Any way to make brake levers accessible from bar ends?

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Trentus, Feb 3, 2003.

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  1. Trentus

    Trentus Guest

    The subject pretty much says it all. I find holding the bar ends far more comfortable, and much
    greater control. I just can't control my SPEED while holding the bar ends, as I can't reach the
    brake levers. So for decents etc. where I want best control but also need brakes, I have to
    sacrifice some control by holding the handlebars direct instead so I can reach the brakes.

    Any suggestions? The handlebar grips don't easily allow for me to move the levers closer (though I
    haven't fully investigated this option, and that would also preclude ever being able to hold the
    handlebars and limit me to ONLY the bar ends which isn't ideal.

    Ideal would be some alternate brake levers, or extensions to the existing levers, maybe operated by
    just one or two fingers, that can be accessed from the bar ends.

    TIA

    Trentus
     
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  2. Bomba

    Bomba Guest

    Trentus wrote:
    > The subject pretty much says it all. I find holding the bar ends far more comfortable, and much
    > greater control. I just can't control my SPEED while holding the bar ends, as I can't reach the
    > brake levers. So for decents etc. where I want best control but also need brakes, I have to
    > sacrifice some control by holding the handlebars direct instead so I can reach the brakes.

    Hanging on to the bar ends whilst descending is not such a good idea. You're moving your body
    position further forward, in a situation where your weight should be further back. Ideally, I think
    you need to assess why you find it more comfortable to rest on the bar ends, and then adjust your
    stem / bar accordingly. Is it because they're wider? Is it because they're higher?

    You used to be able to get extensions to the brake levers many years ago, for this sort of purpose.
    However, that was in the days of three-fingered brake levers. In addition to this, their (lack of)
    success in the market place means that they're no longer available.

    --
    a.m-b FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/ambfaq.htm

    b.bmx FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/bmx_faq.htm
     
  3. Trentus wrote:
    >
    > The subject pretty much says it all.

    Why are you on bar ends while descending? <G>

    Bar ends are designed to help move weight forward, as on steep climbs. If your hands are that
    uncomfortable on the bars, perhaps you need a bike that fits?

    Barry
     
  4. Shaun Rimmer

    Shaun Rimmer Guest

    Trentus <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:RQq%[email protected]...
    > The subject pretty much says it all. I find holding the bar ends far more comfortable, and
    > much greater
    control.
    > I just can't control my SPEED while holding the bar ends, as I can't reach the brake levers. So
    > for decents etc. where I want best control but also need brakes, I have to sacrifice some control
    > by holding the handlebars direct instead
    so
    > I can reach the brakes.
    >
    > Any suggestions? The handlebar grips don't easily allow for me to move the levers closer (though I
    > haven't fully investigated this option, and that would also preclude ever being
    able
    > to hold the handlebars and limit me to ONLY the bar ends which isn't ideal.
    >
    > Ideal would be some alternate brake levers, or extensions to the existing levers, maybe operated
    > by just one or two fingers, that can be accessed from the bar
    ends.

    I must echo Barry and Bomba's comments here - riding downhill holding the bar ends isn't a good
    idea. Even if you manage to position your weight correctly, the change in leverage/angle of strain
    on muscle groups involved in control will likely reduce your ability to steer.

    Shaun aRe
     
  5. Pete Jones

    Pete Jones Guest

    On Mon, 3 Feb 2003 20:53:26 +1100, "Trentus" <[email protected]> blathered:

    >I find holding the bar ends far more comfortable, and much greater control. I just can't control my
    >SPEED while holding the bar ends, as I can't reach the brake levers. So for decents etc. where I
    >want best control but also need brakes, I have to sacrifice some control by holding the handlebars
    >direct instead so I can reach the brakes.
    >
    >Any suggestions?

    Dr Dew, where are you?

    Pete
    ----
    http://www.btinternet.com/~peteajones/
     
  6. Klydesdale

    Klydesdale Guest

    "Trentus" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:RQq%[email protected]...
    > The subject pretty much says it all. I find holding the bar ends far more comfortable, and
    > much greater
    control.
    > I just can't control my SPEED while holding the bar ends, as I can't reach the brake levers. So
    > for decents etc. where I want best control but also need brakes, I have to sacrifice some control
    > by holding the handlebars direct instead
    so
    > I can reach the brakes.
    >
    > Any suggestions? The handlebar grips don't easily allow for me to move the levers closer (though I
    > haven't fully investigated this option, and that would also preclude ever being
    able
    > to hold the handlebars and limit me to ONLY the bar ends which isn't ideal.
    >
    > Ideal would be some alternate brake levers, or extensions to the existing levers, maybe operated
    > by just one or two fingers, that can be accessed from the bar
    ends.
    >

