Anyone taking ZETIA?

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by Ed, Mar 6, 2004.

  1. Ed

    Ed Guest

    My cardiologist has put me on 10mg/day of Zetia.

    Has anyone had any experience with this drug? What side
    effects have you had if any?

    Is it as effective as a statin?

    Can it be taken with naicin?

    Are there any natural/vitamin non drug medications that will
    lower cholesterol?

    Thanks for your replies.

    Ed M.
     
    Tags:


  2. Ed wrote:

    > My cardiologist has put me on 10mg/day of Zetia.
    >
    > Has anyone had any experience with this drug?

    I have through prescribing it.

    > What side effects have you had if any?

    Some of my patients have had muscle aches with it.

    >
    > Is it as effective as a statin?
    >

    No.

    >
    > Can it be taken with naicin?
    >

    Yes.

    >
    > Are there any natural/vitamin non drug medications that
    > will lower cholesterol?
    >

    There are but I am not at liberty to go into the specifics,
    here. Sorry.

    >
    > Thanks for your replies.
    >

    Praises to God, Ed.

    Servant to the humblest person in the universe,

    Andrew

    --
    Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD
    Board-Certified Cardiologist
    http://www.heartmdphd.com/

    **
    Who is the humblest person in the universe?
    http://makeashorterlink.com/?W1F522557

    What is all this about?
    http://makeashorterlink.com/?A26B16397

    Is this spam?
    http://makeashorterlink.com/?N69721867
     
  3. Ed

    Ed Guest

    Where can I find info about Zetia on the WWW?
    "Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Ed wrote:
    >
    > > My cardiologist has put me on 10mg/day of Zetia.
    > >
    > > Has anyone had any experience with this drug?
    >
    > I have through prescribing it.
    >
    > > What side effects have you had if any?
    >
    > Some of my patients have had muscle aches with it.
    >
    > >
    > > Is it as effective as a statin?
    > >
    >
    > No.
    >
    > >
    > > Can it be taken with naicin?
    > >
    >
    > Yes.
    >
    > >
    > > Are there any natural/vitamin non drug medications that
    > > will lower cholesterol?
    > >
    >
    > There are but I am not at liberty to go into the
    > specifics, here. Sorry.
    >
    > >
    > > Thanks for your replies.
    > >
    >
    > Praises to God, Ed.
    >
    >
    > Servant to the humblest person in the universe,
    >
    > Andrew
    >
    > --
    > Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD Board-Certified Cardiologist
    > http://www.heartmdphd.com/
    >
    > ** Who is the humblest person in the universe?
    > http://makeashorterlink.com/?W1F522557
    >
    > What is all this about?
    > http://makeashorterlink.com/?A26B16397
    >
    > Is this spam? http://makeashorterlink.com/?N69721867
     
  4. listener

    listener Guest

    On Sat, 06 Mar 2004 15:11:03 GMT, "Ed" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >My cardiologist has put me on 10mg/day of Zetia.
    >
    >Has anyone had any experience with this drug? What side
    >effects have you had if any?
    >
    >Is it as effective as a statin?
    >
    >Can it be taken with naicin?
    >
    >Are there any natural/vitamin non drug medications that
    >will lower cholesterol?
    >
    >Thanks for your replies.
    >
    >Ed M.
    >

    I took it for a short time last year. Recently, I stopped
    many of my meds because my liver enzymes spiked and I was
    about to go on a strong med that also could effect the
    liver. I'm hoping to go back on my statin soon... probably
    not with Zetia - just too many pills to remember to take!

    It's usually prescribed in addition to your regular statin.
    I experienced no side-effects and it did improve my numbers
    quite a bit.

    L.
     
  5. Hj

    Hj Guest

    "Elva4" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > >Where can I find info about Zetia on the WWW?
    >
    > http://www.zetia.com/ezetimibe/zetia/consumer/site_map/i-
    > ndex.jsp
    >
    > This drug is mainly used to lower LDL . Good
    > luck....Virginia
    >
    In June 2003, Schering-Plough altered the label for
    Zetia to include a warning that it may be associated
    with allergic reactions, including angioedema, a skin
    disease characterized by patches of circumscribed
    swelling of the hands, feet, lips and eyelids. Patients
    suffering from angioedema often experience swelling of
    the mucous membranes and the viscera (internal organs of
    the body). Breathing is sometimes difficult, and in
    severe cases the disease can be fatal. Rash has also
    been linked to Zetia use.
     
