    > I'm sure I've not heard anyone on this group mention, even in passing, if
    > they owned a Brompton, but if there are any such people who've been hiding
    > this fact from us, could you give me some help/opinions please?



    I have loved the Bromptons I have bought. I can't ride now myself, due to MS.

    First one (T3, c1993) went to nephew, who was 12 at the time.

    I bought another one for my partner last year (T6, just before they
    renamed and respecified the range).

    Nobody told you ZisGuy bought a Brompton last year, did they? It
    folds-unfolds-folds-unfolds...

    Zis Guy is tall (6'1" or 6'2" IIRC) and has some lovely kit on his
    Brompton: Brook's Brompton saddle, SON dynamo etc. LOVELY!

    --
    Helen D. Vecht: [email protected]
    Edgware.
     
  6. David Hansen

    David Hansen Guest

    On Mon, 20 Mar 2006 12:23:36 +0800 someone who may be Graeme Dods
    <[email protected]> wrote this:-

    >The Australian distributors, Greenspeed
    >(manufacturers of some very fine recumbents[1]) currently list only T, L &
    >C models, whereas the Brompton site lists C, M, S & P models.


    The distributor is behind the times. Brompton changed their range at
    least a year ago, probably two.

    >The P model looks good, but are the 6 gears a must over the 3 (it's fairly
    >flat around here)?


    Three gears are usually fine in such conditions.

    >And what's a Brommy like for lanky gits (6'2")?


    The telescopic seat post might be of use.


    --
    David Hansen, Edinburgh
    I will *always* explain revoked encryption keys, unless RIP prevents me
    http://www.opsi.gov.uk/acts/acts2000/00023--e.htm#54
     
  7. Steve W

    Steve W Guest

  8. M-gineering

    M-gineering Guest

    Tony Raven wrote:
    > Graeme Dods wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> The P model looks good, but are the 6 gears a must over the 3 (it's
    >> fairly
    >> flat around here)? And what's a Brommy like for lanky gits (6'2")?
    >>

    >
    > Generally the 3 gears are enough for flat places. The six gears are
    > best used as two sets of three gears, a high range for normal use and a
    > low range for use on the hills.


    ??? The derailleur gears have a spread of about half the steps of the
    threespeed. They are not meant to increase the range, but halve the gaps
    of the threespeed hub.


    --
    ---
    Marten Gerritsen

    INFOapestaartjeM-GINEERINGpuntNL
    www.m-gineering.nl
     
  9. On Mon, 20 Mar 2006 12:23:36 +0800, Graeme Dods
    <[email protected]> said in
    <[email protected]>:

    >The P model looks good, but are the 6 gears a must over the 3 (it's fairly
    >flat around here)? And what's a Brommy like for lanky gits (6'2")?


    I agree with Tony that 3 is enough on the flat, but disagree on mode
    of usage: I go up through the six gears in sequence even on flat
    ground.

    Height no object, but do get the telescopic seat post. In titanium.
    Mmmmm! titanium! Where's my credit card?

    Guy
    --
    May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting.
    http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

    85% of helmet statistics are made up, 69% of them at CHS, Puget Sound
     
  10. daren

    daren Guest

    Graeme Dods wrote:
    > I'm sure I've not heard anyone on this group mention, even in passing, if
    > they owned a Brompton, but if there are any such people who've been hiding
    > this fact from us, could you give me some help/opinions please?
    >
    > The financial controller shocked me the other day when she asked if I would
    > need a new bike for cycling to work. Clearly she has realised that not a
    > single one of my 3 current bikes are suitable ;) She also mentioned that as
    > I'll need the car for work (which I'll leave at the office) and might feel
    > like taking the train in at times, that a folding bike might be the way to
    > go :D
    >
    > So now I've got the theoretical approval, it's research time! Clearly I'd
    > like to go for something with all/most of the whistles and bells (the
    > latter being compulsory over here), i.e. hub dynamo, 6 gears etc. but other
    > than that I'm a bit lost. The Australian distributors, Greenspeed
    > (manufacturers of some very fine recumbents[1]) currently list only T, L &
    > C models, whereas the Brompton site lists C, M, S & P models.
    >
    > The P model looks good, but are the 6 gears a must over the 3 (it's fairly
    > flat around here)? And what's a Brommy like for lanky gits (6'2")?
    >


    I love my L6, I have an extended seatpost but am 2" shorter than you.
    You will need the longer adjustable post.

    I use the six gears sequentially. I have the 12% gear reduction and
    would strongly recommend this option - you can always cost down really
    big hills.

    Pick black, easy to touch up (and it will get scratched), rather than
    the pink and titanium grey I saw walking out of Warlands, Oxford.

