anyone get chased by dogs?



Powerful Pete

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May 29, 2004
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jhuskey said:
I have been chased by those dogs as well. I would usually throw them a bone. A bone being a friend a lot more desperate than I.
A diversionary tactic.
"If you lay down with dogs you wake up with a hangover and a desire to poke out both eyes."
ROTFL. :D
 

oldbobcat

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Aug 31, 2003
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Cycler6n said:
whats a good way to scare them off when they start chasing you? :confused:
Used to bop them on the head with a long frame pump--preferably with a steel Campy head. Obviously, compact pumps and CO2 inflaters are not as effective.

I had a friend who used an old road sprinter tactic--pull the dog out into the road and then chop towards the curb or other immovable object. In one case it was a utility pole that the dog ran into head-on.

On one of my rides a large American standard poodle liked to chase me, but he was friendly and just wanted someone to run with for a while.
 

James Bruce Gil

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oldbobcat said:
Used to bop them on the head with a long frame pump--preferably with a steel Campy head. Obviously, compact pumps and CO2 inflaters are not as effective.

I had a friend who used an old road sprinter tactic--pull the dog out into the road and then chop towards the curb or other immovable object. In one case it was a utility pole that the dog ran into head-on.

On one of my rides a large American standard poodle liked to chase me, but he was friendly and just wanted someone to run with for a while.

OB,

The idea of running the dog into a stationary object works well, since when the dogs run at you they are generally looking up at you and not where they are running.

Often though they catch site of the object at the last moment and stop confused rather than making the "thud......yelp, yelp, yelp" sound that is so rewarding when you actually pull it off.

The other thing about this approach is that when you succeed with a dog, they don't seem to learn. You can do it to the same dog over and over again.

The other thing I have noticed is that if it doesn't work the first time, then it rarely works again either. That is unless you change things a little by say barking back back at the dog to make them concentrate more on you and less on other things going on around them.

Kind regards,
 

ravn

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May 8, 2007
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I'm glad to see that the "slowing down/stopping" and "spraying with stuff" people seem to be in the majority :). Riding fast to get by them just antagonizes them, and
even if it works, you're just training the dog to chase more.

Dogs are chasers by nature, and attracted to movement and sound. I've found that
slowing down, and/or stopping leg movement is the best first line of defense.

Prevention being most of the solution in this case, I'll do this if I see dogs near by,
on or off my path.

If they seem hell-bent to get me, I'll stop with my bike between me and them.
Dogs are also linear, and if they're actually going to attack, they go for whatever
you've got closest to them. Hold out your bike pump (don't whack at them, just hold
it out...) and they'll generally go for that rather than you.

ravn
 

Richmond Roadie

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Dec 16, 2006
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whats a good way to scare them off when they start chasing you? :confused:

I get chased on occasion. Depending on the type of dog I'll squirt them with my water bottle, yell at them, or sprint like hell (I'm not about to stop and get off my bike)!

I know of one who simply likes to "race me". She's a hoot! That little sucker can clip along at 23 mph!

I once drilled a Rotwiler in the face with my frame pump.
 

James Bruce Gil

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Aug 10, 2003
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Richmond Roadie said:
whats a good way to scare them off when they start chasing you? :confused:

I get chased on occasion. Depending on the type of dog I'll squirt them with my water bottle, yell at them, or sprint like hell (I'm not about to stop and get off my bike)!

I know of one who simply likes to "race me". She's a hoot! That little sucker can clip along at 23 mph!

I once drilled a Rotwiler in the face with my frame pump.

RR,

The other thing that has worked for me is, (sort of going along with what JHuskey said about throwing a bone), to take someone who animals just seem to select every time along with you on your ride.

My oldest son seems to attract all creatures great and small. Take him along and the dogs go for him every time. Any thing from crocodiles to mosquitos will pick him for preference.

If any body is complaining about insects having a meal its him, before any body else notices. We were camping in the bush on one occasion, and the only saltwater crocodile within fifty miles decided to rummage through his tent in the middle of the night.

This is very unusual behaviour for a crocodile, since we were some distance from the river and they are very territorial. The beast had walked past other tents to have a go at his! :)

Kind regards,
 

kdelong

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Dec 14, 2006
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James Bruce Gil said:
RR, We were camping in the bush on one occasion, and the only saltwater crocodile within fifty miles decided to rummage through his tent in the middle of the night.

This is very unusual behaviour for a crocodile, since we were some distance from the river and they are very territorial. The beast had walked past other tents to have a go at his! :)

Kind regards,
I sort of hate to bring this up, but here in the US we have alligators, a very close relative to crocs, and they tend to go after things that are rather odorous. Just a suggestion, does your son wear a lot of dead chicken scented cologne?:rolleyes:
 

James Bruce Gil

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kdelong said:
I sort of hate to bring this up, but here in the US we have alligators, a very close relative to crocs, and they tend to go after things that are rather odorous. Just a suggestion, does your son wear a lot of dead chicken scented cologne?:rolleyes:

KD,

Not that I have noticed. Believe me though, any animal will go for him first of all.

