Any good onion soup recipes??



F

Ferrante

Guest
I am looking for a good onion soup recipe, something simple, with not to many fancy
ingredients. If anyone has one to share, I would certainly appreciate it. Also, hopefully it
can be done in a crockpot!

One more thing: what is the best type of cheese to top the soup with. A friend tells me that
provolone is the way to go. Is it?

Thanks, Mark Ferrante
 
V

Victor Sack

Guest
FERRANTE <[email protected]> wrote:

> I am looking for a good onion soup recipe, something simple, with not to many fancy ingredients.

Here's a recipe from _Bistro Cooking_ by Patricia Wells. The recipe comes from the famous Pied de
Cochon brasserie in Paris. I posted it before.

Victor

Soupe à l'Oignon Pied de Cochon
Pied de Cochon's Onion Soup

1 very large (1 pound; 500 g) white onion (such as Bermuda), thinly sliced 2 cups (50 cl) dry white
wine, such as Muscadet or Mâcon-Villages 2 tablespoons (1 ounce; 30 g) unsalted butter 6 cups (1.5
l) unsalted chicken stock, preferably homemade 6 slices crusty baguette 2 cups (about 5 ounces; 160
g) freshly grated imported French or Swiss Gruyère cheese

1. Preheat the oven to 425°F (220°C).

2. Combine the onion, wine, and butter in a baking dish and braise, uncovered, until the onion
is very soft and most of the liquid is absorbed, about 45 minutes. Increase the oven
temperature to broil.

3. Meanwhile, bring the stock to a simmer in a large, non-reactive saucepan.

4. Evenly distribute the cooked onions among 6 deep, round soup bowls. Pour in the simmering stock.
Place a round of bread on top of each; evenly distribute the grated cheese. Place the soup bowls
under the broiler and broil just until the cheese is melted and nicely gratinéed, 2 or 3 minutes.
Serve immediately.

Yield: 6 servings
 
V

Vox Humana

Guest
"FERRANTE" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> I am looking for a good onion soup recipe, something simple, with not to many fancy ingredients.
> If anyone has one to share, I would certainly appreciate it. Also, hopefully it can be done in a
> crockpot!
>
> One more thing: what is the best type of cheese to top the soup with. A friend tells me that
> provolone is the way to go. Is it?
>
> Thanks, Mark Ferrante

This one is good: http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/recipes/recipe/0,,FOOD_9936_156,00.html

I don't know if you can caramelize onions in a crock pot. The procedure for this one recommend an
electric skillet set at 300F. If the crock pot won't get that hot, you could do the onion on the
range top and complete it in the crock pot.
 
D

Dimitri

Guest
"FERRANTE" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> I am looking for a good onion soup recipe, something simple, with not to many fancy ingredients.
> If anyone has one to share, I would certainly appreciate it. Also, hopefully it can be done in a
> crockpot!
>
> One more thing: what is the best type of cheese to top the soup with. A friend tells me that
> provolone is the way to go. Is it?
>
> Thanks, Mark Ferrante

Crock-pot onion soup: # 1

1 qt. beef bouillon or stock 2 to 3 c. sliced onion
1/4 c. butter 1 tsp. Worcestershire sauce 2 tbsp. flour
2/4 c. dry vermouth or white wine (optional) 1 1/2 tsp. salt

Pour bouillon in crock pot. Cover and set on high. Cook onions slow in large skillet in butter.
Cover and let cook 15 minutes. Add remaining ingredients to onions. Stir well and add to stock in
crock pot. Cover and cook on low 6 to 8 hours or 3 hours on high.

# 2

1 qt. beef bouillon or brown stock 3 c. thinly sliced yellow onions
3/4 c. sugar
4/4 c. butter 1 c. Parmesan cheese 1 1/2 tsp. salt 2 tbsp. flour

Pour bouillon or stock in crock pot; cover and set on high. Cook onions slowly in large skillet in
butter. Cover and cook for about 15 minutes. Uncover and add salt, sugar and flour. Stir well. Add
to stock in crock pot. Cover and cook on low 6-8 hours or on high 3 hours. Before serving, add
grated cheese.

