anyone ever build their own bicycle storage stand?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Me, Sep 30, 2003.

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  1. Me

    Me Guest

    Hi I'm thinking about making my own stand that will allow me to hang my two bikes in my living room.

    I use to have a $200+ oak wooden one that stretched from floor to ceiling and had two arms to hold
    bikes, but I sold it a couple years ago when I moved out my apartment. Now I'm looking for something
    similar but can't affoard to buy taht one or the equivalent Al models ($100+)

    Anyone ever make one of these themselves? They don;t look to hard, but I was hoping to find a site
    that could suggest some plans and a list of materials...

    -thanks in advance...
     
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  2. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Tue, 30 Sep 2003 21:29:38 +0100, "Me" <[email protected]> may have said:

    >Anyone ever make one of these themselves? They don;t look to hard, but I was hoping to find a site
    >that could suggest some plans and a list of materials...

    Four of the shelf brackets with clothes rod hooks, of the tpye used in closets, and about 5 or 6
    8-ft sticks of 2x4 should be adequate for materials; a miter saw would be nice but not essential.
    The design should be fairly trivial, with many possible good ways to execute it.

    --
    My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail. Yes, I have a killfile. If I
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  3. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Tue, 30 Sep 2003 22:42:17 GMT, Werehatrack <[email protected]> may have said:

    >On Tue, 30 Sep 2003 21:29:38 +0100, "Me" <[email protected]> may have said:
    >
    >>Anyone ever make one of these themselves? They don;t look to hard, but I was hoping to find a site
    >>that could suggest some plans and a list of materials...
    >
    >Four of the shelf brackets with clothes rod hooks, of the tpye used in closets, and about 5 or 6
    >8-ft sticks of 2x4 should be adequate for materials; a miter saw would be nice but not essential.
    >The design should be fairly trivial, with many possible good ways to execute it.

    (something along this line was seen in a residence hall at Rice U. Most of the materials appeared
    to have been scrounged. Other people have coat racks next to their front door, this one had a
    bike rack.)

    --
    My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail. Yes, I have a killfile. If I
    don't respond to something, it's also possible that I'm busy.
     
  4. Raptor

    Raptor Guest

    Werehatrack wrote:
    > On Tue, 30 Sep 2003 21:29:38 +0100, "Me" <[email protected]> may have said:
    >
    >
    >>Anyone ever make one of these themselves? They don;t look to hard, but I was hoping to find a site
    >>that could suggest some plans and a list of materials...
    >
    >
    > Four of the shelf brackets with clothes rod hooks, of the tpye used in closets, and about 5 or 6
    > 8-ft sticks of 2x4 should be adequate for materials; a miter saw would be nice but not essential.
    > The design should be fairly trivial, with many possible good ways to execute it.

    I've actually gone to the effort of making my living room "nice", so I made some out of ash and
    strong curtain hooks I found at Home Depot. Ash is hardwood, and hard to work. I had it cut to match
    the curved headboard/footboard of my bed, then finished it myself, trying to match the staining. I
    used handlebar tape to cushion the bare metal hooks. 2" wood screws anchors one pair per bike to
    studs. Works like a charm, and looks decent.

    I'm pretty sure I'm straight, BTW.

    --
    --
    Lynn Wallace http://www.xmission.com/~lawall "I'm not proud. We really haven't done everything we
    could to protect our customers. Our products just aren't engineered for security." --Microsoft VP in
    charge of Windows OS Development, Brian Valentine.
     
  5. Lee

    Lee Guest

    "Raptor" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Werehatrack wrote:
    > > On Tue, 30 Sep 2003 21:29:38 +0100, "Me" <[email protected]> may have said:
    > >
    > >
    > >>Anyone ever make one of these themselves? They don;t look to hard, but I
    was
    > >>hoping to find a site that could suggest some plans and a list of materials...
    > >
    > >
    > > Four of the shelf brackets with clothes rod hooks, of the tpye used in closets, and about 5 or 6
    > > 8-ft sticks of 2x4 should be adequate for materials; a miter saw would be nice but not
    > > essential. The design should be fairly trivial, with many possible good ways to execute it.
    >
    > I've actually gone to the effort of making my living room "nice", so I made some out of ash and
    > strong curtain hooks I found at Home Depot. Ash is hardwood, and hard to work. I had it cut to
    > match the curved headboard/footboard of my bed, then finished it myself, trying to match the
    > staining. I used handlebar tape to cushion the bare metal hooks. 2" wood screws anchors one pair
    > per bike to studs. Works like a charm, and looks decent.

