Anybody register for the Triple Bypass?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by CyclinYooper, Jan 6, 2012.

  1. CyclinYooper

    CyclinYooper New Member

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    One of my cycling buddies convinced me to register for this year: http://www.teamevergreen.org/triple.

    He's riding the "double" ... I only put in for one of the single days. Results are posted 1.9.12.

    Just curious to see if anyone else is trying?

    Scott
     
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  2. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    FWIW. There are a couple of things which may be of benefit in your preparation:

    • consider taking at least one, long ride (with your buddy) out to Madrid, then back to Frost Road, then up to the Crest (~11,000 feet) or just to the ski area (if you are having a 'bad' day), then east to Mountain Valley Road & then south along the "Rollers" and up to Oak Flats (~9,000 feet) before heading back down South 14 to Route 66 ...
    • and, presuming that you have not done so already, give serious consideration to getting a set of Campagnolo shifters for your bike!

    Have fun!
     
  3. swampy1970

    swampy1970 Well-Known Member

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    Alf,

    I don't think that too many people these days live in fear of their Shimano brifters exploding so I'm not sure why the constant suggestions to change what is one of the most expensive things on the bike... I think it makes more sense to wait until the day that "apocalypse" hits and you end up jammed in the little sprocket or stuck in whatever gear you were in at the time.


    Scott,

    That looks interesting but alas it's a bit far from NorCal, so I'll stick with the usual Alta Alpina Challenge and Death Ride... Maybe the Devil Mountain double too this year.

    The scenery up on the Triple ByPass looks awesome.
     
  4. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    It isn't the reliability of the Shimano shifters which I question ...

    • And, I know that I am not the only person who has lamented the effects of the "dwell" which rears its ugly head at the least opportune times as the rider waits that extra second-or-two for the chain to engage after a shift is initiated ...

    It is just that 'I' find that when Campagnolo shifters are mated to Shimano derailleurs & cassettes that the resultant shifting is superior to the shifting on an all-Shimano bike ... I find that it is shifting which is matched in description by those who have gushed about the shifting the reviewers experienced with a Di2 drivetrain.

    So, I suppose that I recommend the Campagnolo-Shimano marriage so often because 'I' was shocked at how poorly the all-Shimano drivetrain functioned BUT therefore surprised by how well the unauthorized combination worked.

    Of course, I know that 'I' benefit from the superior combination as I slog up the mountain roadways and am able to downshift without the chain skating momentarily on the adjacent cog due to the engineered dwell.

    I can't say it often enough -- Shimano components are great.

    And, the dwell which I rue has been a blessing-in-disguise for all cyclist because were it not for the apparent hubris of the engineering team which persists in maintaining the eccentric take up spool then Shimano would not have engineered the ramping and pinning which also makes the Campagnolo shifter function even more smoothly.

    • as you may-or-may-not recall my stating before, after I realized the superiority of the Campagnolo shifter to handle downshifting when under a fairly heavy load, I tested the shifting on the front derailleur by using an older, thin-and-flat 7-speed chainring AND the shifting was effortless when compared to a 6500 shifter + a ramped-and-pinned chainring.
    • BTW. I also mentioned that I reckon that a Rapid Rise rear deralleur may resolve downshifting when the drivetrain is under a load (but, I have yet to implement a road test -- maybe I'll finally do it this year) BUT the comparatively imprecise front shifting would persist.

    So, I figure anyone who isn't a Flatlander who may have experienced a misshift-or-two with their all-Shimano drivetrain shouldn't blame him-or-herself for less than stellar technique ...

    AND, s/he would probably benefit from the Campagnolo-Shimano combination, too.

    Maybe, maybe not!?!

    As far as price, a pair of Campagnolo shifters currently goes for between $100 & $200 on eBay ... a person can pay more, of course ... if the Shimano shifters are subsequently sold then the net cost is less.

    Sponsored riders & people with deep pockets can luxuriate in whichever high-zoot group they want to use, but unless they are using a Di2 or soon be using the forthcoming Campagnolo EPS drivetrain then I think that they will be hard press to achieve better shifting than with the unauthorized combination!

    Yes, yes. I know the legacy of the leisure-suit mentality persists with many who feel that all of their cycling components must have matching names silk-screened onto each component ... of course, THAT may be more true for the so-called Campy Only aficionado than other cyclists ... after all, heaven forbid any Campy equipped bike has to endure some non-Campagnolo components!

