Anybody else suffer from Plantar Fasciitis?

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Steve Christens, Sep 16, 2003.

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  1. This past year I have developed a type of heel pain known as plantar faciitis, also known as heel
    spur syndrome. The symptom is terrible pain in the heel when first getting out of bed in the
    morning, but the pain goes away as you warm up and stretch the leg. The pain is inflamation of the
    plantar fascia, a connective tissue that supports the arch of the foot. The cause is a bit vague,
    but can involve overuse and possibly a muscle mis-alignment, though not usually impact (as with
    running). There isn't really a cure, other than lots of stretching, which is quite literally a pain.

    The cycling connection is that in my case the pain is exacerbated by cycling. Which I sort of
    figured it had to be, since the only thing I do other than cycle 200 miles a week is sit at a
    computer all day. Like many of us I had mounted my cleats quite far back on the sole of the shoe to
    help combat numb feet. Well, I have come to appreciate that this may be the source of my problem.

    With the cleat mounted that far back, the spindle is pressing on the middle of the fascia,
    stretching it with every pedal stroke. I have just tried mounting the cleat further forward so that
    it matches the typical rodie position of being right over the ball of my foot. Its a bit early to
    say for sure, but I do think this this may reduce the pressure on the fascia, since it places the
    force on the end, not the middle, of the fascia. So far the irritation is quite a bit less, and numb
    foot has not yet reared it head.

    So I was just wondering whether any other bent riders had been through this problem. If you have,
    you might consider your cleat position as one of the factors.

    Steve Christensen Midland, MI
     
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  2. Mlb

    Mlb Guest

    Steve Christensen <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:

    > This past year I have developed a type of heel pain known as plantar faciitis, also known as
    > heel spur syndrome. The symptom is terrible pain in the heel when first getting out of bed in
    > the morning, but the pain goes away as you warm up and stretch the leg. The pain is inflamation
    > of the plantar fascia, a connective tissue that supports the arch of the foot. The cause is a
    > bit vague, but can involve overuse and possibly a muscle mis-alignment, though not usually
    > impact (as with running). There isn't really a cure, other than lots of stretching, which is
    > quite literally a pain.
    >
    > The cycling connection is that in my case the pain is exacerbated by cycling. Which I sort of
    > figured it had to be, since the only thing I do other than cycle 200 miles a week is sit at a
    > computer all day. Like many of us I had mounted my cleats quite far back on the sole of the shoe
    > to help combat numb feet. Well, I have come to appreciate that this may be the source of my
    > problem.
    >
    > With the cleat mounted that far back, the spindle is pressing on the middle of the fascia,
    > stretching it with every pedal stroke. I have just tried mounting the cleat further forward so
    > that it matches the typical rodie position of being right over the ball of my foot. Its a bit
    > early to say for sure, but I do think this this may reduce the pressure on the fascia, since it
    > places the force on the end, not the middle, of the fascia. So far the irritation is quite a bit
    > less, and numb foot has not yet reared it head.
    >
    > So I was just wondering whether any other bent riders had been through this problem. If you have,
    > you might consider your cleat position as one of the factors.
    >
    > Steve Christensen Midland, MI
    >
    >

    Had it when I first started riding. It's caused by the seat being too far back and over extending on
    the extension to the pedals. It actually is the precursor of bone spurs as the body will start to
    form bone over the inflamed tendons to protect them. It's NOT your cleat position. Move your seat
    closer and see if that gives you relief. I was also "ankling" which agrevated that problem. Hanging
    by your toes off a step (heel dropping down as far as possible) is a really good achilles stretch
    and usually gave me immediate (if temporary) relief when it was really hurting. Took a good year for
    mine to go away completely. Now 2 years later I can have my toes on one step and touch my heels to
    the step below that.
     
  3. Cletus Lee

    Cletus Lee Guest

    Plantar faciitis is the reason I gave up running and got into cycling. I developed the problem and
    kept running on paved surfaces. It was a year of steroid treatments before I could walk without
    pain. Steroidal injections by my podiatrist and orthodics helped but more than anything else, time
    without re-injury was the crucial factor.

    If you are sure that cycling is the cause, then cleat position is probably the culprit. If you can I
    would suggest a visit to a good sports podiatrist.