    How about something like this:

    http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?category=&subcategory=&brand=&sku=8022&st oretype=&estoreid=
     
  7. "Trentus" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:RQq%[email protected]...
    | The subject pretty much says it all. I find holding the bar ends far more comfortable, and
    | much greater
    control.
    | I just can't control my SPEED while holding the bar ends, as I can't reach the brake levers. So
    | for decents etc. where I want best control but also need brakes, I have to sacrifice some control
    | by holding the handlebars direct instead
    so
    | I can reach the brakes.
    |
    | Any suggestions? The handlebar grips don't easily allow for me to move the levers closer (though I
    | haven't fully investigated this option, and that would also preclude ever being
    able
    | to hold the handlebars and limit me to ONLY the bar ends which isn't ideal.
    |
    | Ideal would be some alternate brake levers, or extensions to the existing levers, maybe operated
    | by just one or two fingers, that can be accessed from the bar
    ends.

    Poke around older, established bike shops. There used to be some extensions you could add to
    the tips of aluminum brake levers. You might run into a bit of trouble with the shorter levers
    these days.

    One company went so far as to make a lever with these extensions built in, but I don't think they
    caught on and they would not work with V-brakes or disks anyhow.

    ---
    __o _`\(,_ Cycling is life, (_)/ (_) all the rest, just details. Nelson Binch =^o.o^=
    http://intergalax.com

    Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.449 / Virus Database: 251 -
    Release Date: 1/27/2003
     
  8. Supabonbon

    Supabonbon Guest

    bomba <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Trentus wrote:
    > > The subject pretty much says it all. I find holding the bar ends far more comfortable, and much
    > > greater control. I just can't control my SPEED while holding the bar ends, as I can't reach the
    > > brake levers. So for decents etc. where I want best control but also need brakes, I have to
    > > sacrifice some control by holding the handlebars direct instead so I can reach the brakes.
    >
    > Hanging on to the bar ends whilst descending is not such a good idea. You're moving your body
    > position further forward, in a situation where your weight should be further back. Ideally, I
    > think you need to assess why you find it more comfortable to rest on the bar ends, and then adjust
    > your stem / bar accordingly. Is it because they're wider? Is it because they're higher?
    >
    > You used to be able to get extensions to the brake levers many years ago, for this sort of
    > purpose. However, that was in the days of three-fingered brake levers. In addition to this, their
    > (lack of) success in the market place means that they're no longer available.

    Right. Ever consider trying drop bars? I don't personally recommend it for offroad, but I've seen
    it done. /s
     
  9. "Ground Control©" wrote:
    >
    >
    > One company went so far as to make a lever with these extensions built in, but I don't think they
    > caught on and they would not work with V-brakes or disks anyhow.
    >

    They probably didn't catch on because going downhill with your weight forward is a bad idea. <G>

    Barry
     
  10. supabonbon wrote:
    >
    > Right. Ever consider trying drop bars? I don't personally recommend it for offroad, but I've seen
    > it done. /s

    It's even got a name! Cyclocross!

    Barry
     
  11. Simon

    Simon Guest

    "B a r r y B u r k e J r ." <"keep it in the newsgroup "@thankyou.com> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    | supabonbon wrote:
    | >
    | > Right. Ever consider trying drop bars? I don't personally recommend it for offroad, but I've
    | > seen it done. /s
    |
    | It's even got a name! Cyclocross!
    |
    | Barry

    LMAO damn you beat me to it

    Simon
     
  12. "B a r r y B u r k e J r ." wrote:

    > "Ground Control©" wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > > One company went so far as to make a lever with these extensions built in, but I don't think
    > > they caught on and they would not work with V-brakes or disks anyhow.
    > >
    >
    > They probably didn't catch on because going downhill with your weight forward is a bad idea. <G>
    >
    > Barry

    Sometimes you need brakes going up hill too. I was riding with a few guys that I'd never ridden with
    this past Saturday and while climbing some of them didn't seem to keep a very consistent pace.
    Several times while on the bar ends I had to reach for the brakes to avoid a collision. A couple of
    times I hit their rear tire with my front because I could not slow down quickly enough when I
    stopped pedaling.

    That said, I'm not looking for a solution to the problem.
     
  13. Trentus

    Trentus Guest

    > One company went so far as to make a lever with these extensions built in, but I don't think they
    > caught on and they would not work with V-brakes or disks anyhow.

