any electric bicycles on the market with good RANGE ?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Misterfact, Apr 14, 2004.

  1. Misterfact

    Misterfact Guest

    If so-what kind of batteries do they have? (I suppose you
    could carry an extra charged battery pack)

    [email protected]
     
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  2. Chalo

    Chalo Guest

    [email protected] (misterfact) wrote:

    > If so-what kind of batteries do they have? (I suppose you
    > could carry an extra charged battery pack)

    If you want maximum range per pound of batteries, NiMH cells
    are best, but they are pretty expensive. Most electric-
    assist bikes using NiMh batteries do so in order to reduce
    weight, rather than to extend range.

    Giant LA Free Lite bikes use a battery cartridge similar to
    that of a cordless power tool, but larger. It weighs 9
    pounds, so you could conceivably carry some more along. At
    250W, that bike has lower consumption than most, and it
    features a range-extending economy mode in its power
    management system:

    http://www.electricbikes.bigstep.com/main/lite.htm

    Lead-acid cells still offer the best range per dollar cost
    of batteries, but at the expense of pack weight. Trying to
    extend the range of a lead-acid powered elecric-assist bike
    could result in a craft with bicycle-type power pushing a
    motorcycle's weight.

    Some lead-acid cells (e.g. Hawker) and some NiCd cells can
    be charged at incredible rates, like 15 minutes from
    depleted to full capacity. That battery characteristic, and
    a willingness to tote the requisite charger, could allow
    extended range if there were places to plug in along your
    route. Electricmoto use this design feature for their battery-
    powered motocrosser:

    http://www.electricmoto.com/blade.htm

    I have heard of some EV folks experimenting with lithium ion
    batteries, but I know of no applicable commercial product.
    If one were to come available, it could raise maximum range
    beyond what's available otherwise, but still not into the
    all-day ride range.

    It appears that electric-assist bicycles with cross-country
    range will have to wait for affordable, compact fuel cells,
    or else a much better battery than is now available.

    Chalo Colina
     
  3. Ralph

    Ralph Guest

    Well, we've got LAFree Lites which while heavier than most
    road bikes are pretty decent bikes without the power on. It
    seems to me that the goal is to use the power only on hills
    and just pedal the rest of the time. Once I get my cadence
    up I think an 8 speed hub would be a good thing, the 4 speed
    is a bit limited on the top end.

    "Chalo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > [email protected] (misterfact) wrote:
    >
    > > If so-what kind of batteries do they have? (I suppose
    > > you could carry an extra charged battery pack)
    >
    > If you want maximum range per pound of batteries, NiMH
    > cells are best, but they are pretty expensive. Most electric-
    > assist bikes using NiMh batteries do so in order to reduce
    > weight, rather than to extend range.
    >
    > Giant LA Free Lite bikes use a battery cartridge similar
    > to that of a cordless power tool, but larger. It weighs 9
    > pounds, so you could conceivably carry some more along. At
    > 250W, that bike has lower consumption than most, and it
    > features a range-extending economy mode in its power
    > management system:
    >
    > http://www.electricbikes.bigstep.com/main/lite.htm
    >
    > Lead-acid cells still offer the best range per dollar cost
    > of batteries, but at the expense of pack weight. Trying to
    > extend the range of a lead-acid powered elecric-assist
    > bike could result in a craft with bicycle-type power
    > pushing a motorcycle's weight.
    >
    > Some lead-acid cells (e.g. Hawker) and some NiCd cells can
    > be charged at incredible rates, like 15 minutes from
    > depleted to full capacity. That battery characteristic,
    > and a willingness to tote the requisite charger, could
    > allow extended range if there were places to plug in along
    > your route. Electricmoto use this design feature for their
    > battery-powered motocrosser:
    >
    > http://www.electricmoto.com/blade.htm
    >
    > I have heard of some EV folks experimenting with lithium
    > ion batteries, but I know of no applicable commercial
    > product. If one were to come available, it could raise
    > maximum range beyond what's available otherwise, but still
    > not into the all-day ride range.
    >
    > It appears that electric-assist bicycles with cross-
    > country range will have to wait for affordable, compact
    > fuel cells, or else a much better battery than is now
    > available.
    >
    > Chalo Colina
     
  4. Cheg

    Cheg Guest

    "Ralph" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Chalo" <[email protected]> wrote
    > >
    > > Giant LA Free Lite bikes use a battery cartridge similar
    > > to that of a cordless power tool, but larger. It weighs
    > > 9 pounds, so you could conceivably carry some more
    > > along. At 250W, that bike has lower consumption than
    > > most, and it features a range-extending economy mode in
    > > its power management system:
    > >
    > > http://www.electricbikes.bigstep.com/main/lite.htm
    >
    > Well, we've got LAFree Lites which while heavier than most
    > road bikes are pretty decent bikes without the power on.
    > It seems to me that the goal is to use the power only on
    > hills and just pedal the rest of the time. Once I get my
    > cadence up I think an 8 speed hub would be a good thing,
    > the 4 speed is a bit limited on the top end.
    >

    You can improve the top-end on the Nexus 4 speed by simply
    changing the sprocket, if you don't mind working a bit
    harder at the low end. I think the standard sprocket on the
    LAFree Lite is a 20, but you can use an 18 or a 16. The
    range of the LAFree Lite is about 20 miles on continuous low
    power in moderately hilly conditions, but of course YMMV. At
    some point, the faster you go the less power you use because
    the power rolls off at about 18 MPH. At 48 lbs. it's not
    light, but it is a really nice well made bike (for the non-
    purist). Sometimes you want to ride but don't want to bust
    your ass on the hills. It's also great for someone getting
    used to riding in traffic.
     
  5. Define "good."

    I think that for many people, a range of 10 miles is good,
    since it's good enough to get to work, where you can charge
    it for the return home.

    Look at the Dahon Roo EL, as well as the Giant being
    mentioned. http://dahon.com/rooel.htm. The Roo may be more
    suitable for people that have limitations on full size bikes
    in their workplace.

    "misterfact" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > If so-what kind of batteries do they have? (I suppose you
    > could carry an extra charged battery pack)
    >
    >
    > [email protected]
     
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