  6. Don Kirkman

    Don Kirkman Guest

  7. Sonos

    Sonos Guest

    On 6-Mar-2004, "Ed" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > Is it as effective as a statin?

    You are implying that statins are the 'gold standard'
    by which to measure all other interventions, which is a
    dangerous mistake. However, the mechanism of ezetimibe
    (Zetia) is not a unique mechanism, and is different
    from statins.

    >
    > Can it be taken with naicin?

    yes.

    >
    > Are there any natural/vitamin non drug medications that
    > will lower cholesterol?

    Plant sterols inhibit intestinal cholesterol absorption in a
    similar manner that zetia does, are less expensive and
    available without prescription.

    As to other food supplements to address cholesterol (among
    other issues as well), you might look into the following:

    Guggul extract Niacin Policosanol Red Yeast Rice extract

    and several others.

    I might add that there are more important therapeutic issues
    other than cholesterol to consider if you are attempting to
    attenuate atherosclerosis.

    --
    Winning against heart attack and stroke
    http://www.sonoscore.com
     
  8. Sonos

    Sonos Guest

    On 6-Mar-2004, "Ed" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > Is it as effective as a statin?

    You are implying that statins are the 'gold standard'
    by which to measure all other interventions, which is a
    dangerous mistake. However, the mechanism of ezetimibe
    (Zetia) is not a unique mechanism, and is different
    from statins.

    >
    > Can it be taken with naicin?

    yes.

    >
    > Are there any natural/vitamin non drug medications that
    > will lower cholesterol?

    Plant sterols inhibit intestinal cholesterol absorption in a
    similar manner that zetia does, are less expensive and
    available without prescription.

    As to other food supplements to address cholesterol (among
    other issues as well), you might look into the following:

    Guggul extract Niacin Policosanol Red Yeast Rice extract

    and several others.

    I might add that there are more important therapeutic issues
    other than cholesterol to consider if you are attempting to
    attenuate atherosclerosis.

    --
    Winning against heart attack and stroke
    http://www.sonoscore.com
     
  9. Sonos

    Sonos Guest

    On 6-Mar-2004, "Ed" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > Is it as effective as a statin?

    You are implying that statins are the 'gold standard'
    by which to measure all other interventions, which is a
    dangerous mistake. However, the mechanism of ezetimibe
    (Zetia) is not a unique mechanism, and is different
    from statins.

    >
    > Can it be taken with naicin?

    yes.

    >
    > Are there any natural/vitamin non drug medications that
    > will lower cholesterol?

    Plant sterols inhibit intestinal cholesterol absorption in a
    similar manner that zetia does, are less expensive and
    available without prescription.

    As to other food supplements to address cholesterol (among
    other issues as well), you might look into the following:

    Guggul extract Niacin Policosanol Red Yeast Rice extract

    and several others.

    I might add that there are more important therapeutic issues
    other than cholesterol to consider if you are attempting to
    attenuate atherosclerosis.

    --
    Winning against heart attack and stroke
    http://www.sonoscore.com
     
  10. listener

    listener Guest

    On Mon, 8 Mar 2004 14:39:28 GMT, "Sonos" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Plant sterols inhibit intestinal cholesterol absorption in
    >a similar manner that zetia does, are less expensive and
    >available without prescription.
    >
    >As to other food supplements to address cholesterol (among
    >other issues as well), you might look into the following:
    >
    >Guggul extract Niacin Policosanol Red Yeast Rice extract

    Just to clarify something: re: expense.

    For people who have health care, like my self, it is *much*
    more cost effective to take a statin to lower cholesterol
    numbers than pay for these OTC options. I just came from my
    local Vitamin Shoppe and can vouch for that. Under my health
    plan, I pay $10 for any 90-day prescription.

    As someone who takes supplements, their cost begins to add
    up quickly.

    L.
     
  11. Hj

    Hj Guest

    "Sonos" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > As to other food supplements to address cholesterol (among
    > other issues as well), you might look into the following:
    >
    > Guggul extract

    from JAMA Vol.290 No. 6, August 13, 2003

    "Despite plausible mechanisms of action, guggulipid did not
    appear to improve levels of serum cholesterol over the short
    term in this population of adults with hypercholesterolemia,
    and might in fact raise levels of LDL-C. Guggulipid also
    appeared to cause a dermatologic hypersensitivity reaction
    in some patients."

    http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/abstract/290/6/765
     
  12. Sonos

    Sonos Guest

    On 8-Mar-2004, "hj" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > from JAMA Vol.290 No. 6, August 13, 2003
    >
    > "Despite plausible mechanisms of action, guggulipid did
    > not appear to improve levels of serum cholesterol over the
    > short term in this population of adults with
    > hypercholesterolemia, and might in fact raise levels of
    > LDL-C. Guggulipid also appeared to cause a dermatologic
    > hypersensitivity reaction in some patients."