He was once a postman and I think this may have something to do with it. Have you noticed that no dogs ever seem to like the postman?

Kind regards,
 

Richmond Roadie

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Dec 16, 2006
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RR,

The other thing that has worked for me is, (sort of going along with what JHuskey said about throwing a bone), to take someone who animals just seem to select every time along with you on your ride.

My oldest son seems to attract all creatures great and small. Take him along and the dogs go for him every time. Any thing from crocodiles to mosquitos will pick him for preference.

If any body is complaining about insects having a meal its him, before any body else notices. We were camping in the bush on one occasion, and the only saltwater crocodile within fifty miles decided to rummage through his tent in the middle of the night.

This is very unusual behaviour for a crocodile, since we were some distance from the river and they are very territorial. The beast had walked past other tents to have a go at his! :)

Kind regards,


ROFL! That's great advice! Perhaps I need to find a "companion" who has some "animal magnitism"?:D
 

dbackmtg

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Oct 9, 2005
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I pass by this house with a rottweiler(sp) chained to a dog house. He's on one of my favorite climbs. I've probably passed him 15 to 20 times this year. Each time he pulls at his house and barks like mad. This dog is extremely large, even for a rotty. Tonight I went riding by and he did his usual tugging and barking and the next thing I know he's right beside me ready to take a bite of my leg. All I could do was yell at the dog. There was no way I was going to outrun him going uphill. Thankfully the owner heard my yelling and came out and called the dog off. It scared the **** out of me. I wish everyone could see the size of this chain that the dog was tied to. It is heavy duty chain, the kind you would pull a stump out with. I don't know how he broke it? It is one big dog!
 

kdelong

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Dec 14, 2006
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dbackmtg said:
I pass by this house with a rottweiler(sp) chained to a dog house. He's on one of my favorite climbs. I've probably passed him 15 to 20 times this year. Each time he pulls at his house and barks like mad. This dog is extremely large, even for a rotty. Tonight I went riding by and he did his usual tugging and barking and the next thing I know he's right beside me ready to take a bite of my leg. All I could do was yell at the dog. There was no way I was going to outrun him going uphill. Thankfully the owner heard my yelling and came out and called the dog off. It scared the **** out of me. I wish everyone could see the size of this chain that the dog was tied to. It is heavy duty chain, the kind you would pull a stump out with. I don't know how he broke it? It is one big dog!
I think I wouold cross this route off until that dog dies. No matter how nice the climb is, you can't enjoy it with half of your leg missing:eek: .
 

James Bruce Gil

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kdelong said:
I think I wouold cross this route off until that dog dies. No matter how nice the climb is, you can't enjoy it with half of your leg missing:eek: .

KdL,

Quite often dogs become savage because they are tied up and don't get enough exercise.

If the Rotty was allowed enough room to move about and mark out a patch inside his master's property he would very likely not be so nasty.

Kind regards,
 

BanditBoyDavid

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Jul 14, 2004
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Cycler6n said:
whats a good way to scare them off when they start chasing you? :confused:
I get chased by dogs all the time, and the best way to get rid of them is to spray them with whatever is in your waterbottle (gatorade really stings their eyes);) .
 

Cycler6n

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Jan 5, 2007
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BanditBoyDavid said:
I get chased by dogs all the time, and the best way to get rid of them is to spray them with whatever is in your waterbottle (gatorade really stings their eyes);) .

I'll have to try that, i hear even lemon juice works well
 

dbackmtg

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Oct 9, 2005
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kdelong said:
I think I wouold cross this route off until that dog dies. No matter how nice the climb is, you can't enjoy it with half of your leg missing:eek: .

I'm actually going to climb the other side and then descend on the doggy side.
 

dbackmtg

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Oct 9, 2005
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James Bruce Gil said:
KdL,

Quite often dogs become savage because they are tied up and don't get enough exercise.

If the Rotty was allowed enough room to move about and mark out a patch inside his master's property he would very likely not be so nasty.

Kind regards,

The residence has a lot to be desired. Junk strewn thruout the yard. the place is a shambles. I do feel sorry for the dog. You can tell it isn't well cared for. It must eat well due to its size though. My friend had a rotty and it was as pleasant as could be. I don't believe in tying dogs up.
 

kdelong

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Dec 14, 2006
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I don't beleive in tying them up either, but you also can't just let them run loose unless you can fence them in. This in itself can be challenging as I saw a "rescued" stray run up a six foot tall chainlink fence. The dog only stood 28 cm at the shoulder but he would run a lap around the yard to gain speed and then would sort of run diagonally up and over the fence. It was really quite amazing to see it happen.
 

JohnO

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Jul 5, 2003
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Haven't had too much trouble. Anyone care to join me? We're riding with Eddie today.