    Maybe after Shimano feels that the novelty of their Di2 shifters has been exhausted then they will finally eliminate the "dwell" which has restricted the precision which their mechanical shifters are capable of eventually achieving ...

    That's my story, and I'm sticking to it!
     
  5. CyclinYooper

    CyclinYooper New Member

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    Thanks guys,

    alf: I've forgotten how well you know the Albuquerque east mountain area! No doubt the Sandia Crest ride will be a pivotal part of my training. Actually, if I could do the crest twice in one day ... I think I'd know I'm ready! Also, regarding the bike: I'm actually riding an upgrade now. Purchased a Cervelo RS in November with stock SRAM Rival components. No, it's no Campy. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif But, it shifts significantly faster than my Shimano Sora components on the previous bike (especially shifting a a larger rear cog on fun uphills).

    swampy: have fun on your California rides! The Death Ride looks aptly named; a killer for sure. I'm curious, what kind of crank/cassette combo do you use for a ride like that?

    Scott
     
  6. coloradcycle

    coloradcycle New Member

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    Hey Scott, I signed up for the sunday ride heading Eastbound. I only registered yesterday and got confirmation today. They have not sent out confirmation emails yet, however I was able to find my status by following a link in my registration email. What day did you sign up for? I live in Lyons if anybody wants to meetup for some hill climb training up to Estes Park!

    Best,

    Jeff
     
  7. CyclinYooper

    CyclinYooper New Member

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    Hello, Jeff, and welcom to the forum!

    I just checked my registration status: I drew Saturday! My riding buddy will be doing both days. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/eek.gif

    Saturday works a little better for my work schedule, but I planned on riding either way...

    Scott
     
  8. swampy1970

    swampy1970 Well-Known Member

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    Shocked how poorly the Shimano combination shifted? A second or two dwell?

    I own two Dura Ace equiped bikes (7800 and 7900) and have run oddball hybrid versions of Shimano drivetrains that include 9 speed XTR rear mechs and 11-32 IRD cassettes and all have shifted flawlessly - no dwell, no waiting... No issues with out of the saddle hard efforts and changing up or down. I suggest you install your Shimano equipment as per the documentation. Sure, the 7900 cable routing from the lever under the bars may take a little bit of tweeking to achieve the same quality of shift as the 7800 but when done right it's flawless and lightening fast.

    I found on a short test ride that the main benefit of Di2 was shifting from multiple locations.

    I'm guessing that I'm not the only rider to fail to see your issues with "dwell".
     
  9. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    Surely that can't be right! Why the paucity of claims about dwell and waits and other things absolutely proves that it's a problem! The "second or two" period is absolute BS.
     
  10. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    Alas. We have discussed this before AND you undoubtedly knew what I was going to say BUT it was necessary (IMO) to address the issue, again, for those who were not familiar with what you may feel is my singular experience ...

    But, you know that it is not a singular experience OR are pretending to have forgotten the numerous references in other threads in this very Forum AND it was even addressed at least one time on VeloNews.com (no, I don't recall precisely when, but you can certainly wend your way through their Tech section to find it if you are motivated) ...

    Of course, you have the advantage of using more recent vintages of Shimano's STI shifters whereas I was referring to my experience (and, that of at least two other people whom I know) with 6500 vintage shifters + one person who has 7700 shifters who admitted a failure-to-shift efficiently on at least one occasion...

    • NB. when I have queried about the difference in the shifting of the 9-speed Shimano shifters & 10-speed, the prior comments were that it was the same; so, I have to presume that the "dwell" is still in-built. Perhaps, not.
    • Perhaps there is less "dwell" with DA shifters than with lesser Shimano shifters.

    Perhaps I am dense, but you will never convince me that the current design of Shimano's shifters are as good as they can be ...

    But, OT, you will also never convince me of the superiority of double-butted spokes for the rider BUT 'I' will acknowledge that they are better for the wheelbuilder because (I will acknowledge that) the resultant wheel might seem better because its comparatively flexy build will present itself as staying truer with less maintainence ... so, what do I know?!?

    Well, your observation certainly seems different from that of the "professional" reviewers + the first adopters ...

    OR, are the former group simply shills for the various manufacturer's who advertise in their respective magazines and/or web sites?

    And, the latter group doesn't want to admit that they were snookered by the bling factor?

    Say it isn't so!