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > This past year I have developed a type of heel pain known as plantar faciitis, also known as
    > heel spur syndrome. The symptom is terrible pain in the heel when first getting out of bed in
    > the morning, but the pain goes away as you warm up and stretch the leg. The pain is inflamation
    > of the plantar fascia, a connective tissue that supports the arch of the foot. The cause is a
    > bit vague, but can involve overuse and possibly a muscle mis-alignment, though not usually
    > impact (as with running). There isn't really a cure, other than lots of stretching, which is
    > quite literally a pain.
    >
    > The cycling connection is that in my case the pain is exacerbated by cycling. Which I sort of
    > figured it had to be, since the only thing I do other than cycle 200 miles a week is sit at a
    > computer all day. Like many of us I had mounted my cleats quite far back on the sole of the shoe
    > to help combat numb feet. Well, I have come to appreciate that this may be the source of my
    > problem.
    >
    > With the cleat mounted that far back, the spindle is pressing on the middle of the fascia,
    > stretching it with every pedal stroke. I have just tried mounting the cleat further forward so
    > that it matches the typical rodie position of being right over the ball of my foot. Its a bit
    > early to say for sure, but I do think this this may reduce the pressure on the fascia, since it
    > places the force on the end, not the middle, of the fascia. So far the irritation is quite a bit
    > less, and numb foot has not yet reared it head.
    >
    > So I was just wondering whether any other bent riders had been through this problem. If you have,
    > you might consider your cleat position as one of the factors.
    >
    > Steve Christensen Midland, MI
    >
    >

    --

    Cletus D. Lee Bacchetta Giro Lightning Voyager http://www.clee.org
    - Bellaire, TX USA -
     
  4. Jim H

    Jim H Guest

    You'll get various opinions, but check to see if you're over-pronating while pedaling. If you are,
    good arch supports in your cycling shoes can stop it.
     
  5. > So I was just wondering whether any other bent riders had been through
    this
    > problem. If you have, you might consider your cleat position as one of
    the
    > factors.
    >
    > Steve Christensen Midland, MI
    >

    Yup, I was diagnosed with it many years ago. For me, the only solution was very expensive arch
    supports/orthotics- until I found that Birkenstock sandals and shoes have just the footbed that I
    need. When I began riding bents, I found that none of the bike shoes had a decent arch in them, plus
    I could never find any that were wide enough. My solution is Shimano sandals with Birkenstock
    footbeds. The sandal's straps allow me to fit them perfectly to my wide feet and the footbeds are
    kept in place with velcro patches. The birkenstock footbed not only has a high arch, but it has a
    raised area to support the plantar tendon. For cold weather riding, I just put on heavy socks and
    re-adjust the sandal straps.

    rich
     
  6. Bentbiker

    Bentbiker Guest

    do not know if this has been mentioned, but a tremdous help for it, was giving to me by a physical
    therapist: Take a water bottle and freeze it, stand up and roll it back and forth under the arch
    area applying weight as tolerated, this really helps stretch the tendon, and the ice helps with the
    inflamation at the same time. If you don't have it, this feels great even on just tired feet.

    Cletus Lee wrote:
    > Plantar faciitis is the reason I gave up running and got into cycling. I developed the problem and
    > kept running on paved surfaces. It was a year of steroid treatments before I could walk without
    > pain. Steroidal injections by my podiatrist and orthodics helped but more than anything else, time
    > without re-injury was the crucial factor.
    >
    > If you are sure that cycling is the cause, then cleat position is probably the culprit. If you can
    > I would suggest a visit to a good sports podiatrist.
    >
    >
    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    >>This past year I have developed a type of heel pain known as plantar faciitis, also known as
    >>heel spur syndrome. The symptom is terrible pain in the heel when first getting out of bed in
    >>the morning, but the pain goes away as you warm up and stretch the leg. The pain is inflamation
    >>of the plantar fascia, a connective tissue that supports the arch of the foot. The cause is a
    >>bit vague, but can involve overuse and possibly a muscle mis-alignment, though not usually
    >>impact (as with running). There isn't really a cure, other than lots of stretching, which is
    >>quite literally a pain.
    >>
    >>The cycling connection is that in my case the pain is exacerbated by cycling. Which I sort of
    >>figured it had to be, since the only thing I do other than cycle 200 miles a week is sit at a
    >>computer all day. Like many of us I had mounted my cleats quite far back on the sole of the shoe
    >>to help combat numb feet. Well, I have come to appreciate that this may be the source of my
    >>problem.
    >>
    >>With the cleat mounted that far back, the spindle is pressing on the middle of the fascia,
    >>stretching it with every pedal stroke. I have just tried mounting the cleat further forward so
    >>that it matches the typical rodie position of being right over the ball of my foot. Its a bit
    >>early to say for sure, but I do think this this may reduce the pressure on the fascia, since it
    >>places the force on the end, not the middle, of the fascia. So far the irritation is quite a bit
    >>less, and numb foot has not yet reared it head.
    >>
    >>So I was just wondering whether any other bent riders had been through this problem. If you have,
    >>you might consider your cleat position as one of the factors.
    >>
    >>Steve Christensen Midland, MI
    >>
    >>
     