Dimitri
 
Z

Zxcvbob

Guest
FERRANTE wrote:

> I am looking for a good onion soup recipe, something simple, with not to many fancy ingredients.
> If anyone has one to share, I would certainly appreciate it. Also, hopefully it can be done in a
> crockpot!
>
> One more thing: what is the best type of cheese to top the soup with. A friend tells me that
> provolone is the way to go. Is it?
>
> Thanks, Mark Ferrante

I generally use Julia Child's recipe from an old French Chef paperback cookbook. I don't have it
handy; maybe I can find it tonight. The hardest part is making the good brown stock first. IIRC, the
onions are sauteed in butter, then you add a little flour to make a roux, then add stock and 1 cup
of red wine and simmer for a rather long time.

I think I've used parmesian cheese before, and swiss cheese. Provelone might be good, but messy.

Best regards, Bob
 
S

Sam D.

Guest
"FERRANTE" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> I am looking for a good onion soup recipe, something simple, with not to many fancy ingredients.
> If anyone has one to share, I would certainly appreciate it. Also, hopefully it can be done in a
> crockpot!
>
> One more thing: what is the best type of cheese to top the soup with. A friend tells me that
> provolone is the way to go. Is it?

Here are the recipes from two restaurants known for their onion soup. One can be made quickly and
the other is an extended time process. I have tried them and thought they were both very good. You
could use the crockpot for the long simmering required in the Hamlet recipe but it wouldn't be of
much use otherwise. The cheese you use is really just a matter of personal preference. I prefer
Swiss but I'm sure provolone would be fine also. The recipe from Mimi's suggests either Gruyere,
Mozzarella, Swiss, Parmesan, or any combination of these. The Hamlet recipe calls for jack cheese.

MIMI'S CAFE FRENCH ONION SOUP

1 Oz Butter (2 tablespoons) 2 Lb Yellow Onions, halved and sliced 1/2" wide 2 Quarts Homemade Beef
Stock OR 4 Cans (14oz) Beef Broth + 1 can Beef Consomme (undiluted)
l/4 Cup freshly grated Romano Cheese Salt & freshly ground Black Pepper, to taste

Melt the butter in a heavy-bottomed pot and saute the onions over medium-low heat until they soften
and turn golden brown (keep stirring and adjust the heat so they don't burn). Add the beef stock and
simmer 10 minutes. Whisk the grated cheese into the soup and season with salt and pepper to taste.

To serve French Onion Soup au gratin pour into oven proof soup crocks. Top with toasted, sliced
French bread and sliced or grated cheese (Gruyere, Mozzarella, Swiss or Parmesan, or any combination
thereof). Broil until the cheese melts and carefully remove from the oven. (Serves 6-8)

HAMBURGER HAMLET ONION SOUP FONDUE

3/4 cup sweet real butter 4 to 6 large onions, thinly sliced 2 quarts beef broth 1 teaspoon seasoned
chicken stock base White pepper, to taste Round French or sourdough bread, sliced 1-inch thick
Jack cheese slices, 1 ounce each Garlic toast

In a large kettle, melt butter, add onions and sauté until transparent but not browned. Add beef
broth and chicken base. Cover and simmer 2-3 hours. Remove from heat and allow to stand overnight.
The next day, remove and discard fat. Reheat and season to taste with pepper. Meanwhile, lightly
toast bread slices and top with 5-6 slices of Jack cheese. Place soup in ovenproof individual
serving dishes and top with bread slices. Place soup under broiler just until cheese bubbles and is
soft but not browned. Serve with garlic toast on the side. Makes 12 servings.
 
M

Melba'S Jammin

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, FERRANTE
<[email protected]> wrote:

> I am looking for a good onion soup recipe, something simple, with not to many fancy ingredients.
> If anyone has one to share, I would certainly appreciate it. Also, hopefully it can be done in a
> crockpot!
>
> One more thing: what is the best type of cheese to top the soup with. A friend tells me that
> provolone is the way to go. Is it?
>
> Thanks, Mark Ferrante

Notes: This from the Mpls Star Tribune 11/2000 and see that it may be coming from a syndicated thing
by Alicia Ross and Whatshername. I stir the onions a few times while they're cooking. It's really
good -- I've made it more than once.
_____
Recipes: Frantic French Onion Soup, Slow-Cooker Caramelized Onions Published November 2, 2000
Frantic French Onion Soup Serves 4.
* 2 (141/2-oz.) cans beef broth
* 1 (141/2-oz.) can fat-free chicken broth
* 1/4 c. dry Sherry
* 1 tbsp. Worcestershire sauce
* 1/2 tsp. bottled minced garlic
* 1/4 tsp. dried thyme
* 2 c. caramelized onions with juice (see recipe)
* 2 c. plain, butter-flavored or garlic-flavored croutons
* 4 deli slices (about 4 oz.) Swiss cheese
* 4 tsp. Parmesan cheese, or more to taste Place a broiler rack 6 inches from the heat, and turn on
the broiler.