    BTW. It's not clear to ME, but isn't the Rabobank-Giant Off Road team using Di2 shifters (or, are they using SRAM?) & didn't Compton drop her chain during an important competition during this past season?

    Nice, huh?!?

    While I am sure it is possible to drop a chain when using a Campagnolo shifter + Shimano front derailleur, it would be exceedingly difficult to drop a front chain & would probably only occur if the derailleur's stops where not set properly.

    Tangentially related, Andy Schleck must still rue having his SRAM rear derailleur phug-up ...


    Quote:
    I'm guessing that I'm not the only rider to fail to see your issues with "dwell".


    Count yourself as being amongst the fortunate who have not had an occasional balky shift when using his/her Shimano shifters ...

    • OR, perhaps you simply have superior technique which 'I' feel should not be necessary BECAUSE it clearly does not occur with Campagnolo shifters & supposedly does not occur with SRAM shifters (of course, SRAM drivetrains have other issues which are hopefully resolved with the forthcoming iteration & which will hopefully trickle down to the lesser lines sooner-rather-than-later).
    • of course, the least expensive Campagnolo shifter is as mechanically efficient as the most expensive Campagnolo shifter ... are you suggesting that Shimano slugs their non-DA shifters to varying degrees?

    Again, if you are motivated, you can ferret out the periodic comments which relate to the situation of balky shifting caused by "dwell" where the offered solution is to accelerate momentarily to unload the drivetrain, etc.

    The suggestion to accelerated momentarily before downshifting when the drivetrain is under a load is not a solution to a non-existent problem.

    "Dwell" has been a problem with some Shimano drivetrains in the past, and undoubtedly may remain as a problem in the future.

    "Dwell" isn't a problem for ME because I made the decision not to use Shimano shifters.

    BTW. For ONE RIDE, why don't you mount an older, un-ramped & un-pinnned outer chainring on one of your bikes (I'm sure you must still have one) and see how well your more recent vintages of DA shifters handle moving the chain from the inner to outer chainring in varying situations & report back ...

    • to repeat myself (with different phrasing), the Shimano 6500 shifter did not engage a ramped-and-pinned outer chainring as well as a Campagnolo shifter works with an un-ramped & un-pinned chainring
    • maybe, the DA shifters are better
     
  11. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    Geez. Too bad I don't have a YouTube video to post for you to view ... Of course, to satisfy your renewed sense as policeman for the use of the English language, it would probably have been safer for me if I had written "A MOMENT OR TWO" ... But, while the dwell on rear shift may only take tenths of a second longer (or, is it merely hundredths of a second?), the time lost equates to lost momentum ... Regardless, after thinking about it, I will stand by my prior casual phrasing & suggest that it can indeed take "one or two seconds" for the chain to engage the outer chainring ...
    • now, I suppose the seemingly extended period of time could simply be due to a slow cadence by the rider
    But, as I have repeatedly stated, the mechanical Campagnolo shifter + Shimano front derailleur shifts very efficiently ... Plus, I will also repeat that it is exceedingly difficult to drop the chain when using a Campagnolo shifter + Shimano front derailleur if the stops are properly adjusted. You and swampy1970 can feign ignorance of the phenomena ... you can, if you choose, use a different label than "dwell" ... but, that doesn't mean that it doesn't occur with Shimano's STI drivetrains. BTW. Nice to see the real alienator is trying to break away from your self-imposed, wanna-be-nice facade & that you have been progressively trying to devolve back to making vapid & snarky comments since the New Year. WELCOME BACK!
     
  12. swampy1970

    swampy1970 Well-Known Member

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    That Andy Schleck ran pulley wheels in his rear mech that were a similar size to the small cog on the cassette (ie non-standard, funky aftermarket and way oversized) may have had something to do with his faux-pas that could have cost him the Tour. That Andy had a problem on his TT bike with shifting the following year in the Tour of Luxembourg I believe, on a Dura Ace Di2 equipped bike (as did Cancellara in the same time trial) may speak more to his mechanic making a few errors on setup. Not quite sure how you jam a chain on a smooth road with a Di2 but Andy managed it.

    When I bought my last bike, I test rode a whole bunch of bikes - probably about a dozen and nearly all Dura Ace equiped and none, yes NONE of them showed any sign of dwell or symptoms of slow shifting.