  7. fblum

    fblum New Member

    Joined:
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    yeah- I get plantar fasciitis occasionally. What helped me the most was good arch support in all my shoes. Some shoes are naturally good- like Birkenstock (haven't seen any cycling shoes from them...yet) Also Chaco sport sandals have great arch support. And Specialized has a whole line of cycling shoes with good arches (didn't fit me quite right but some people love them)
    As for cleat placement (if I understand your concerns correctly) I think that lower cleat locations (i.e. towards the heel) puts much less mechanical stress on the fascia. It's not the direct pressure on the fascia that causes the problem (arches supply direct pressure and they help!) but the stretching of the fascia that occurs without arch support or when you have to push harder on your pedals b/o high cleat placement.
    In AM immediately put on a sandal with arch support and pain will go away.
     
  8. Skip

    Skip Guest

    "rich westerman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > >
    >
    > Yup, I was diagnosed with it many years ago. For me, the only solution
    was
    > very expensive arch supports/orthotics- until I found that Birkenstock sandals and shoes have just
    > the footbed that I need. When I began riding bents, I found that none of the bike shoes had a
    decent
    > arch in them, plus I could never find any that were wide enough. My solution is Shimano sandals
    > with Birkenstock footbeds. The sandal's straps allow me to fit them perfectly to my wide feet and
    > the footbeds are kept in place with velcro patches. The birkenstock footbed not only has a high
    > arch, but it has a raised area to support the plantar tendon. For cold weather riding, I just put
    > on heavy socks and re-adjust the
    sandal
    > straps.
    >

    Same experience.

    The Birkenstock footbeds attached to Shimano sandals with Velcro is a great idea. Which insert did
    you use? The longer leather covered one? Does it stay in place with the Velcro?

    My feet are Birkenstock addicts.

    skip
     
  9. > Same experience.
    >
    > The Birkenstock footbeds attached to Shimano sandals with Velcro is a
    great
    > idea. Which insert did you use? The longer leather covered one? Does it stay in place with
    > the Velcro?
    >
    > My feet are Birkenstock addicts.
    >
    > skip
    >
    >
    My footbeds have a blue upper with a composite/leather structure below. I got them at my lbs (local
    birkenstock store) They're kinda pricey, but then we're paying for the b-stock name, I guess. I've
    used these all summer and I've had NO foot pain and for some reason, they seem to have eliminated
    the numb toes that I used to get on longer rides.

    rich
     
  10. Freewheeling

    Freewheeling Guest

    Rich:

    I've had good luck with Superfeet insoles, and they have two that are specifically for bike shoes.
    They also make (or used to make) a quasi-customizable insole, that have to be fitted at the store
    (provided they have someone with the proper training). But I've never tried the custum version. They
    have two different types because there's one for MTB and one for road shoes.

    --
    --Scott [email protected] Cut the "tail" to send email.

    Blog: http://demosophia.typepad.com/demosophia "When the statues of Daedalus come to life no men
    will have masters, nor masters slaves." -- Aristotle

    "rich westerman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > > Same experience.
    > >
    > > The Birkenstock footbeds attached to Shimano sandals with Velcro is a
    > great
    > > idea. Which insert did you use? The longer leather covered one? Does
    it
    > > stay in place with the Velcro?
    > >
    > > My feet are Birkenstock addicts.
    > >
    > > skip
    > >
    > >
    > My footbeds have a blue upper with a composite/leather structure below. I got them at my lbs
    > (local birkenstock store) They're kinda pricey, but
    then
    > we're paying for the b-stock name, I guess. I've used these all summer
    and
    > I've had NO foot pain and for some reason, they seem to have eliminated
    the
    > numb toes that I used to get on longer rides.
    >
    > rich
     
  11. Ask the podiatrist about "endoscopic plantar fasciotomy". If s/he doesn't do this (yet) ask to be
    referred to a DPM who does, for a second opinion and an option that MIGHT work for you.