Remove fat from the beef broth and pour the broth into a 41/2-quart Dutch oven or soup pot over high
heat. Add the chicken broth, Sherry, Worcestershire, garlic and thyme. Stir well. Cover the pot and
bring it to the boil.

Meanwhile, place 4 ovenproof bowls on a large baking sheet and set aside.

When the broth boils, add the caramelized onions and cover. Reduce the heat to medium and boil for 1
minute to incorporate the onion flavor. Remove the pot from the heat.

Divide the soup among 4 bowls and sprinkle each bowl with 1/2 cup croutons. Lay a cheese slice over
the croutons. Sprinkle each cheese slice with 1 teaspoon Parmesan cheese (or more to taste). Place
the baking sheet under the broiler for 1 minute or until the cheese melts. Using pot holders, serve
at once, making sure to warn diners that the bowls will be very hot.

Nutrition information per serving: Calories346, Carbohydrates27 g, Protein17 g, Fat18 g, including
sat. fat8 g, Cholesterol33 mg, Sodium1,711 mg, Calcium0 mg, Dietary fiber3 g

Slow-Cooker Caramelized Onions

Makes 3 cups.

Leftover onions may be refrigerated, covered, up to three days. They may be frozen up to one month.

* 6 large onions (for about 6 c. of slices)
* 2 tbsp. olive oil

Peel the onions and cut them into 1/4-inch slices. Place the onions in a slow cooker, and drizzle
oil over the slices.

Place the lid on the cooker and turn it to High. Cook 8 to 10 hours, until the onions caramelize.
They will have a deep brown color.

Nutrition information per 1/4-cup serving: Calories48, Carbohydrates7 g, Protein1 g, Fat2 g,
including sat. fat0 g, Cholesterol0 mg, Sodium2 mg, Calcium0 mg, Dietary fiber1 g
--
-Barb, <www.jamlady.eboard.com> updated 1-31-04 A good friend will come and bail you out of jail; a
true friend will be sitting next to you saying, "Damn,that was fun!"
 
R

Richard Periut

Guest
Victor Sack wrote:

> FERRANTE <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>
>>I am looking for a good onion soup recipe, something simple, with not to many fancy ingredients.
>
>
> Here's a recipe from _Bistro Cooking_ by Patricia Wells. The recipe comes from the famous Pied de
> Cochon brasserie in Paris. I posted it before.
>
> Victor
>
> Soupe à l'Oignon Pied de Cochon
> Pied de Cochon's Onion Soup
>
> 1 very large (1 pound; 500 g) white onion (such as Bermuda), thinly sliced 2 cups (50 cl) dry
> white wine, such as Muscadet or Mâcon-Villages 2 tablespoons (1 ounce; 30 g) unsalted butter 6
> cups (1.5 l) unsalted chicken stock, preferably homemade 6 slices crusty baguette 2 cups (about 5
> ounces; 160 g) freshly grated imported French or Swiss Gruyère cheese
>
> 1. Preheat the oven to 425°F (220°C).
>
> 2. Combine the onion, wine, and butter in a baking dish and braise, uncovered, until the onion is
> very soft and most of the liquid is absorbed, about 45 minutes. Increase the oven temperature
> to broil.
>
> 3. Meanwhile, bring the stock to a simmer in a large, non-reactive saucepan.
>
> 4. Evenly distribute the cooked onions among 6 deep, round soup bowls. Pour in the simmering
> stock. Place a round of bread on top of each; evenly distribute the grated cheese. Place the
> soup bowls under the broiler and broil just until the cheese is melted and nicely gratinéed, 2
> or 3 minutes. Serve immediately.
>
> Yield: 6 servings
Something is terribly wrong with this recipe; me thinks that what you end up with is soggy bread
with translucent onions. I don't see how the onions are going to caramelize when surrounded by so
much liquid??

I've eaten there in the 80's, and unless there are new owners that know next to nothing about
cooking, I don't think they serve that recipe.

Rich

--
---------------------------------------------------------------------

Dum spiro, spero. (Cicero) As long as I breathe, I hope.
 