    What I find amusing about this post is that my *wife* would be horrified that you store your bikes
    in the living room...and I am wondering what kind of stain you used on the wood :)

    > I'm pretty sure I'm straight, BTW.

    Thanks for sharing :)

    Lee
     
  6. Erik Brooks

    Erik Brooks Guest

    > What I find amusing about this post is that my *wife* would be horrified that you store your bikes
    > in the living room...and I am wondering what kind of stain you used on the wood :)

    I hear ya. It occurred to me that the fireplace mantel was just the perfect size to place a bike
    on top. Woulda taken maybe 2 minutes to sweep the candles and other crap aside. I held a bike up
    there and asked her opinion, and it was NEGATIVE, can you believe it? maybe one of us is clueless,
    I dunno....
     
  7. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On 1 Oct 2003 14:16:51 -0700, [email protected] (Erik Brooks) wrote:
    >I hear ya. It occurred to me that the fireplace mantel was just the perfect size to place a bike on
    >top. Woulda taken maybe 2 minutes to sweep the candles and other crap aside. I held a bike up there
    >and asked her opinion, and it was NEGATIVE, can you believe it? maybe one of us is clueless, I
    >dunno....

    Well, some people just don't understand beautiful interior decorating.

    Maybe there's a feng shui (wow, I REALLY butchered the spelling on that one!) reason why a bike is
    good on a mantel.

    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  8. Funny, reminds me of the time I purchased Cinelli handlebars off a local cyclist. The seller had two
    Gios bikes, one hangging on the ceiling of his master bedroom and one hanging from the ceiling of
    his den near the living room. Both were in mint condition. The bikes were held with bright yellow
    rope so he could quickly untie them to be ridden. Obviously he wasn't married, but was at one time.
    ..and I thought only Mrs Lance Armstrong would understand....NOT! -tom

    "Rick Onanian" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On 1 Oct 2003 14:16:51 -0700, [email protected] (Erik Brooks) wrote:
    > >I hear ya. It occurred to me that the fireplace mantel was just the perfect size to place a bike
    > >on top. Woulda taken maybe 2 minutes to sweep the candles and other crap aside. I held a bike up
    > >there and asked her opinion, and it was NEGATIVE, can you believe it? maybe one of us is
    > >clueless, I dunno....
    >
    > Well, some people just don't understand beautiful interior decorating.
    >
    > Maybe there's a feng shui (wow, I REALLY butchered the spelling on that one!) reason why a bike is
    > good on a mantel.
    >
    > --
    > Rick Onanian
     
  9. Lee

    Lee Guest

    "Tom Nakashima" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Funny, reminds me of the time I purchased Cinelli handlebars off a local cyclist. The seller had
    > two Gios bikes, one hangging on the ceiling of his master bedroom and one hanging from the ceiling
    > of his den near the living room. Both were in
    mint
    > condition. The bikes were held with bright yellow rope so he could quickly untie them to be
    > ridden. Obviously he wasn't married, but was at one time. ..and I thought only Mrs Lance Armstrong
    > would understand....NOT! -tom
    >

    Wait a minute. This guy had ropes and pulleys hanging from the ceiling of his master bedroom and you
    thought it was for his *bicycle*.

    Tom, are you blonde?

    :)

    Lee
     
  10. Before I answer this, reality check....you are Female? and if not, I'll refer you to William the
    Refrigerator Perry. -tom

    "Lee" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > Wait a minute. This guy had ropes and pulleys hanging from the ceiling of his master bedroom and
    > you thought it was for his *bicycle*.
    >
    > Tom, are you blonde?
    >
    > :)
    >
    > Lee
     
  11. Andres Muro

    Andres Muro Guest

    For about 75 cents you can get a big plastic hook. Find a stud on the wall, high enough so that you
    can hang your bike. Screw the hook into the stud. Hang bike from front wheel. You can get them in
    red, yellow, blue or black to match your furniture. If you are worried about tire marks, put some
    masking tape where the tires will touch the wall.

    Andres

    "Me" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Hi I'm thinking about making my own stand that will allow me to hang my two bikes in my
    > living room.
    >
    > I use to have a $200+ oak wooden one that stretched from floor to ceiling and had two arms to hold
    > bikes, but I sold it a couple years ago when I moved out my apartment. Now I'm looking for
    > something similar but can't affoard to buy taht one or the equivalent Al models ($100+)
    >
    > Anyone ever make one of these themselves? They don;t look to hard, but I was hoping to find a site
    > that could suggest some plans and a list of materials...
    >
    > -thanks in advance...
     