    I don't do anything weird or wonderful to my bikes in order to get the Dura Ace drivetrain to work how you would expect it too work - the cables are replaced once a year, the outer casings are cut properly and deburred, the cables are routed properly and all the bits that are supposed to be lubricated as per the service sheet are and the bits that are supposed to be clean are cleaned. Even with the bottom bracket cable guides semi junked up with Hammer Perpetuem, rock salt and dirt I've never had the shifting so bad that there's been any noticable delay.

    I can't see that the mechanism inside the lever could cause the shifting to occour really slowly unless someone had stuffed it with very heavy duty grease (ie a grease that should never be used on a bicycle) or the "wrong cables" were used or somehow managed to wrap the bartape so tight that it crushed the outer cable...

    I could use your tactics Alf and say "shock horror, Tom Boonen once dropped his chain on a Campag Record equiped [email protected][email protected][email protected][email protected]!" but I'll just use it as a way at laughing at you... not with you. ;) "Mechanicals" happen but since the Pros ride way more and their mechanics sometimes are not able to spend as much time on a given bike as they'd like, sometimes they mess up too...
     
  13. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    OY!?! Okay, let's distill MY observations ...
    • the same solution has been proferred more than one time in more than one venue to provide more efficient shifting when Shimano drivetrains are under load by accelerating momentarily, backing off, and then downshifting (if shifting on the rear)
    • I don't ever recall the particular suggestion of momentarily accelerating being accompanied by a suggestion to buy a set of DA shifters to eliminate the problem of balky shifting
    • hence, regardless of the label, I think that it would be difficult for an objective person to deny that there might actually be a problem which may indeed exist (¿real? or !?!phantom!?!) ...
    • BTW. if you want to blame-the-mechanic (and, I am certainly not responsible for the balky shifting which I have witnessed or read about on other people's bikes), then let me say that 'I' can effortlessly set up an unauthorized Campagnolo-Shimano drivetrain so that 'I' don't have to worry about inefficient shifting regardless of the level of Campagnolo shifter used (from Record down to Mirage) where 'I' don't have to worry about recalcitrant shifting ... and, I suspect, so can you!
    AND, regarding YOUR observation of never having experienced a problem with several (10 speed) Shimano Dura Ace shifters ...
    • perhaps it is the difference between 10-speed Dura Ace shifters and earlier iterations of Shimano STI shifters

    • I have little doubt that you have so many thousands of miles of uphill riding that you unconsciously unload your drivetrain when downshifting ...
    • heck, many of us have cycling "skills" which we do unconsciously -- what I could only described as a remnant of my youth manifested itself when I inadvertantly found myself in a track stand for about 20 +/- seconds while I waited for a car to slowly back out of its driveway, stop, and then drive forward to pass me (if I had anticipated a wait of more than a few seconds then I would have waited with one foot on the ground ... heck, I'm not sure that I can consciously do a track stand any longer) ... this happened only a few months ago ... but, if you were to tell me to ride to the same point on the roadway (the roadway had a slight downward slope), stop, and execute the same track stand I suspect that I would not be able to consciously do it for the same length of time.
    I've said it before & I'll say it again -- I love Shimano components, but not their shifters. While you may be satisfied with your experience with DA shifters, I reckon that they are not capable of smoothly shifting the chain between the inner chainring and an unramped-and-unpinned outer chainring. Stupid test? Perhaps, but (IMO) it translates as Campagnolo shifters having more efficient shifting because the ramping-and-pinning are not required for clean shifts ... Ramping-and-pinning inevitably make a Campagnolo shifter more efficient when moving the chain between the inner and outer chainrings, but they are certainly not necessary for efficient shifting. For a couple of years I had an 8-speed, 12-30 unramped XTR cassette + an XTR 950 rear derailleur mated to a 10-speed Campagnolo shifter (this is after I independently deduced that the combination worked but before I learned about hubbubing the rear derailleur cable anchoring for 9-speed Shimano indexing). Very clean shifts despite the lack of ramping on the cogs.

    BTW, Of course, ramping on the rear cogs is very beneficial if the indexing is slightly off (i.e., drifts) ...

    I even mismatched a 9-speed Campagnolo shifter with a 9-speed Shimano 11-32 XT cassette with the only downside being a loss of access of one of the intermediate cogs due to the lack of proper indexing ...

    • however, the properly indexed-for-the-cassette Shimano shifter certainly wasn't as forgiving!

    Was my experience the fault of an Ultegra shifter instead of a DA shifter?