H

Hahabogus

Guest
zxcvbob <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]
63726.news.uni-berlin.de:

> FERRANTE wrote:
>
>> I am looking for a good onion soup recipe, something simple, with not to many fancy ingredients.
>> If anyone has one to share, I would certainly appreciate it. Also, hopefully it can be done in a
>> crockpot!
>>
>> One more thing: what is the best type of cheese to top the soup with. A friend tells me that
>> provolone is the way to go. Is it?
>>
>> Thanks, Mark Ferrante
>
>
@@@@@ Now You're Cooking! Export Format

Vadalia Onion Chowder

soups

4 slices bacon -chopped bite sized; -not crumbled 2 tbsp olive oil; or use bacon fat 4 vadialia
onions; sliced 2-3 cups mashed potatoes (leftovers); I used 3 4 cloves garlic; minced 2 boxes
chicken stock (approx 30 oz) 2 cups corn kernels (I used 2 cans) 2 bay leaf; (optional)
1/4 tsp dried thyme fresh ground black pepper; LOTS salt to taste sour cream; see note*

Fry the bacon crisp. drain well the bacon and reserve. (Used later.) Heat oil in large pot. low
medium to med heat. Make the onions bite sized, add to pot, cook till tender, about 10 min. Mince
the garlic, add to pot, cook 1 minute or so more. Add broth, potatoes, corn, bay leaves, thyme.
Bring the soup to a boil. Remove the pot from the heat. Remove the bay leaves. Season with pepper.
Add sour cream. *Note add the sour cream just before serving by the tablespoon per bowl. This
freezes better without the sour cream. Serve in soup bowls, and sprinkle crumbled bacon on top. this
recipe needs more garlic than called for.
Note: I just stirred the crumbled bacon in with the whole batch. Don't be shy with the garlic. I
used some turkey Stock in with this (excellent.) Used 5 or 6 sweet onions 6-7 potatoes served
as mashed. I Didn't have vidalia onions so i used locally grown sweet onions instead. I added
a grated carrot for colour. I think some brocolli florets might be nice as well

Contributor: Alan Boles

** Exported from Now You're Cooking! v5.64 **

--
Once during Prohibition I was forced to live for days on nothing but food and water.
--------
FIELDS, W. C.
 
K

Katra

Guest
> "FERRANTE" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
> > I am looking for a good onion soup recipe, something simple, with not to many fancy ingredients.
> > If anyone has one to share, I would certainly appreciate it. Also, hopefully it can be done in a
> > crockpot!
> >
> > One more thing: what is the best type of cheese to top the soup with. A friend tells me that
> > provolone is the way to go. Is it?
> >
> > Thanks, Mark Ferrante
>

This is what I do.... I try to make it a habit to only post recipes that I come up with myself.
Apologies if it mimics any published ones. ;-)

I take one purple, one white and one yellow onion. Peel and chop and place them in a hot iron
skillet with a generous dollop of extra virgin olive oil and one half cube (2 oz) of unsalted
butter. Cook them uncovered over a medium heat until well wilted and are beginning to turn clear,
and while they are cooking, add about 1 tablespoon fresh ginger, grated, and about 1 tsp. garlic
powder and just a dash of ground pepper.

Once the onions are well wilted and beginning to brown, I add them to the Swansons canned beef stock
that I have pre-heated in a small stock pot. I use two cans, about 20 oz. for the three onions.

I take my soup cups and add about 1/8 cup of grated jack cheese to the bottom and then fill them
with the onion and stock mix, then top with about the same amount of cheese and some croutons.

This is easy, and does not last long in my house. <G>

Really good for flu's and colds too, but substitute minced fresh garlic if you are ill.

K.

--
Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<[email protected]>,,<
http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewSellersOtherItems&include=0&userid=katra
 
K

Katra

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
"Dimitri" <[email protected]> wrote:

> "FERRANTE" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
> > I am looking for a good onion soup recipe, something simple, with not to many fancy ingredients.
> > If anyone has one to share, I would certainly appreciate it. Also, hopefully it can be done in a
> > crockpot!
> >
> > One more thing: what is the best type of cheese to top the soup with. A friend tells me that
> > provolone is the way to go. Is it?
> >
> > Thanks, Mark Ferrante
>
> Crock-pot onion soup: # 1
>
> 1 qt. beef bouillon or stock 2 to 3 c. sliced onion
> 1/4 c. butter 1 tsp. Worcestershire sauce 2 tbsp. flour
> 1/4 c. dry vermouth or white wine (optional) 1 1/2 tsp. salt
>
> Pour bouillon in crock pot. Cover and set on high. Cook onions slow in large skillet in butter.
> Cover and let cook 15 minutes. Add remaining ingredients to onions. Stir well and add to stock
> in crock pot. Cover and cook on low 6 to 8 hours or 3 hours on high.