    Each case must be evaluated on its own merits, but this newer minimally-invasive approach shows some
    promise as to better results, and results in a shorter rehabilitation with less disability.

    Worth asking about, IMO.
     
  12. Bob Fleer

    Bob Fleer Guest

    "Freewheeling" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Rich:
    >
    > I've had good luck with Superfeet insoles, and they have two that are specifically for bike shoes.
    > They also make (or used to make) a quasi-customizable insole, that have to be fitted at the store
    > (provided they have someone with the proper training). But I've never tried the custum version.
    > They have two different types because there's one for MTB and one for road shoes.
    >
    > --
    > --Scott [email protected] Cut the "tail" to send email.
    >
    > Blog: http://demosophia.typepad.com/demosophia "When the statues of Daedalus come to life no men
    > will have masters, nor masters slaves." -- Aristotle

    I have not ridden my Vision r-44 for 7 months. I overtrained and put alot of ptime building legs and
    riding indoors this pst winter and fall. I din't stretch enough and now I am paying the piper. I
    have totake naperson anti-imflamitori medication now for 4 monts and had a cortisone shot in my left
    ankle. Doctor has me on arch supports and now I have to stretch out the calves 3sets of ten 3x/ day.
    He suggested heat on the inflamed areas with a heating pad 2 x /day for 45 min each time. Bob Fleer
    Vision R-44
    >
    >
    > "rich westerman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > > Same experience.
    > > >
    > > > The Birkenstock footbeds attached to Shimano sandals with Velcro is a
    > great
    > > > idea. Which insert did you use? The longer leather covered one? Does
    > it
    > > > stay in place with the Velcro?
    > > >
    > > > My feet are Birkenstock addicts.
    > > >
    > > > skip
    > > >
    > > >
    > > My footbeds have a blue upper with a composite/leather structure below. I got them at my lbs
    > > (local birkenstock store) They're kinda pricey, but
    > then
    > > we're paying for the b-stock name, I guess. I've used these all summer
    > and
    > > I've had NO foot pain and for some reason, they seem to have eliminated
    > the
    > > numb toes that I used to get on longer rides.
    > >
    > > rich
    > >
     
  13. David Bogie

    David Bogie Guest

    PF can be a seriously debilitating medical condition. Like some of the weird things that hapen with
    our knees, self-diagnosis and self-treatment might not be in your best interest. Look it up in
    Google or the medical sites.

    My PF was a direct cause of wearing New Balance shoes. My physical therapist tells me that something
    fundamental changed in NB footbeds about two years ago and that he sees many PF sufferers that he
    feels can be traced directly to NB shoes. Change the shoes to begin the healing. Bummed me out
    because I have worn Newbies for fifteen-twenty years.

    I now wear Brooks. New shoes along with strict compliance to some simple exercises and stretches and
    my PF is finally going away.

    We found no way to link my bike, my bike shoes, or pedals to the condition.

    david boise ID
     
  14. wierd uncle AL

    wierd uncle AL New Member

    Joined:
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    For two years I had pain so bad I could hardly walk. Tried steroid shots (big needle in the bottom of foot down to the bone!) w/o lasting help. "Good Feet" arch supports ended the problem 98%.
    I put them in whatever shoes I wear. My 2 cents.
     
  15. Dave Clary

    Dave Clary Guest

    On 18 Sep 2003 20:53:23 -0700, [email protected] (David Bogie) wrote:

    >My PF was a direct cause of wearing New Balance shoes. My physical therapist tells me that
    >something fundamental changed in NB footbeds about two years ago and that he sees many PF sufferers
    >that he feels can be traced directly to NB shoes.

    I find this rather hard to believe. How did the PT make this determination?

    Dave Clary/Corpus Christi, Tx Home: http://home.stx.rr.com/dclary RSG Roll Call
    http://www.rec-sport-golf.com/members/?rollcall=claryd
     
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