    I have personally sold four to group members here at work. They are
    more common than Mazda 6's!

    regards,
    daren
    --
    remove outer garment for reply
     
  11. Ric

    Ric Guest

    "Graeme Dods" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    You will definitely need the telescopic seatpost option - standard seatpost
    is only suitable for mildly elongated dwarves.

    Get the "Vitesse" seat - the standard seat is only suitable for grannies.

    If you live in a flat place, gearing is not so critical and three speed
    should be ok. Single is ok if you only ride very short distances but I
    imagine would become very tedious if you ride more than a few kms.

    The Bromson hub-dynamo is an excellent option - particularly if you match it
    to DIWA lights.

    I have a Brompton T6 with all the above options and it is the best thing I
    have ever spent money on (except my Rohloff on another bike, and beer of
    course).
     
  12. davek

    davek Guest

    Graeme Dods wrote:
    > The financial controller shocked me the other day when she asked if I would
    > need a new bike for cycling to work.


    I had a similar conversation this morning. Except it was me that raised
    the matter - I've been putting off getting a folder on cost grounds but
    using the Tube for the past three weeks has been too depressing.
    (Besides, I think I can get away with putting it on my tax return as a
    business expense.)

    > The P model looks good, but are the 6 gears a must over the 3 (it's fairly
    > flat around here)? And what's a Brommy like for lanky gits (6'2")?


    There's lots of stuff in the archives about this - I know because I
    spent most of the morning reading it. What I have learnt is:
    * number of gears is less of an issue than gearing range - many people
    find the standard gearing too high, so it is a good idea to go for the
    reduced gearing unless you live in a very flat area.
    * if you are taller than 5'8" you may be wise to opt for the extended
    seatpost.

    Personally, I have set my mind on an S-type (flat handlebars, slightly
    "sportier" ride) with the standard three hub gears. I'd really like the
    SON hub but will make do with the standard bottle dynamo if the
    financial controller balks at the price of the SON. However, since I
    have fitted a SON to my other bike, I am leaning towards thinking of it
    as an /essential/ feature rather than a luxury.

    I shall be spending most of tomorrow morning down at the local Brompton
    dealer working out the finer details. :)

    d.
     
  13. "Ric" <[email protected]>typed



    > "Graeme Dods" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]


    > You will definitely need the telescopic seatpost option - standard seatpost
    > is only suitable for mildly elongated dwarves.


    Thanks ;-)
    It's fine for me and my partner, but we are fairly averagely
    proportioned; I'd term neither of us a s 'mildly elongated dwarves',
    though...

    --
    Helen D. Vecht: [email protected]
    Edgware.
     
  14. Rod King

    Rod King Guest

    Graeme

    Well, I am not a Brompton owner, but did try one out for a week before
    buying a folder. I am 6ft tall and what I found was the the Brompton was
    great for transporting but rather tedious for cycling. I think it all comes
    down to the balance you have between the two.

    Those who are always on trains and lugging their bikes up and down stairs
    will definately go for the Brompton. Others who will occasionally fold their
    bikes and use on trains could well find a 20" wheeled folder much better as
    an all round folder. In the end I bought a Giant Halfway which I have found
    excellent. It folds reasonably small and can go in the back of the car or on
    a train easily. And it does have a much better riide than the 17" wheeled
    Brompton.

    My advice would be to try one out alongside a Giant or Dahon 20" folder.

    It will be like Vegemite. You will either love or hate the Brompton.

    Best regards


    Rod King

    On recumbent your feet don't touch the ground.




    "Graeme Dods" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > I'm sure I've not heard anyone on this group mention, even in passing, if
    > they owned a Brompton, but if there are any such people who've been hiding
    > this fact from us, could you give me some help/opinions please?
    >
    > The financial controller shocked me the other day when she asked if I

    would
    > need a new bike for cycling to work. Clearly she has realised that not a
    > single one of my 3 current bikes are suitable ;) She also mentioned that

    as
    > I'll need the car for work (which I'll leave at the office) and might feel
    > like taking the train in at times, that a folding bike might be the way to
    > go :D
    >
    > So now I've got the theoretical approval, it's research time! Clearly I'd
    > like to go for something with all/most of the whistles and bells (the
    > latter being compulsory over here), i.e. hub dynamo, 6 gears etc. but

    other
    > than that I'm a bit lost. The Australian distributors, Greenspeed
    > (manufacturers of some very fine recumbents[1]) currently list only T, L &
    > C models, whereas the Brompton site lists C, M, S & P models.
    >
    > The P model looks good, but are the 6 gears a must over the 3 (it's fairly
    > flat around here)? And what's a Brommy like for lanky gits (6'2")?
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Graeme
    >
    > [1] Who knows, maybe permission to buy one of these may be forthcoming if
    > the insanity continues :)
     
  15. Jim Price

    Jim Price Guest

    davek wrote:
    > * number of gears is less of an issue than gearing range - many people
    > find the standard gearing too high, so it is a good idea to go for the
    > reduced gearing unless you live in a very flat area.


