Anyone using Campy Record/Super Record?



Dr Lodge

Member
May 3, 2012
109
6
0
Originally Posted by CAMPYBOB .

The Chorus nickel plated steel cassette gears will outwear the Record Ti (large inner set) gears by many miles. Congratulations on the Record group. Now...go practice you shimaNO smirk and SRAM snicker!
And the "I've got Compag-ho-ho-ho" tears of joy /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif
 

danfoz

Well-Known Member
Apr 12, 2011
2,432
184
48
Originally Posted by Dr Lodge .
Thanks for all your comments and replies guys. I have gone for Super Record, with the exception of Chorus cassette (12-27 to go with 34/50 chainset) and chain. The frame is pearl white with black and there is a mix of black and white throughout the components, saddle and bars. Its gonna look well cool /img/vbsmilies/smilies/cool.gif
Nice! We REALLY will need to see some pictures once built up to verify this story.

Fyi, the one thing I noticed about the 11spd in the first couple of weeks was a little more barrel tweaking as the cables stretch out. However once settled in, it shifts better, faster, and smoother than any groupset or component mishmash I've run in he last 3 decades, and the dual pivots stop on a dime in the wet and don't leave an abundance of residue on my rims. Apparently Campy has had some questionable generations, I don't believe this is one of them.
 

Dr Lodge

Member
May 3, 2012
109
6
0
Originally Posted by danfoz .
Nice! We REALLY will need to see some pictures once built up to verify this story.
Oh yes, I'll be taking LOTS of photos when I get it, blow them up to poster size and put some bike **** on my bedroom wall lol. ETA is around November, current lead time is 25 weeks but might be a little shorter I'm told. These 953 frames take a while to build, take ages to get the tubes in and there is high demand.

The paint job is based on this Condor frame, but with black on the head tube to match the black Ritchey WCS carbon forks, mixing in to the black underside top and down tubes, but pearl white rear stays. Shiny black with white lettering Ritchey WCS stem, Logic bars and seat post, white Selle Italia Flite Gel Flow saddle, white bar tape and black hoods.
 

CAMPYBOB

Well-Known Member
Sep 12, 2005
11,945
2,086
113
Fyi, the one thing I noticed about the 11spd in the first couple of weeks was a little more barrel tweaking as the cables stretch out.

Weird...my 11-speed has required zero tweaking and the Campy wires have not stretched a MM as far as I can tell (2K'ish miles from new). I was warned that the 11-speed was a bit more noisey and finicky to keep set up properly than the 10-speed stuff, but I have not found this to be true.

However once settled in, it shifts better, faster, and smoother than any groupset or component mishmash I've run in he last 3 decades,

I put it equal to my two 10-speed Campy bikes with perhaps just a bit more 'notchy' shift actuation. The thumb button requires a bit more pressure to actuate and the return is a bit slower than my 10-speed stuff. I'm guessing it's due to stronger springs (or deeper detents?) as it should be fully broken in by now.

and the dual pivots stop on a dime in the wet and don't leave an abundance of residue on my rims.

True that! After coming off a Chorus single-pivot rear bike, the reborn double-pivot brakes actually...BRAKE! Good stuff.

I was riding with a friend the other afternoon. He has a nice Cannondale with SRAM Force/Hollowtech/compact rings. My Gawd, what a noisey shifting rig that is. And every time we hit a steep climb I was already geared down 2 or 3 and climbing hard while he was still fishing around. Probably too much fiberglass in crank arms.
 

danfoz

Well-Known Member
Apr 12, 2011
2,432
184
48
Originally Posted by CAMPYBOB .

Fyi, the one thing I noticed about the 11spd in the first couple of weeks was a little more barrel tweaking as the cables stretch out.

Weird...my 11-speed has required zero tweaking and the Campy wires have not stretched a MM as far as I can tell (2K'ish miles from new). I was warned that the 11-speed was a bit more noisey and finicky to keep set up properly than the 10-speed stuff, but I have not found this to be true.

[COLOR= #0000ff]Out of the shop it was smooth as silk and I was very excited about the performance but each day brought more and more sloppy shifting. Each succesive barrel adjustment has taken longer to be required but I remember running my 7800 for months at a time w/o a single adjustment. First week I needed 2 tweaks, second and third weeks one tweak, fourth week seems to be taking hold.[/COLOR]

However once settled in, it shifts better, faster, and smoother than any groupset or component mishmash I've run in he last 3 decades,

I put it equal to my two 10-speed Campy bikes with perhaps just a bit more 'notchy' shift actuation. The thumb button requires a bit more pressure to actuate and the return is a bit slower than my 10-speed stuff. I'm guessing it's due to stronger springs (or deeper detents?) as it should be fully broken in by now.