    Interesting study, I'm always glad to see research activity
    in well known journals. Not suprisingly this is a small
    study of short duration. Most nutritional supplement studies
    suffer from relative disinterest in funding compared to
    prescription medications. "dermatologic hypersensitivity" is
    a minor complication however, and reversible with cessation
    of the supplement.

    Here is another reference you might like, although it is not
    exhaustive by any means. A systematic review of "mono
    preparations" with only lipid profiles as the outcome.
    However, when taken in combination, supplements can provide
    a synergistic effect on lipids, at least it has for some
    people in my experience. More often than not, I prefer to
    add prescription medication to nutraceuticals if individual
    goals are not met. Fortunately, these ingredients appear to
    facilitate lower dose prescription medications and augment
    their desired effects.

    The Journal of Family Practice • June 2003 • Vol. 52, No. 6

    Herbs for serum cholesterol reduction: A systematic review

    Joanna S. Thompson Coon, PhD, BSc (Hons) and Edzard Ernst,
    MD, PhD, FRCP (Edin) Peninsula Medical School, Universities
    of Exeter and Plymouth, Exeter, United Kingdom

    ABSTRACT

    Objectives To systematically review the clinical evidence
    for herbal medicinal products in the treatment of
    hypercholesterolemia.

    Study Design A systematic review of randomized clinical
    trials of herbal medicinal products used to lower serum
    cholesterol. Systematic literature searches were conducted
    in 6 electronic data-bases. The reference lists of all
    papers and our files were searched for more relevant
    publications. Experts in the field and manufacturers of
    identified herbal medicinal products were contacted for
    published and unpublished data. No language restrictions
    were imposed.

    Outcomes Measured All randomized clinical trials of serum
    cholesterol reduction, in which mono-preparations of herbal
    medicinal products were administered as supplements to human
    subjects, were included.

    Results Twenty-five randomized clinical trials involving 11
    herbal medicinal products were identified. Guggul
    (Commiphora mukul), fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum),
    red yeast rice, and artichoke (Cynara scolymus) have been
    most extensively studied and have demonstrated reductions in
    total serum cholesterol levels of between10% and 33%. The
    methodological quality as assessed by the Jadad score was
    less than 3 (maximum, 5) for 13 of the 25 trials.

    Conclusions Many herbal medicinal products have potential
    hypocholesterolemic activity and encouraging safety
    profiles. However, only a limited amount of clinical
    research exists to support their efficacy. Further research
    is warranted to establish the value of these extracts in the
    treatment of hypercholesterolemia.

    http://tinyurl.com/2mpo9

    --
    Winning against heart attack and stroke
    http://www.sonoscore.com
     
  13. Kathy

    Kathy Guest

    "Ed" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > My cardiologist has put me on 10mg/day of Zetia.
    >
    > Has anyone had any experience with this drug? What side
    > effects have you had if any?
    >
    > Is it as effective as a statin?
    >
    > Can it be taken with naicin?
    >
    > Are there any natural/vitamin non drug medications that
    > will lower cholesterol?
    >
    > Thanks for your replies.
    >
    > Ed M.

    Why take a fairly new drug for which there is very
    little experience, when there is so much more known
    about the statins.

    Personaly, I would not be interested in being a guinea pig
    for the Merck. There is no evidence yet that this drug helps
    with important things like mortality and heart attacks.

    Kathy
     
  14. Kathy

    Kathy Guest

    "Sonos" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    > I might add that there are more important therapeutic
    > issues other than cholesterol to consider if you are
    > attempting to attenuate atherosclerosis.

    Could you tell us what those are?

    Thanks,

    Kathy
     
  15. Kathy

    Kathy Guest

    "Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Ed wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > Are there any natural/vitamin non drug medications that
    > > will lower cholesterol?
    > >
    >
    > There are but I am not at liberty to go into the
    > specifics, here. Sorry.
    >

    Sure you are. You are at liberty write about anything
    you please.