Sounds good but I'd substitute dry red wine. :)

>
> # 2
>
> 1 qt. beef bouillon or brown stock 3 c. thinly sliced yellow onions
> 1/4 c. sugar
> 1/4 c. butter 1 c. Parmesan cheese 1 1/2 tsp. salt 2 tbsp. flour
>
> Pour bouillon or stock in crock pot; cover and set on high. Cook onions slowly in large skillet in
> butter. Cover and cook for about 15 minutes. Uncover and add salt, sugar and flour. Stir well. Add
> to stock in crock pot. Cover and cook on low 6-8 hours or on high 3 hours. Before serving, add
> grated cheese.
>
>
> Dimitri

1/4 CUP sugar??? Ok, but sounds a bit sweet. Mom did teach me to use sugar to enrich some recipes,
but she usually stopped at 1 Tbs. per POT! Or a pan full of SOS. :)

K.
>
>

--
Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<[email protected]>,,<
http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewSellersOtherItems&include=0&userid=katra
 
K

Katra

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
Richard Periut <[email protected]> wrote:

> Victor Sack wrote:
>
> > FERRANTE <[email protected]> wrote:
> >
> >
> >>I am looking for a good onion soup recipe, something simple, with not to many fancy ingredients.
> >
> >
> > Here's a recipe from _Bistro Cooking_ by Patricia Wells. The recipe comes from the famous Pied
> > de Cochon brasserie in Paris. I posted it before.
> >
> > Victor
> >
> > Soupe à l'Oignon Pied de Cochon
> > Pied de Cochon's Onion Soup
> >
> > 1 very large (1 pound; 500 g) white onion (such as Bermuda), thinly sliced 2 cups (50 cl) dry
> > white wine, such as Muscadet or Mâcon-Villages 2 tablespoons (1 ounce; 30 g) unsalted butter 6
> > cups (1.5 l) unsalted chicken stock, preferably homemade 6 slices crusty baguette 2 cups (about
> > 5 ounces; 160 g) freshly grated imported French or Swiss Gruyère cheese
> >
> > 1. Preheat the oven to 425°F (220°C).
> >
> > 2. Combine the onion, wine, and butter in a baking dish and braise, uncovered, until the onion
> > is very soft and most of the liquid is absorbed, about 45 minutes. Increase the oven
> > temperature to broil.
> >
> > 3. Meanwhile, bring the stock to a simmer in a large, non-reactive saucepan.
> >
> > 4. Evenly distribute the cooked onions among 6 deep, round soup bowls. Pour in the simmering
> > stock. Place a round of bread on top of each; evenly distribute the grated cheese. Place the
> > soup bowls under the broiler and broil just until the cheese is melted and nicely gratinéed,
> > 2 or 3 minutes. Serve immediately.
> >
> > Yield: 6 servings
> Something is terribly wrong with this recipe; me thinks that what you end up with is soggy bread
> with translucent onions. I don't see how the onions are going to caramelize when surrounded by so
> much liquid??

It is possible to reduce that in a skillet, I'd sure as heck not use the oven???

>
> I've eaten there in the 80's, and unless there are new owners that know next to nothing about
> cooking, I don't think they serve that recipe.
>
> Rich

Never been there...

Damn. It's been awhile since I've made onion soup and the weather is cold and wet right now. I'm
gonna have to make some this weekend. :)

K.

--
Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<[email protected]>,,<
http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewSellersOtherItems&include=0&userid=katra
 
V

Victor Sack

Guest
PENMART01 <[email protected]> wrote:

> >(Victor Sack) wrote:
> >
> >Here's a recipe

I notice that, for some reason, you saw it fit to snip both the author, Patricia Wells, and the
source, the Pied de Cochon brasserie in Paris.

> >6 cups (1.5 l) unsalted chicken stock, preferably homemade
>
> Beef stock would be far more appropriate.

Appropriate where? There are many more traditional variations of 'French Onion Soup' made with
chicken stock, mixture of chicken and beef stock, or with plain water. Each of them, when made
right, is very good indeed. Beef stock versions, while certainly not unknown in France, are much
more popular in America. See, for example, <http://www.hertzmann.com/articles/2001/onion/>.