[COLOR= #0000ff]I think my Athena 11 shifters, although the older 2010 Ultra Shift model, differ from the Chorus/Record/Super-Record brifters. One reviewer indicated they felt more "plasticky" than the higher end parts. I have no frame of reference but I don't doubt it - there is a significantly different feel to the current gen 105, Ultegra, and Dura-Ace shifters, with the DA being a significant step above, at least as far as "feel" (think slamming a Mercedes door shut vs. an old Chevy). Accordingly my next upgrade will be right to a set of Record shifters, not a new RD as many folks seem to choose for their first component upgrade. Unfortunately for OP, he's got nowhere left to go /img/vbsmilies/smilies/biggrin.gif[/COLOR]

and the dual pivots stop on a dime in the wet and don't leave an abundance of residue on my rims.

True that! After coming off a Chorus single-pivot rear bike, the reborn double-pivot brakes actually...BRAKE! Good stuff.

[COLOR= #0000ff]My group came with dual pivot front and rear. Initially I was a little dissapointed as the single pivot rear looks beautiful, and coming from the motorcycle world we know the front break does the lion share anyway. However I will probably stick with the dulies front and rear for the forseeable future.[/COLOR]

I was riding with a friend the other afternoon. He has a nice Cannondale with SRAM Force/Hollowtech/compact rings. My Gawd, what a noisey shifting rig that is. And every time we hit a steep climb I was already geared down 2 or 3 and climbing hard while he was still fishing around. Probably too much fiberglass in crank arms.

[COLOR= #0000ff]Ultra-shift baby![/COLOR]
 

CAMPYBOB

Well-Known Member
Sep 12, 2005
11,945
2,086
113
I have to agree...painful as it is to even think the thought, let alone type it out!...Dura Ass stuff is smooth as silk. I've owned several Japanese vehicles and they are utterly without soul or emotion. But...they are smooth as sewing machines in function of everything from switches to handles to knobs to the motor and transmission.

One attribute of Campagnolo I've always appreciated was its durability.

It ages much better than the Japanese stuff, IMO.

My 1972 dated Record rear derailleur has untold miles on it and it's as tight as a nun's...stocking.

The service life I got out of the Campy 10-speed chains and cassette gears is rather pathetic...also IMNSHO. 1500 miles for a well cared for chain and maybe 5K on the cogs is just insane, considering the cost and the fact that the once one-time-per-season chain replacement has devolved into a 4 or 5 time per season maintenance job...not to mention the cost and stocking issue of keeping one or two laying in my spares box. Must be my awesome power output! /img/vbsmilies/smilies/biggrin.gif
 

Dr Lodge

Member
May 3, 2012
109
6
0
I've got a Japanese Car (Lexus RX300) and love it. But its Italian for the bike...I dont ride my car ;-)
 

alienator

Well-Known Member
Jun 10, 2004
12,596
310
0
Dr Lodge said:
I've got a Japanese Car (Lexus RX300) and love it. But its Italian for the bike...I dont ride my car ;-)
In terms of quality, it doesn't matter whether you're riding Japanese, Taiwanese, or Italian gruppos. Quality these days is excellent for all the big players. Hell, Team Exergy rides MicroShift, and it's unlikely you'll ever ride as hard or as much as they do, and MicroShift is the newest player in the game. All that matters is choosing a gruppo that pushes your happy buttons.
 

Pat Stowe

New Member
Jan 3, 2012
123
4
0
To those who complain about campy's cost, keep in mind they don't outsource manufacturing, such as poor villagers in Malaysia as Sh-----o does, Campy is made in Italy and their main busines is bike stuff not fishing reels.
 

CAMPYBOB

Well-Known Member
Sep 12, 2005
11,945
2,086
113
Uh...as much as love da Linguini components...

They outsourced chains to Rohloff in Germany (zee Germans, they make good stuff!) starting way back in the '80's.

After the infamous boat-anchor SGR clipless pedals (made in Italy by only slightly buzzed up Italians after a long vino and cheese break), Campy sub'ed pedals out to Look...in France, of all places. They might as well have went to...Chechnaya.

Some of their carbon work has gone to cheap labor in Romania, as has some contract CNC machining work.

The only failure of the 'new' Campy stuff I have had is a carbon Chorus seat post. The fracking aluminum clamp-to-carbon shaft glue joint failed 15 miles from home. Campy has discontinued the manufacture of seat posts. Pathetic! I've ridden Campy seat posts since 1972 and now the bastages don't even bother to make them...along with other fine items that set them apart from the Suntours, shimaNOs, Zeus, Triplex Sports, Simplex, Mavics. Modolos of the world.

I have threatened to boycott watching old Sophia Loren movie re-runs over this issue.