    Kathy
     
  16. Kathy

    Kathy Guest

    "Ed" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<fBn2c.2607$> > >
    > >
    > > >
    > > > Are there any natural/vitamin non drug medications
    > > > that will lower cholesterol?

    Barley, 24% LDL reduction. Probably safer than Zetia.

    --------------------------------------

    Lipids significantly reduced by diets containing barley in
    moderately hypercholesterolemic men.

    Behall KM, Scholfield DJ, Hallfrisch J.

    Diet & Human Performance Laboratory, Beltsville Human
    Nutrition Research Center, Agricultural Research Service,
    United States Department of Agriculture, Beltsville, MD
    20705, USA. [email protected]

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether barley, as the soluble fiber
    source, would beneficially change cardiovascular risk
    factors. Soluble fiber from oats has been recognized as
    beneficial in decreasing blood cholesterol levels. Although
    barley contains high amounts of soluble fiber, it is not
    consumed as extensively as oats. METHODS: Eighteen
    moderately hypercholesterolemic men (28-62 y) consumed a
    controlled equilibration diet (Step 1, 30% fat, 55%
    carbohydrate, 15% protein, < 300 mg cholesterol) for 2 weeks
    followed by the diet with about 20% of energy replaced with
    brown rice/whole wheat, (1/2) barley & (1/2) brown
    rice/whole wheat or barley (< 0.4 g, 3 g and 6 g added
    soluble fiber/2800 kcal, respectively) for 5 weeks in a
    Latin square design. Fasting blood was drawn twice weekly.
    Total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and triacylglycerols
    were measured enzymatically and lipid fractions were
    measured by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.
    RESULTS: Compared with prestudy concentrations, total
    cholesterol (14%, 17%, and 20%, respectively) and LDL
    cholesterol (17%, 17%, and 24%, respectively) were
    significantly lower (p < .0001) after the low, medium, and
    high-soluble fiber diets. Triacylglycerol was 6%, 10%, and
    16% lower (p = 0.09) whereas HDL cholesterol (9%, 7%, and
    18%) was higher (p < 0.001) after the experimental diets.
    Total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol after the high-soluble
    fiber diet were significantly lower than concentrations
    after the low- or medium-soluble fiber diets. Mean LDL
    particle number significantly decreased (p < 0.007) and the
    large LDL cholesterol fraction showed a trend toward lower
    concentrations (p = 0.06). CONCLUSION: Increasing soluble
    fiber through consumption of barley in a healthy diet can
    reduce cardiovascular risk factors.
     
  17. Sonos

    Sonos Guest

    On 10-Mar-2004, [email protected] (Kathy) wrote:

    > "Sonos" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    > >
    > > I might add that there are more important therapeutic
    > > issues other than cholesterol to consider if you are
    > > attempting to attenuate atherosclerosis.
    >
    > Could you tell us what those are?
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Kathy

    Sorry I didn't get to this earlier.

    1. endothelial dysfunction
    2. inflammation
    3. oxidation
    4. homocysteine
    5. healthy metabolism of lipids
    6. platelet aggregation

    --
    Winning against heart attack and stroke
    http://www.sonoscore.com
     
  18. Sonos

    Sonos Guest

    On 8-Mar-2004, [email protected] wrote:

    > Just to clarify something: re: expense.
    >
    > For people who have health care, like my self, it is
    > *much* more cost effective to take a statin to lower
    > cholesterol numbers than pay for these OTC options. I just
    > came from my local Vitamin Shoppe and can vouch for that.
    > Under my health plan, I pay $10 for any 90-day
    > prescription.
    >
    > As someone who takes supplements, their cost begins to add
    > up quickly.

    If you define your health by the amount of dollars in your
    pocket, you are missing the boat.

    --
    Winning against heart attack and stroke
    http://www.sonoscore.com
     
  19. Sonos

    Sonos Guest

    On 10-Mar-2004, [email protected] (Kathy) wrote:

    > > > > Are there any natural/vitamin non drug medications
    > > > > that will lower cholesterol?
    >
    > Barley, 24% LDL reduction. Probably safer than Zetia.

    Any complications from Barley? Think of the number of
    'patients' who have taken barley (including children and
    pregnant women) over the course of 1,000 years and the
    reported complication rate. Now think of the number of
    'patients' who have taken Zetia, and the reported
    complication rate.

    Who wins?

    Bravo for barley.

    There is so much more!

    --
    Winning against heart attack and stroke
    http://www.sonoscore.com
     
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