> >1. Preheat the oven to 425°F (220°C).
> >2. Combine the onion, wine, and butter in a baking dish and braise, uncovered,
>
> Braising necessitates covering... you go on to describe simmering the onion and butter in wine...
> I would suggest caramelizing the onion in the butter and blending the wine with the stock to be
> used in the next step

Good point. The onions do caramelise a bit, due to the relatively very long 'braising' of this
kind. The soup served at the restaurant is very tasty indeed, if not anywhere near the very best.
I made it at home a few times following the recipe and the results were better. The proof's in
the practice.

> >until the onion is very soft and most of the liquid is absorbed, about 45 minutes.
>
> Not absorbed, *reduced*.

Indeed. However, some wine is absorbed, too. One can still detect a bit of the wine taste in
the onions.

> Not a very a satisfactory recipe.

Try it, perhaps you'll change your opinion. Also see a review at
<http://www.registerguard.com/news/2004/01/28/e1.fd.onionsoup.0128.html>.

Victor
 
V

Victor Sack

Guest
Richard Periut <[email protected]> wrote:

> Victor Sack wrote:
>
> > Here's a recipe from _Bistro Cooking_ by Patricia Wells. The recipe comes from the famous Pied
> > de Cochon brasserie in Paris. I posted it before.
> >
> > Soupe à l'Oignon Pied de Cochon
> > Pied de Cochon's Onion Soup
> >
> Something is terribly wrong with this recipe; me thinks that what you end up with is soggy bread
> with translucent onions.

The bread is *supposed* to soak up a lot of liquid and swell up. The crusts do retain some of
their firmness, though. You won't find any other kind of French onion soup that can be called
remotely traditional, in this respect. The bread is never put in just before serving and there is
absolutely no way you can avoid it soaking up liquid, not even if you toast it to crispness. The
onions are not translucent - the very long cooking time (45 minutes) sees to that. They also do
take up some colour.

> I don't see how the onions are going to caramelize when surrounded by so much liquid??

Again, owing to the long cooking time, some caramelisation does take place. Too much caramelisation
is unwelcome - one doesn't want one's onion soup to taste sweet.

> I've eaten there in the 80's, and unless there are new owners that know next to nothing about
> cooking, I don't think they serve that recipe.

I've eaten there quite a few times over the past three decades and I can vouch that the preparation
has remained fairly standard throughout.

Victor
 
P

Penmart01

Guest
>(Victor Sack) wrote:
>
>FERRANTE wrote:
>
>> I am looking for a good onion soup recipe, something simple, with not to many fancy ingredients.
>
>Here's a recipe
>
>1 very large (1 pound; 500 g) white onion (such as Bermuda), thinly sliced 2 cups (50 cl) dry white
>wine, such as Muscadet or Mâcon-Villages 2 tablespoons (1 ounce; 30 g) unsalted butter 6 cups (1.5
>l) unsalted chicken stock, preferably homemade

Beef stock would be far more appropriate.

>6 slices crusty baguette 2 cups (about 5 ounces; 160 g) freshly grated imported French or Swiss
>Gruyère cheese
>1. Preheat the oven to 425°F (220°C).
>2. Combine the onion, wine, and butter in a baking dish and braise, uncovered,

Braising necessitates covering... you go on to describe simmering the onion and butter in wine... I
would suggest caramelizing the onion in the butter and blending the wine with the stock to be used
in the next step

>until the onion is very soft and most of the liquid is absorbed, about 45 minutes.

Not absorbed, *reduced*.

>Increase the oven temperature to broil.
>
>3. Meanwhile, bring the stock to a simmer in a large, non-reactive saucepan.
>
>4. Evenly distribute the cooked onions among 6 deep, round soup bowls. Pour in the simmering stock.
> Place a round of bread on top of each; evenly distribute the grated cheese. Place the soup bowls
> under the broiler and broil just until the cheese is melted

Not a very a satisfactory recipe.

