Apple Butter?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Greykits, Feb 6, 2004.

  1. Greykits

    Greykits Guest

    I recently made this:

    Caramel Apple Dip

    1 pkg 8oz cream cheese
    1/2 cup apple butter*
    2/4 cup brown sugar
    3/2 ts vanilla
    4/2 cup peanuts, chopped Apples

    Place all ingredients except peanuts and apples in a bowl. Mix until smooth. Stir in chopped
    peanuts. Chill. Just before serving, sliceapples, arrange around.

    This was good with tart apples, but better the second day after 1 minute in the microwave. Also,
    the second day we had some chopped peanuts on the side and dipped the apples into the dip, then
    the peanuts.

    Now I have a big old jar of apple butter. We used to have this in the fridge while I was growing up
    and the only way I ever had it was spread on bread. Is there any other use or recipe for it?

    rharps.com
     
    Tags:


  2. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    Greykits wrote:
    > I recently made this:
    (snipped)
    > Now I have a big old jar of apple butter. We used to have this in the fridge while I was growing
    > up and the only way I ever had it was spread on bread. Is there any other use or recipe for it?
    >
    Crock Pot Ribs!

    4 lbs. country (meaty) pork ribs 1 medium onion, chopped 1 c. firmly packed light brown sugar 1 c.
    apple butter 1 c. ketchup
    1/2 c. lemon juice
    2/2 c. orange juice 1 Tbs. A-1 Steak sauce 1 Tbs. Tabasco sauce 1 tsp. ground black pepper

    Trim the fat off the ribs; sprinkle lightly with salt. Stir together remaining ingredients to make
    sauce. Pour half the mixture into a five quart slow cooker. Place the ribs in a crock pot and pour
    the remaining sauce over the top. Cover and cook on HIGH about 6 hours. They will be nicely glazed.
    Sweet and spicy.

    Jill
     
  3. In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Greykits) wrote:

    > Now I have a big old jar of apple butter. We used to have this in the fridge while I was growing
    > up and the only way I ever had it was spread on bread. Is there any other use or recipe for it?
    >
    >
    > rharps.com

    It's a nice condiment with pork or poultry. Spread it on pancakes instead of syrup.
    --
    -Barb, <www.jamlady.eboard.com> updated 1-31-04 A good friend will come and bail you out of jail; a
    true friend will be sitting next to you saying, "Damn,that was fun!"
     
  4. Nexis

    Nexis Guest

    "Greykits" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:20040206212717.21768[email protected]...
    > I recently made this:
    >
    > Caramel Apple Dip
    >
    > 1 pkg 8oz cream cheese
    > 1/2 cup apple butter*
    > 1/4 cup brown sugar
    > 1/2 ts vanilla
    > 1/2 cup peanuts, chopped Apples
    >
    > Place all ingredients except peanuts and apples in a bowl. Mix until
    smooth.
    > Stir in chopped peanuts. Chill. Just before serving, sliceapples,
    arrange
    > around.
    >
    > This was good with tart apples, but better the second day after 1 minute
    in the
    > microwave. Also, the second day we had some chopped peanuts on the side
    and
    > dipped the apples into the dip, then the peanuts.
    >
    > Now I have a big old jar of apple butter. We used to have this in the
    fridge
    > while I was growing up and the only way I ever had it was spread on bread.
    Is
    > there any other use or recipe for it?
    >
    >
    > rharps.com

    When I was a kid, my grandma would make a sort of turnover with applebutter for the filling. It was
    a puff pastry type of dough, very flaky and so good with the apple butter and she drizzled it with a
    caramel glaze...not too much, just a few thin stripes across the top. Very yummy on a Sunday morning
    with a cup of tea. I still love it on biscuits and fresh bread, though.

    kimberly
     
  5. Greykits

    Greykits Guest

    >Crock Pot Ribs!
    >
    >4 lbs. country (meaty) pork ribs 1 medium onion, chopped 1 c. firmly packed light brown sugar 1 c.
    >apple butter 1 c. ketchup
    >1/2 c. lemon juice
    >1/2 c. orange juice 1 Tbs. A-1 Steak sauce 1 Tbs. Tabasco sauce 1 tsp. ground black pepper
    >
    >Trim the fat off the ribs; sprinkle lightly with salt. Stir together remaining ingredients to make
    >sauce. Pour half the mixture into a five quart slow cooker. Place the ribs in a crock pot and pour
    >the remaining sauce over the top. Cover and cook on HIGH about 6 hours. They will be nicely glazed.
    >Sweet and spicy.
    >
    >Jill
    >
    You know, I had never considered it in a bbq-type sauce. Thank you! rharps.com
     
  6. Greykits

    Greykits Guest

    >It's a nice condiment with pork or poultry. Spread it on pancakes instead of syrup.

    So I could use it as a sort of a chutney? There may be some pancakes in my near future so I
    will try it.

    So, I can't put it into pierogies, not that I'd ever make them......

    >-Barb, <www.jamlady.eboard.com> updated 1-31-04 A good friend will come and bail you out of jail; a
    >true friend will be sitting next to you saying, "Damn,that was fun!"
    >
    >
    >
    rharps.com
     
  7. Greykits

    Greykits Guest

    >When I was a kid, my grandma would make a sort of turnover with applebutter for the filling. It was
    >a puff pastry type of dough, very flaky and so good with the apple butter and she drizzled it with
    >a caramel glaze...not too much, just a few thin stripes across the top. Very yummy on a Sunday
    >morning with a cup of tea. I still love it on biscuits and fresh bread, though.
    >
    >kimberly
    >
    That sounds really good! Maybe I could put a few apple slices in there, too.