    I get on fine with the standard gearing, although I also ride a fixed
    gear in the Welsh mountains, so it may be a bit much for some people.

    > * if you are taller than 5'8" you may be wise to opt for the extended
    > seatpost.


    The extended seatpost is only about two inches longer than the standard,
    and I find I'm only an inch from the top of the range on the extended
    post. I'm only 5'8 3/4", but I like a fairly extended leg position. As
    and when I change the saddle for something a bit better than the
    standard Brommie saddle, I'll probably lose an inch of saddle height and
    have to pull the seatpost right out to its limit to get the right riding
    position.

    JimP
     
  16. congokid

    congokid Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Ric
    <[email protected]> writes

    >Get the "Vitesse" seat - the standard seat is only suitable for grannies.


    The standard seat on my Brompton fell apart before its first 12 months
    had elapsed. That's what happens when you have a backside hardened
    through years on a Brooks saddle.

    --
    congokid
    Eating out in London? Read my tips...
    http://congokid.com
     
  17. badger

    badger Guest

    Graeme Dods wrote:
    > I'm sure I've not heard anyone on this group mention, even in passing, if
    > they owned a Brompton, but if there are any such people who've been hiding
    > this fact from us, could you give me some help/opinions please?


    Yes, great machine but not all alike, my L3 lives in the land-rover most
    of the time and I use it as an "in-line wheel-chair" to get around
    campus, the much new T models are wonderful, but too much for my needs,
    try before you buy would be my advice.

    Niel.
     
  18. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    M-gineering wrote:
    > Tony Raven wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >> Generally the 3 gears are enough for flat places. The six gears are
    >> best used as two sets of three gears, a high range for normal use and
    >> a low range for use on the hills.

    >
    > ??? The derailleur gears have a spread of about half the steps of the
    > threespeed. They are not meant to increase the range, but halve the gaps
    > of the threespeed hub.
    >


    That's as may be but sequencing through them that way is complex
    sequence of left and right changers and requires good memory or looking
    at the gear indicators to see which change comes next. Most people I
    know use just three gears at a time with the left changer to select a
    high or low range of three (except for the lucky ones with an old 5
    speed). YMMV

    --
    Tony

    "The best way I know of to win an argument is to start by being in the
    right."
    - Lord Hailsham
     
  19. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Graeme Dods wrote:

    > So now I've got the theoretical approval, it's research time! Clearly I'd
    > like to go for something with all/most of the whistles and bells (the
    > latter being compulsory over here), i.e. hub dynamo, 6 gears etc. but other
    > than that I'm a bit lost. The Australian distributors, Greenspeed
    > (manufacturers of some very fine recumbents[1]) currently list only T, L &
    > C models, whereas the Brompton site lists C, M, S & P models.


    As has been said, this is a bit behind the times, but it could be they
    just haven't updated their website. Drop them a line.

    > The P model looks good, but are the 6 gears a must over the 3 (it's fairly
    > flat around here)?


    Depends how optimised you like your cycling. For the short hacks I use
    my L3 for I'm not too fussed, and with plenty of hills to play with use
    a 3 with the 18% step down (smaller ring, bigger sprocket). The 6 gives
    you half spaces so you can be nearer a sweet spot, but if you're a
    trundlier sort of chap like me then it's mainly just something extra to
    clean, lube and have go wrong in exchange for arriving 30 seconds
    earlier. But you could optimise your speed much better with a Birdy in
    any case, and not pay /too/ much in the fold.

    Last visit to Kinetics I was chatting with Darth Ben about Schlumpfs,
    and he said he was expecting a Brom-sized version of the new Sturmey 8
    speed in some time not too distant. This would look to be a much better
    solution all around, though exact timnings and availability are still
    rather up in the air.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  20. Graeme Dods

    Graeme Dods Guest

    Thanks to everyone who responded, even the cat lovers ;)

    The local distributor is most likely to be up to date with their actual
    models, it's probably just their web site (which also seems to have lost
    all reference to their wonderful convertable tandem/solo recumbent trike :(
    I need to find somewhere reasonably local so I can do a test ride, trouble
    is that Perth isn't local to anywhere but Perth.

    I was leaning towards the 3 speed anyway, as I've been toying with the idea
    of building a fixie then 3 instead of 6 shouldn't be a problem in
    comparison :)

    I'll definitely give the Birdy and Dahon a look. I think they're a lot more
    common (and cheaper) over here anyway, I'm just drawn to the wonderful
    design of the Brompton (the engineer in me I'm afraid).

    And Pete, why did you have to mention the 8 speed hub? That's just cruel
    taunting you know! :)

    Graeme
     
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