---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =--- ---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =--- Sheldon
```````````` "Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
 
P

Penmart01

Guest
>Melba's Jammin'

>FERRANTE wrote:
>
>> I am looking for a good onion soup recipe, something simple,
>
>I've made it more than once.
>_____
>Recipes: Frantic French Onion Soup, Slow-Cooker Caramelized Onions Published November 2, 2000
>Frantic French Onion Soup Serves 4.
>* 2 (141/2-oz.) cans beef broth
>* 1 (141/2-oz.) can fat-free chicken broth
>* 1/4 c. dry Sherry
>* 1 tbsp. Worcestershire sauce
>* 1/2 tsp. bottled minced garlic
>* 1/4 tsp. dried thyme
>* 2 c. caramelized onions with juice (see recipe)
>* 2 c. plain, butter-flavored or garlic-flavored croutons
>* 4 deli slices (about 4 oz.) Swiss cheese
>* 4 tsp. Parmesan cheese, or more to taste

Not for nothing but I don't like my onion soup contaminated with garlic... and rather than
worcestershire it crys for black pepper... otherwise your recipe is a good one.

I have two favorite methods for onion soup; long and short. The long method involves browning and
simmering a largish chuck roast for hours... this produces a really rich beef stock to which I add a
truckload of very slowly caramelized onions, and yields a nice piece of boiled beef for slicing for
sammiches, with tomatoes and creamy horseradish dressing.

The short method entails canned beef broth and lots of Penzeys toasted sliced dehy onions. Most
folks, including moi, like the result of the short method better... the toasted dehys impart a more
intense onion flavor and have better texture.

---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =--- ---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =--- Sheldon
```````````` "Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
 
K

Katra

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
[email protected] (PENMART01) wrote:

> >(Victor Sack) wrote:
> >
> >FERRANTE wrote:
> >
> >> I am looking for a good onion soup recipe, something simple, with not to many fancy
> >> ingredients.
> >
> >Here's a recipe
> >
> >1 very large (1 pound; 500 g) white onion (such as Bermuda), thinly sliced 2 cups (50 cl) dry
> >white wine, such as Muscadet or Mâcon-Villages 2 tablespoons (1 ounce; 30 g) unsalted butter 6
> >cups (1.5 l) unsalted chicken stock, preferably homemade
>
> Beef stock would be far more appropriate.

Agreed! The flavor is drastically different and far more compatible. Ok so I cheat and used
canned, but I do have some emu demiglace in the freezer that is the consistancy of honey. Good
stuff maynard! I need to try that with beef next time. Takes time to make demiglace but well
worth it IMHO.

>
>
> >6 slices crusty baguette 2 cups (about 5 ounces; 160 g) freshly grated imported French or Swiss
> >Gruyère cheese
> >1. Preheat the oven to 425°F (220°C).
> >2. Combine the onion, wine, and butter in a baking dish and braise, uncovered,
>
> Braising necessitates covering... you go on to describe simmering the onion and butter in wine...
> I would suggest caramelizing the onion in the butter and blending the wine with the stock to be
> used in the next step

I've never added wine to my onion soup. How much and what type would you suggest Shel'? Merlot or
something equally as dry?

Good onion soup is an art and something that I really enjoy.

>
> >until the onion is very soft and most of the liquid is absorbed, about 45 minutes.
>
> Not absorbed, *reduced*.

<giggles>

>
> >Increase the oven temperature to broil.
> >
> >3. Meanwhile, bring the stock to a simmer in a large, non-reactive saucepan.
> >
> >4. Evenly distribute the cooked onions among 6 deep, round soup bowls. Pour in the simmering
> > stock. Place a round of bread on top of each; evenly distribute the grated cheese. Place the
> > soup bowls under the broiler and broil just until the cheese is melted
>
> Not a very a satisfactory recipe.

Then lets come up with a better one together. :) See my previous post and critique it please? i
like it, but am always open to suggestions.

Preferably one that avoids the oven! That's a pain in the tailfeathers...

K.

>
> ---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =--- ---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =--- Sheldon
> ```````````` "Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
>

--
Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

>,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<[email protected]>,,<
http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewSellersOtherItems&include=0&userid=katra
 
Z

Zxcvbob

Guest
PENMART01 wrote:
>
> I have two favorite methods for onion soup; long and short. The long method involves browning and
> simmering a largish chuck roast for hours... this produces a really rich beef stock to which I add
> a truckload of very slowly caramelized onions, and yields a nice piece of boiled beef for slicing
> for sammiches, with tomatoes and creamy horseradish dressing.

I usually use meaty beef bones for the stock. I sprinkle them with a little sugar to aid the
browning, and I roast them in a 400 degree oven until well browned. Then simmer for hours with
peppercorns and bayleaf and maybe a carrot (especially if I remember to roast the carrot.) I like
your idea of boiling a roast and using the meat for sandwiches. Thanks. I think I'll also include a
few rib bones or roundsteak bones though.

When I adjust the salt near the end, I use beef bouillon cubes instead of salt.

> The short method entails canned beef broth and lots of Penzeys toasted sliced dehy onions. Most
> folks, including moi, like the result of the short method better... the toasted dehys impart a
> more intense onion flavor and have better texture.

