Any experience with Hawaiian Airlines and what travel bag is best

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by mikesaif, Oct 3, 2012.

  1. mikesaif

    mikesaif New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2010
    Messages:
    25
    Likes Received:
    0
    I am planning on a trip from the U.S. to Australia next year with Hawaiian Airlines and wondered if anyone had any experience of traveling with them and taking the bike as check in baggage? Looks like a fee of $200 each way for "Sporting Equipment" but I know some people can be pretty inventive when it comes to traveling with their bike.

    Also looking for recommendations of what is the best case/bag to buy for packing a bike.

    Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.
     
    Tags:


  2. vspa

    vspa Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2009
    Messages:
    2,203
    Likes Received:
    39
    im just coming back from an airplane-bike holiday, in the go trip i didn't take out the handlebars (quite an easy operation) and both my ultegra sti levers were damaged, mines have a name-plate that covers the cable installation just for esthetics so those i had to glue them back in as a result. 200 usd each way seems a bit high but on the other hand it gives you a receipt that can help you out if anything is broken or lost. My bag is really soft material but regardless of the quality of the bag the basic considerations are to: obviously take out your wheels, de-inflate them, install 2 hubs or 2 axles (on the wheels place) to protect your fork and your rear frame triangle, take out the rear mech, protect your big chainring with your chain for example (tighting it up with an inner tube for example), taking out your seatpost is not really neccesary except if your dissassembled bike is not fitting in your bag, but on second thoughts mark with tape its position and take it out... the way to use most bags is to put the bike in the middle and one wheel on each side of it with the cassette looking to the inside of course,
     
  3. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2004
    Messages:
    12,596
    Likes Received:
    160
    You don't have to deflate the tires. Planes are typically pressurized to a pressure altitude of 10,000ft or so. If the tires were going to blow off, they would do so because the difference pressure between the inside and outside of the tire was too great. However, the difference in air pressure between sea level and 10,000ft is only about 10.1 psi or 0.7 bar. Pressure also changes with temperature, and the cargo holds of airliners aren't typically heated. That means that the temperature will be lower, and thus pressure in the tire will go down.
     
  4. vspa

    vspa Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2009
    Messages:
    2,203
    Likes Received:
    39
    ok correction taken :)
     
  5. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2005
    Messages:
    11,945
    Likes Received:
    1,036
    With the baggage gorillas able to totally abuse, steal and crush anything this side of a blacksmith's anvil (even then, I would insure with Lloyd's!)...a bike bag offers only slightly better protection than wrapping your bike in a paper towel.

    I would suggest investing in a quality hard case. I would also look into shipping your bike ahead, UPS or such (not cheap, either, but they have a better track record in the damage department and offer insurance and a better claims handling rep).

    Just MHO.

    The last time the bagage chimps got ahold of one of my bikes it was only $50/each way to give them the privilege of molesting it. $200?!?! Wow...things have gone up a bit.
     
Loading...
Loading...