    Perhaps.

    Another stupid example?

    Perhaps.

    Perhaps not.

    But, if you can't match the anecdotal examples with your DA shifters (which I am absolutely certain you can replicate with a set of Campagnolo shifters & an otherwise Shimano drivetrain with unramped-and/or-unpinned chainring + unramped cogs or mis-indexed cassette) and exquisitely-or-not tuned derailleurs then I will continued to attribute the greater efficiency of the Campagnolo shifters to a lack of the "dwell" that I have persistently lamented exists in Shimano's STI shifters.

    Laugh all you want ... EITHER at me AND/OR with Shimano's marketing & engineering teams who are undoubtedly laughing quietly at all the true believers with whom I will be laughing ...
     
  14. swampy1970

    swampy1970 Well-Known Member

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    When you're looking at a powermeter and it's telling you to give it more welly up the hill, you don't unload the transmission, you just hit the little lever to shift into a bigger gear... and that's what I love about the kit. It just works. I don't think that I've had to tweak the cable adjuster as I think Shimano must do a darned good job of pre-stretching their cables.

    Front shifting on the Dura Ace is stellar - probably as good, if not better than any groupset out there and it's not just me that thinks that.

    http://www.cyclingnews.com/features/on-the-road-finally-with-dura-ace-7900

    As for the quality of the rear shifts, all that cycling news had to say when talking about the chain was:


    How much smoother could it be? I'm guessing he'd also ridden more than a few other groupsets from Campag and SRAM...

    Even with Ultegra 6700 things are stellar.

    http://www.cyclingnews.com/reviews/shimano-ultegra-6700-group


    I could have spent a bunch of time trawling the net for similar articles but why bother. All that would happen would be a post with a few dozen links saying that shifting was beyond compare and I'd end up pissing up the iWall higher than you.

    Full power front chainring changing... who'da thunk it. Not sure why you'd want to go on about front shifting with chainrings that have no ramps though. I have no desire to go out an buy any of those. Why head back towards pre-90's technology when the newer stuff works better and seems to last just as long.

    To be honest the only Campagnolo equiped test bike that I rode was great and also shifted flawlessly - then again flawless doesn't beat flawless despite what the extra few grand on the price sticker might tell you.

    Stick that in your non-reach adjustable un-ergo ergo levers and smoke it ;)

    Now - why did you feel the need to mention someone change to Campag shifters in a post about the Triple Bypass when no prior mentions of shifting woes were made? Maybe you could tell TZ in his "ebay foilbles..." thread that his expensive wrist watches with piss poor time keeping might be more accurate with the addition of a Super Record brifter.
     
  15. An old Guy

    An old Guy Member

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    I have a much lower standard for shifting than most people do. If the bike does not fall apart and I don't fall off the shifting is good enough.

    I don't think many people (outside of a few pros caught on camera) have had a problem with shifting that caused them to lose a race that they could have won.

    ---

    I was in the wrong gear at the base of a hill a couple years ago. Tried to shift in front. The shift failed and I bailed. Not because the equipment was not up to it, but because I could not apply enough torque.
     
  16. swampy1970

    swampy1970 Well-Known Member

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    For the Death Ride I could easily use a 50/34 and a 11-28 cassette. It's not as hard as the name suggests - the majority of climbing is done in the first 3/4 and the last pass doesn't have that much in the way of steep grades. The hardest extended section of climbing is done in the first 13 miles - and the first 5 miles are downhill!

    For the Alta Alpina Challenge, which uses the same roads as the Death Ride for the last ~110 miles (in reverse so all the hard climbing is done at the end) I'll use 50/34 and an 11-32. That cassette has a last 3 sprockets of 25,28 and 32 which gives two handy gears for climbing and a bailout gear. That event has ~6,000ft more climbing and is about 75 miles longer.
     
  17. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    Apparently, what we have here is a failure to communicate ...

    This discussion is starting to make my hair hurt!


    Perhaps you have forgotten, but it was YOU who brought up the specific matter of Shimano shifters ... I gather that YOU, also, presumed that CyclinYooper was still riding a ¿SORA? equipped bike when you felt it was necessary to challenge my suggestion ...

    • I would hate to assault multiple climbs with SORA shifters ...
    • how about you?

    Yet, by your own declaration, both of your current bikes have 10-speed Dura Ace drivetrains ... what, a SORA drivetrain not good enough for your bikes?