That would be hard to believe, except I think I read somewhere that Julia Child thinks the long
method is a lot of work and she prefers canned or dried onion soup. BTW, if you want the onions to
have texture when you get through, use white onions. If you want them to cook away and get almost
mushy, use yellow or red. (I like yellow.)

Long-cooked onions, canned beef broth, and a dash of vermouth or brandy might be a good compromise.

Best regards, Bob

--
Recipe for poached chicken: "First, you steal a chicken..."
 
M

Melba'S Jammin

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
[email protected] (PENMART01) wrote:

> >Melba's Jammin'
>
> >FERRANTE wrote:
> >
> >> I am looking for a good onion soup recipe, something simple,
> >
> >I've made it more than once.
> >_____
> >Recipes: Frantic French Onion Soup, Slow-Cooker Caramelized Onions Published November 2, 2000
> >Frantic French Onion Soup Serves 4.
> >* 2 (141/2-oz.) cans beef broth
> >* 1 (141/2-oz.) can fat-free chicken broth
> >* 1/4 c. dry Sherry
> >* 1 tbsp. Worcestershire sauce
> >* 1/2 tsp. bottled minced garlic
> >* 1/4 tsp. dried thyme
> >* 2 c. caramelized onions with juice (see recipe)
> >* 2 c. plain, butter-flavored or garlic-flavored croutons
> >* 4 deli slices (about 4 oz.) Swiss cheese
> >* 4 tsp. Parmesan cheese, or more to taste
>
> Not for nothing but I don't like my onion soup contaminated with garlic... and rather than
> worcestershire it crys for black pepper... otherwise your recipe is a good one.
>
> I have two favorite methods for onion soup; long and short. The long method involves browning and
> simmering a largish chuck roast for hours... this produces a really rich beef stock to which I add
> a truckload of very slowly caramelized onions, and yields a nice piece of boiled beef for slicing
> for sammiches, with tomatoes and creamy horseradish dressing.
>
> The short method entails canned beef broth and lots of Penzeys toasted sliced dehy onions. Most
> folks, including moi, like the result of the short method better... the toasted dehys impart a
> more intense onion flavor and have better texture.

> Sheldon
```````````` I don't remember if I used garlic or not, Sheldon. What I do remember is that, after I
caramelized the onions, I made up the soup as I went along -- and danged if what I conjured up
wasn't very close to the above that the paper offered, chiefly in the combination of beef and
chicken broths, the thyme, the Sherry, and the Worcestershire. Must'a been psychic.
--
-Barb, <www.jamlady.eboard.com> updated 1-31-04 A good friend will come and bail you out of jail; a
true friend will be sitting next to you saying, "Damn,that was fun!"
 
R

Richard Periut

Guest
Victor Sack wrote:

> Richard Periut <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>
>>Victor Sack wrote:
>>
>>
>>>Here's a recipe from _Bistro Cooking_ by Patricia Wells. The recipe comes from the famous Pied de
>>>Cochon brasserie in Paris. I posted it before.
>>>
>>> Soupe à l'Oignon Pied de Cochon
>>> Pied de Cochon's Onion Soup
>>>
>>
>>Something is terribly wrong with this recipe; me thinks that what you end up with is soggy bread
>>with translucent onions.
>
>
> The bread is *supposed* to soak up a lot of liquid and swell up. The crusts do retain some of
> their firmness, though. You won't find any other kind of French onion soup that can be called
> remotely traditional, in this respect. The bread is never put in just before serving and there is
> absolutely no way you can avoid it soaking up liquid, not even if you toast it to crispness. The
> onions are not translucent - the very long cooking time (45 minutes) sees to that. They also do
> take up some colour.
>
>
>>I don't see how the onions are going to caramelize when surrounded by so much liquid??
>
>
> Again, owing to the long cooking time, some caramelisation does take place. Too much
> caramelisation is unwelcome - one doesn't want one's onion soup to taste sweet.
>
>
>>I've eaten there in the 80's, and unless there are new owners that know next to nothing about
>>cooking, I don't think they serve that recipe.
>
>
> I've eaten there quite a few times over the past three decades and I can vouch that the
> preparation has remained fairly standard throughout.
>
> Victor
As long as there is wine in the pan, how will the onions caramelize?

Or do you let the wine evaporate?

French onion soup calls for very caramelized onions. At least most of the times I've eaten it in
French and quasi French restaurants both here and France.

Rich
--
---------------------------------------------------------------------

Dum spiro, spero. (Cicero) As long as I breathe, I hope.