Someone needs to make a "****** finds out Campy outsourced work!" video.
 

alienator

Well-Known Member
Jun 10, 2004
12,596
310
0
Pat Stowe said:
To those who complain about campy's cost, keep in mind they don't outsource manufacturing, such as  poor villagers in Malaysia as Sh-----o does,  Campy is made in Italy and their main busines is bike stuff not fishing reels.  
Which part of Italy is Romania in?
 

CAMPYBOB

Well-Known Member
Sep 12, 2005
11,945
2,086
113
Which part of Italy is Romania in?

The ROMANIAN part! Duh!

The Eyetalians are always trying to kick the Roma out of their own little bit of fiscal paradise. They call the gypsies, tramps and thieves.
 

TestaDellaCorsa

New Member
Dec 16, 2012
1
0
0
After using Shimano 105, then Ultegra, and then finally debating whether or not to go to Dura Ace, I switched to Campagnolo back in 2003 when I ordered a Ciocc from Maestro.uk and never looked back. Honestly, beyond weight, and slightly crisper shifting, there's not much difference beyond cost between Super Record and Chorus. May non upper-level pro Euro teams run Chorus on their training bikes and some riders don't seem to mind one iota. I got tired of not being able to order smaller internal parts (thanks Shimano for making users purchase an entire STI shifter instead of fixing/replacing a small working part). The finish is better. The quality is better. It lasts longer than the Shimano and there are very few recalls and issues with it. Yes, there is a breaking in period for the rider to get used to it, but I'm about to switch out my SRAM (hate the shifting feel of it) for a Campagnolo XX and run that since I - and most of our riders - are more than happy with the reliability of Campagnolo. Yes, it costs money, but hiqh quality goods often do cost more. Will I buy and eventually sell Super Record electronic gruppose? I will test the groupset, but I prefer the reliability of mechanical shifting versus facing a potential dilemma with electronic shifting/power source/battery failure, et al. It's nice to swing your leg over the bike and ride, which is what most everybody, regardless of their gruppo choice, is all about doing anyway! Enjoy your build and the ride.
 

Pierre Pouliot

New Member
Oct 18, 2013
1
0
0
I am a confirmed Campy user. I own 12 bikes since 1972 and all of them have Campagnolo installed on them. The product is reliable, easy to use and most of all, can easily be repaired should you need to due to usage or a crash. Recently, I purchased a monocoque carbon frame and installed Campy Record 11 speed. The shifting is amazing, it's fast and responsive, requires little or no adjustments, and best of all required no connection for the battery charger. Super Record has too much titanium in it and is prone to more wear than hardened steel as in the Record. The Record version is plenty light since it brings my bike just inside of 14 lbs. I also have Campy Record,Chorus, Veloce and Centaur on other bikes. The Record version is by far the best. I ride 5000+ km per season and participate in senior category races. Campy is worth every penny.
 

CAMPYBOB

Well-Known Member
Sep 12, 2005
11,945
2,086
113
"I own 12 bikes since 1972 and all of them have Campagnolo installed on them."

I'm CampyBob and I approve of this post!

I also started in 1972.


"Super Record has too much titanium in it and is prone to more wear than hardened steel as in the Record."

I killed a Record cassette (inner two or three gears were Ti) in under 1000 miles. Ti is too soft for daily use, but it does save a few grams.


"Campy is worth every penny."

Indeed! Life is too short to be seen riding shimaNO! Just for the hell of it I would like to put a season in on SRAM Force/Red/Black/whatever.
 

spdntrxi

New Member
Aug 17, 2013
20
0
0
using circa 2010 SR11 on mine... one day I will go SR11 EPS

Chorus cassette though..
 

CAMPYBOB

Well-Known Member
Sep 12, 2005
11,945
2,086
113
"one day I will go SR11 EPS"

Oh yes! It shall be ours!

"Chorus cassette though.."

The intelligent choice, for sure. If you live in steep hills and use those inner cogs often and under load, that Ti will melt away like butter. Save the Record and Super Record cluster for those hilly races.
 

southparkboy4u

New Member
Jul 31, 2013
12
0
0
I have used Campy Record for the last six years. My previous bike was Campy also. The only Campy part I would not purchase is the Record CF front derailleur with the carbon fiber face plate. I brought my bike down to Wheat Ridge Cyclery, the shop owned by Ron Kiefel, one of the truly nice people in Colorado cycling. One of his mechanics diagnosed the reason there was a little hiccup in the shifting. The CF faceplate breaks at the junction with the metal cage. The mechanic then brought out a box half full of Campy Record front derailleurs, broken usually in the front. The mechanic put on a Centaur front derailleur, which has performed perfectly. Where's a fee contingent trail lawyer when you need one?