    Now, before I get too deep into the weeds, let me say that I think:

    • it's great when someone can afford either Shimano Dura Ace or Ultegra drivetrains and/or various components
    • thank heavens you aren't using SRAM on your bikes!

    Now, YOU must know the difference in the price of a Dura Ace group (~$2000 +/- via mail order, certainly more if you get the components through an LBS, possibly less if you are a wise & patient shopper on eBay) & an Ultegra group (~$1200 +/-) and a pair of 10-speed Campagnolo shifters (less than $200 on eBay for either 10-speed or 11-speed Campagnolo shifters ... you can pay MORE, of course).

    Considering that the average rider is neither sponsored nor has deep pockets, it would seem to make the most sense for most of us to spend our cycling dollars wisely ...

    • sorry, CyclinYooper, for your new bike's component choice ...
    • it's a great frame, however ...
    • regardless, all is not lost, and you can directly swap your SRAM shifters for a set of Campagnolo 10-speed shifters -- you can temporarily put those SRAM shifters on your older, 8-speed bike & sell the ¿SORA? shfiters before you realize that Campagnolo shifters will be better for both! The same 10-speed Campagnolo shifters will create 8-speed Shimano indexing & 10-speed SRAM indexing with their respective rear derailleurs, so (alternatively) you could upgrade the SORA-equipped bike, first, and then upgrade the SRAM bike after you realize how much better the Campagnolo shifters are than the SRAM shifters.

    FYI. Flawless shifting can be achieved with the fore mentioned unauthorized Campagnolo-Shimano marriage ... no need to spend thousands.

    • Some of the credit for the success of the unauthorized marriage has to go to the superior ramping on Shimano cassettes vs. what was once minimal ramping on Campagnolo cassettes -- here's a typical Campagnolo cassette which I restacked with a 29t MICHE cog:

    [​IMG]

    • The unauthorized marriage does not require a special chain or an extraordinarily expensive outer chainring (more so, of course, for the 7900 outer chainring) to ensure optimal shifting ...
    ---​
    • Using the unramped chainring was originally a test ... at first it was a surprsingly successful test, but it shouldn't have been considering how unadorned Campagnolo's earlier 10-speed chainrings were.
    • The botttom line is that since I have the older chainrings, I might as well use them since there is no significant disadvantage.
    BTW. As you may recall, the unauthorized marriage has allowed me to use wussier 11-32 & 12-34 cassettes.

    Lucky for me, since I apparently have "NORMAL" sized hands, I've been good-to-go with all Campagnolo's shifters ...

    • of course, I still have to wrap-my-mind around the more current style of Campagnolo shifter before I actually wrap-my-hands around a set!
    Again, IMO, a rider only has to spend an additional $200-or-less to achieve what 'I' say is the same quality shifting which you feel your Dura Ace drivetrain has ...

    The round-about-point remains that, as far as I am concerned, you-or-anyone-else can achieve comparable shifting as that which you claim to get with your 7800-and-7900 Dura Ace drivetrains & that which the gushing shills [if YOU didn't-and-don't perceive a difference in mechanical DA drivetrain vs. the Di2 variant, then why the gushing by the paid reviewers unless they were-and/or-are shilling?!?] say they get with the Di2 by spending only $200 instead of $1200-to-$2000.

    • Why pay more if bling isn't the raison d'etre for choosing the components on your bike?
     
  18. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    Geez ...

    For the typical rider, it isn't about losing a race, or not ... it is, IMO, a matter of not experiencing an unnecessary, failed shift ...

    • What kind of shifters does your bike have?
    • How can you say that you could not apply "enough torque" when you were trying to shift?

    BTW. The only time I've failed to complete a downshift to a larger cog when using Campagnolo shifters is when the chain was already on the largest cog which the cassette had.
     
  19. An old Guy

    An old Guy Member

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    The shifters would not have mattered. I physically could not turn the crank in the gear I was in. I was paying attention to something other than riding and found myself doing a track stand in a 53/13(?) on a 10% hill.
     
  20. swampy1970

    swampy1970 Well-Known Member

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    Wow... quite the diatribe.

    But all that needs to be said is that you're making stuff up and your hair hurts because you can't keep up with lie.

    Without even knowing what the OP has on his bike and in the second post in this thread you said that they should consider changing to Campagnolo shifters. For all we know the OP has a Campag equipped bike. The OP didn't even mention equipment at that point.
     
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