  12. Dejavu

    Dejavu Guest

    Lee <[email protected]> scribed in <[email protected]>:

    >> anchors one pair per bike to studs. Works like a charm, and looks decent.
    >
    >What I find amusing about this post is that my *wife* would be horrified that you store your bikes
    >in the living room...and I am wondering what kind of stain you used on the wood :)

    lol my bike stands in the passage agaisnt the wall. my wifes (and the excercise monstrosity,um,
    bike) in the lounge the kids bikes go in the kids rooms, or else....

    swarf, steam and wind

    --
    David Forsyth -:- the email address is real /"\ http://terrapin.ru.ac.za/~iwdf/welcome.html \
    / ASCII Ribbon campaign against HTML E-Mail > - - - - - - -> X If you receive email saying
    "Send this to everyone you know," / \ PLEASE pretend you don't know me.
     
  13. Lee

    Lee Guest

    "Tom Nakashima" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > Before I answer this, reality check....you are Female?

    Not the last time I checked :)

    Lee

    >
    > "Lee" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > Wait a minute. This guy had ropes and pulleys hanging from the ceiling
    of
    > > his master bedroom and you thought it was for his *bicycle*.
    > >
    > > Tom, are you blonde?
    > >
    > > :)
    > >
    > > Lee
    > >
    > >
    >
     
  14. Raptor

    Raptor Guest

    I wrote:
    >>>anchors one pair per bike to studs. Works like a charm, and looks decent.
    >>
    DejaVU wrote:
    >>What I find amusing about this post is that my *wife* would be horrified that you store your bikes
    >>in the living room...and I am wondering what kind of stain you used on the wood :)

    I live in a boxy condo. If the bikes are inside, which they must be for security, they have to be in
    the living room. Tell her that bikes add character to a room, any room.

    --
    --
    Lynn Wallace http://www.xmission.com/~lawall "I'm not proud. We really haven't done everything we
    could to protect our customers. Our products just aren't engineered for security." --Microsoft VP in
    charge of Windows OS Development, Brian Valentine.
     
  15. Raptor <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    >
    > I've actually gone to the effort of making my living room "nice", so I made some out of ash and
    > strong curtain hooks I found at Home Depot. Ash is hardwood, and hard to work. I had it cut to
    > match the curved headboard/footboard of my bed, then finished it myself, trying to match the
    > staining. I used handlebar tape to cushion the bare metal hooks. 2" wood screws anchors one pair
    > per bike to studs. Works like a charm, and looks decent.

    You hang your bikes over your bed? How sweeeeet!

    > I'm pretty sure I'm straight, BTW.

    ROFL!

    Stella
     
  16. On 2 Oct 2003 16:03:08 -0700, [email protected] (andres muro) wrote:

    >For about 75 cents you can get a big plastic hook. Find a stud on the wall, high enough so that you
    >can hang your bike. Screw the hook into the stud. Hang bike from front wheel. You can get them in
    >red, yellow, blue or black to match your furniture. If you are worried about tire marks, put some
    >masking tape where the tires will touch the wall.
    >
    >Andres
    >

    I much prefer the hook in the ceiling method. This allows one to drap various articles of clothing,
    helmets, bags, etc from the bars and seat. Several bikes and a nice breeze constitute a mobil.
     
  17. On Tue, 30 Sep 2003 13:29:38 -0700, Me wrote:

    > Hi I'm thinking about making my own stand that will allow me to hang my two bikes in my
    > living room.
    >
    > I use to have a $200+ oak wooden one that stretched from floor to ceiling and had two arms to hold
    > bikes, but I sold it a couple years ago when I moved out my apartment. Now I'm looking for
    > something similar but can't affoard to buy taht one or the equivalent Al models ($100+)
    >
    > Anyone ever make one of these themselves? They don;t look to hard, but I was hoping to find a site
    > that could suggest some plans and a list of materials...
    >
    > -thanks in advance...

    I make a clone of one I saw in the Colorado Cyclists cataloge that is attached to a wall with
    screws. I had to add some padding to the arms where it supports the bicycle's top tube as the poplar
    I use was hard enough to scratch paint on my road bike.

    Richard "I like the fireplace mantle idea" Kaiser
     
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