Anyone Not Been Hit?

Discussion in 'Commuting and Road Safety' started by jutabraonl, Jul 9, 2015.

  1. jutabraonl

    jutabraonl New Member

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    So I pick up my new-to-me commuter bike from her tune up tomorrow. Been reading and reading, have a rear rack being installed as part of the tune-up, have helmet, gloves, shorts left over from old cycling days, a Vaude Cycle 28 pannier/rucksack on the way, 2 bright lights, a U and chain lock, and emergency repair supplies.

    I have to admit I'm getting a bit nervous about getting hit by a car- it seems like it happens to everyone and people accept it as part of commuting. Obviously I know the risk is there and one must ride safely... Drivers are crazy in this town. I plan to adventure out when I pick her up in light traffic tomorrow evening to get a feel for road riding in my general radius of travel... Also want to find neighborhood route to avoid a very busy, pot-holey, "35 mph" racer road. I will be riding to work at about 6:15 am, where bright lights and light traffic should keep me pretty secure. Plan to leave early and enjoy the ride, not race. Little worried when I leave work late and am dealing with angry tired motorists trying to fly home.
     
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  2. Corzhens

    Corzhens Well-Known Member

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    If you are safety conscious like me, there is a very slim probability that you will be hit by a vehicle. First off, you should be on the proper side of the road. Secondly, you should be aware of what's behind you. I understand that there are vehicles that are speeding so you will not be able to sense. In instances like that, rule number one will protect you. Your speed should always depend on the type of road. For secondary roads with pedestrians, it is unsafe to run faster than 30 kph. I hope that helps.
     
  3. gavinfree

    gavinfree Member

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    I mean, I live in a pretty busy county with thousands of people on the roads in each individual city throughout the day, but I wouldn't say that I fear getting hit by a car. It can happen, but I don't plan to go out and get hit. It's not necessarily part of commuting, at least if you ask me. If it's that big of a concern, then it's indeed a good idea to travel during light traffic hours and to avoid rush hour or times when motorists might be a little angsty to get home or wherever they're going.
     
  4. welshdude3

    welshdude3 Member

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    In being a Cummuting/utility cyclist for a large part of my adult life there are 3 things in reference to cycling in traffic I've learned:
    1) You're a 200 lb max self propelled SLOW vehicle sharing roads with 4000 lb mechanically propelled FAST vehicles. Never lose sight of that reality.
    2) Eye to eye contact whenever you're making a maneuver in proximity to a car or truck. NEVER wear sunglasses when riding in traffic. A 8.00 set of plastic goggles from HD or Lowe's are perfect.
    3) Hold your line and make your intentions CLEAR using eye to eye and pointing. Be assertive not aggressive. If there is no choice but to take the lane? Take the lane.

    There are plenty of others, but you'll make adjustments as time goes on and will tailer your approach as experience and confidence grows. One piece of equipment I've found that never fails is a simple official's whistle. When in heavy traffic keep it in your mouth and USE IT. NOBODY ignores a sharp blast. Like I said, be assertive.
     
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  5. Corzhens

    Corzhens Well-Known Member

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    Since it is always difficult to get a ride in public transport, the so called 2-wheels are getting very popular over here. Riders always have companions on the road so it's not really that scary (for them because they are used to that). I just notice sometimes, when I am driving my car, that bikers would cross my path in order to get ahead during heavy traffic, i.e. when vehicles are crawling. So instead of the car hitting the biker, it's often the biker hitting the car. And then? The biker will just say sorry. That's the road condition of our main streets.
     
  6. Keyan

    Keyan Member

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    I am more concern about hitting someone when I ride a bike. I am thankful though that I have not been hit by any vehicle and I am hoping that every time I go out and use my bike I will be back safely and in one piece
     
  7. JSWin

    JSWin Member

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    Shhhhh, don't say it. I've commuted with the bike and i love it. This is true though it can be dangerous. Drivers really don't pay attention so you have to pay attention even more than normal. They take turns and don't look while they are rolling. It is actually disturbing how some people drive. You just need to seriously be able to think on your feet and anticipate what they could do. Be cautious and allow for enough time.
     
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  8. Corzhens

    Corzhens Well-Known Member

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    Hahahaaa, but you are right. Some drivers don't pay much attention to riders so you have to be extra careful. Now, this made me recall the advice of one rider in an organized group, that is to wear the proper riding attire - helmet, knee pads, elbow pads, and at night you should have the lights to make you visible enough for other drivers. And riding during the daytime in heavy traffic, do not force your way in between vehicles because that irks the car drivers... like me.
     