    Why wouldn't they work with V or disks?

    And for further clarification, my bike shop insists I need to shorten my - what used to be called a
    gooseneck? - but I already feel like my handlebars are waaay to close to me, I want them further
    away, not closer. Thus I do almost ALL my riding on the barends, up hill, downhill, and flats. Hence
    the desire to move my brake levers to where they can be reached. My weight is WELL back, despite
    this, as I have my balls riding just mm above the tyre as it is. Hit the brakes and they'll either
    hit the seat - ouch, or they'll hit the tyre - ouch again.

    Yes I feel the bike doesn't fit, but it's the one the LBS fitted to me, they reckon it's the right
    fit, but it doesn't feel like it sometimes.

    Oh well, thems the breaks. Mind you, this LBS sometimes makes me wonder if they know what the hell
    they're doing, then other times they seem to be excellent. I've basically decided to limit all my
    dealings to the one staff member there who seems to be really well plugged in. And he even rides
    professionally for the people who make my bike - Merida. They must think highly of him, they gave
    him two bikes worth over $12,000 for free. And he certainly seems to know what he's talking about
    with all my dealings with him. It's just the other staff there that I have doubts about.

    Trentus
     
  14. Bomba

    Bomba Guest

    Trentus wrote:
    >>One company went so far as to make a lever with these extensions built in, but I don't think they
    >>caught on and they would not work with V-brakes or disks anyhow.
    >
    >
    > Why wouldn't they work with V or disks?

    Cable pull?

    >
    > And for further clarification, my bike shop insists I need to shorten my - what used to be called
    > a gooseneck?

    You mean a 'stem'. Why does your bike shop insist you shorten your stem? There are advantages (and
    disadvantages) to using a shorter stem, but I'd be interested to know their arguments in light of:

    - but I already feel like my handlebars
    > are waaay to close to me, I want them further away, not closer.

    Have you told the LBS this?

    > Thus I do almost ALL my riding on the barends, up hill, downhill, and flats. Hence the desire to
    > move my brake levers to where they can be reached. My weight is WELL back, despite this, as I have
    > my balls riding just mm above the tyre as it is. Hit the brakes and they'll either hit the seat -
    > ouch, or they'll hit the tyre - ouch again.

    Then it sounds like your bike is the wrong size. The cockpit appears to be too cramped. JOOI, what
    size are you, and what size is the bike?

    > Yes I feel the bike doesn't fit, but it's the one the LBS fitted to me, they reckon it's the right
    > fit, but it doesn't feel like it sometimes.

    Then there's a chance the LBS doesn't know what it's doing. Of course, perhaps you just prefer a
    laid out position...

    Possible solutions: Brake lever extensions aren't your answer - you need to extend the bar / saddle
    distance. Try a longer flatter stem. What size is your current stem? A 120mm with a 5 deg rise
    should be about the limit. Similarly, have a look for a layback seat post.

    Of course, these are temporary measures and really just a precursor to the real advice that you
    don't want to hear...

    <whisper> You probably need a bike that fits you </whisper>

    --
    a.m-b FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/ambfaq.htm

    b.bmx FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/bmx_faq.htm
     
  15. Supabonbon

    Supabonbon Guest

    "B a r r y B u r k e J r ." <"keep it in the newsgroup "@thankyou.com> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > supabonbon wrote:
    > >
    > > Right. Ever consider trying drop bars? I don't personally recommend it for offroad, but I've
    > > seen it done. /s
    >
    > It's even got a name! Cyclocross!
    >
    > Barry

    Yeah yeah yeah.... Saw that coming. Actually, I meant for regular xcountry riding, which is
    different from cyclocross. Tomac rode them in the downhill at Mt Snow a long time ago. /s
     
  16. supabonbon wrote in message <[email protected]>...
    >"B a r r y B u r k e J r ." <"keep it in the newsgroup "@thankyou.com>
    wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    >> supabonbon wrote:
    >> >
    >> > Right. Ever consider trying drop bars? I don't personally recommend it for offroad, but I've
    >> > seen it done. /s
    >>
    >> It's even got a name! Cyclocross!
    >>
    >> Barry
    >
    >Yeah yeah yeah.... Saw that coming. Actually, I meant for regular xcountry riding, which is
    >different from cyclocross. Tomac rode them in the downhill at Mt Snow a long time ago. /s

    He put them on his mtn bike because his coach told him he would do better if he had a consistent
    position across all his bikes. He himself admits that they sucked.

    Steve E.
     
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