  9. BikeBikeBikeBike

    BikeBikeBikeBike Well-Known Member

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    This is really good advice.
    I have never been hit, only had a few close calls.
    Can I also stress situational awareness? It's very important you are paying attention to everything that's going on around you, my ears help just as much as my eyes.
    Everyone on this forum is still alive and kicking, some of the members have been in the saddle longer then I have been alive!
    Biking is not as dangerous as most think it to be, you just have to conduct yourself properly and you will be fine.
     
  10. 9lines

    9lines Member

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    Obeying traffic signs is one of the important things. Making use of the mirrors. Riding on low speeds whenever approaching traffic or completely avoiding traffic. Those are some of the tips that have made me avoid accidents.
     
  11. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    If you keep your eyes and ears open, obey all traffic laws like you would in a car, going the extra mile by looking both ways even though the light is in your favor, taking the lane when necessary (and knowing when to do so), don't come to a stop alongside any vehicle waiting for a light or stop sign especially a large vehicle like a truck or RV thus stay behind the vehicle but just to the right so you can see their eyes in their mirror.

    Read this for more info: http://bicyclesafe.com/

    To add to the section of The Door Prize from the above website, always keep your eyes looking through the back window then to the side mirror as you approach a parked car, if you see someone sitting in the driver's seat they could suddenly open the door but if you follow what the website says you should be ok, but the car could also suddenly pull out in front of you. In some tight streets it's best to just take the lane staying as far from the park cars as you can.
     
  12. Damien Lee

    Damien Lee Active Member

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    I only got hit when I was much younger. Fortunately, that incident taught me a lesson and I became far more safety conscious on the roads. Even as a normal pedestrian I'm always checking and double-checking road traffic at all times. When I'm riding my bicycle I'm on constant alert on both the condition of the road and all other roads users at any given time. This has helped me avoid another nasty accident although there have been a few close calls.
     
  13. Susimi

    Susimi Well-Known Member

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    I've had a few close calls but I've not been hit by anyone and I do not intend to change that. (Touch wood)

    I've had a few scrapes and ran in to things when I was younger but I think that's something we've all done in our younger years.
     
  14. AtlantaSports

    AtlantaSports New Member

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    I have definitely not been hit but I have had some close calls due to some idiot drivers.
     
  15. sunshiney

    sunshiney Member

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    It can be dangerous, you're going out on the road with much bigger and faster machines.
    You can keep yourself safe however by staying alert, staying visible, and making your intentions clear when you intend to turn, stop etc.
    I commute by bike quite frequently and I've had my back tire clipped at low speed by a woman coming out of a parking lot when I had the right of way, but besides that I've only had one close call and that was on a back road I probably shouldn't have been cycling on.
    Use your common sense and you'll be fine. Everyone who leaves their house in the morning is taking a certain risk no matter how they commute, but there's a lot we can do to mitigate those risks :)
    Another big one is to make sure you've got lights and/or reflective clothing if you plan to cycle at night.
     
  16. ZXD22

    ZXD22 Member

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    Nope I have never been hit by a car before. If you drive on the same way the cars are going in your direction and are lucky enough that a drunk driver is not passing by while wearing the proper clothes for night or dusk time biking, you should be fine!
     
  17. doctorold

    doctorold Member

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    I have not been hit but like many, I have had my close calls. There are roads I will ride in what I call "off hours" (when it's not rush hour). There are also roads I will not ride. Bike lanes help somewhat but you're not completely safe in bike lanes due to distracted driving. Just last week my son got hit while riding in the city in a bike lane. He's a very experienced rider too. He has vowed to ride more offensively in order to compensate for those who are crappy drivers. There's also the theory of "taking the lane" when there's no bike lane rather than ride to the right where some cars get the idea that they can pass safely and then end up knocking bikes off the road. Some drivers get pissed with that but if you're not getting sideswiped, that's a good thing. They need to share the road anyway. Just be aware and be smart.
     
  18. Okaviator

    Okaviator New Member

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    Just make sure that you have situational awareness when crossing a road. When bikers don't have situational awareness is when they usually get hit
     
  19. JetWing34

    JetWing34 New Member

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    I almost did get hit by another commuter bicycle before, and that was back in the day before my city I am residing in didn't have bike lanes. However, roads that I can't ride are the state highways in the city areas. I even feel a little overprotective over myself when I ride on the roads with no bike lane. Rule of thumb, if you find a provincial or state highway without lanes or space for bicycles, avoid it.
     
  20. sharkantropo

    sharkantropo Member

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    I also got some few "close call" moments under my belt, or shall I say, my pedals. Curiously, most of them happened under the allegedly secure residential roads. People tend to be over confident there.
     
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