    Grandmas always made the best food, better than mommy. I don't recall any desserts Grandma made,
    but she made a good beet soup and a meatloaf. She also had odd things in her house like
    pomegranates, coconuts, avocadoes and pineapples. My dad used to like to cook a few specialties
    every now and then. I can say this about three of her grandkids: we appreciate good food, haute or
    hot, we like it.

    rharps.com
     
  8. Penmart01

    Penmart01 Guest

    >(Greykits) writes:
    >
    >>It's a nice condiment with pork or poultry. Spread it on pancakes instead of syrup.
    >
    >So I could use it as a sort of a chutney? There may be some pancakes in my near future so I
    >will try it.
    >
    >So, I can't put it into pierogies,

    Apple butter goes great with Barb's beet 'n meat filled pierogies... nice and sweet.. I'm sure
    she'll give us her recipe. hehe

    ---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =--- ---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =--- Sheldon
    ```````````` "Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
     
  9. Penmart01

    Penmart01 Guest

    >(Greykits) writes:
    >
    >Grandmas always made the best food, better than mommy. I don't recall any desserts Grandma made,
    >but she made a good beet soup and a meatloaf.

    Oh, two of my very favorites... you wouldn't happen to have the recipes, or at least
    extrapolations thereof.

    ---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =--- ---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =--- Sheldon
    ```````````` "Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
     
  10. Greykits

    Greykits Guest

    >Apple butter goes great with Barb's beet 'n meat filled pierogies... nice and sweet.. I'm sure
    >she'll give us her recipe. hehe
    >

    Hehe. Unlike Barb, I like beets!

    rharps.com
     
  11. Greykits

    Greykits Guest

    >(PENMART01)
    >Date: 2/7/2004 6:54 PM Mountain Standard Time
    >Message-id: <[email protected]>
    >
    >>(Greykits) writes:
    >>
    >>Grandmas always made the best food, better than mommy. I don't recall any desserts Grandma made,
    >>but she made a good beet soup and a meatloaf.
    >
    >Oh, two of my very favorites... you wouldn't happen to have the recipes, or at least
    >extrapolations thereof.
    >
    Grandma was born in Lithuania in 1893. She came from frugal peasant stock, so she didn't waste
    anything. She never had me help her cook. It was just when I visited, she'd say, have some of this.
    Her meatloaf had grated vegetables in it, so it was moist and flavorful. I've come close using
    grated carrots and potatoes.

    As for what she called beet soup, it was always pink in color. From what I can tell,
    Lithuanians don't tend to use meat stock to cook beet soup. Here is a very good site on the
    culture with recipes:

    http://ausis.gf.vu.lt/eka/EWG/ewgtitulinis.htm

    Nothing is better than left-over kugeli sliced and fried in butter!

    >
    >---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =--- ---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =--- Sheldon
    >```````````` "Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
    >
    >
    >
    rharps.com
     
  12. In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Greykits) wrote:

    > >It's a nice condiment with pork or poultry. Spread it on pancakes instead of syrup.
    >
    > So I could use it as a sort of a chutney? There may be some pancakes in my near future so I
    > will try it.

    > So, I can't put it into pierogies, not that I'd ever make them......

    I don't know about the pierogi, Karen--the only fruit filling from my history is prunes, either
    whole or mashed. As far as 'a sort of chutney', I'm not sure what that means. I use my favorite
    fruit butters as an accompaniment with some meats, pork and poultry being favorites. I might stab a
    bite of meat to the fork and then dip it into the glob of butter on the plate, or first get some
    butter on the fork and then proceed to the meat bit. Your call. I'm thinking that a layer of apple
    butter between two layers of spice cake wouldn't be the worst thing in the world, either.
    --
    -Barb, <www.jamlady.eboard.com> updated 1-31-04 A good friend will come and bail you out of jail; a
    true friend will be sitting next to you saying, "Damn,that was fun!"
     
  13. Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    > (Greykits) wrote:
    >
    >
    >>>It's a nice condiment with pork or poultry. Spread it on pancakes instead of syrup.
    >>
    >>So I could use it as a sort of a chutney? There may be some pancakes in my near future so I
    >>will try it.
    >
    >
    >>So, I can't put it into pierogies, not that I'd ever make them......
    >
    >
    > I don't know about the pierogi, Karen--the only fruit filling from my history is prunes, either
    > whole or mashed. As far as 'a sort of chutney', I'm not sure what that means. I use my favorite
    > fruit butters as an accompaniment with some meats, pork and poultry being favorites. I might stab
    > a bite of meat to the fork and then dip it into the glob of butter on the plate, or first get some
    > butter on the fork and then proceed to the meat bit. Your call. I'm thinking that a layer of apple
    > butter between two layers of spice cake wouldn't be the worst thing in the world, either.

    The only way to eat Barbara's Apple Butter is on a piece of fresh baguette, not sour bread, rye
    bread or any other kind that is strongly flavored, so that not an iota of the wonderful taste of the
    spread is wasted. How can you put it on meat or poultry? It may enhance the taste of whatever you
    mean to accompany, but you don't get the whole impact of the wonderful flavor. But than, there is
    her Apricot Butter. I have to stop writing about that, lest I go and finish the last bit I have.
    This is something you have to taste to believe. Like eating the ripest and most flavorful apricots
    right off the tree.
     
  14. Penmart01

    Penmart01 Guest

    (Greykits) writes:
    >
    >>(PENMART01) wrote:
    >>
    >>>(Greykits) writes:
    >>>
    >>>Grandmas always made the best food, better than mommy. I don't recall any desserts Grandma made,
    >>>but she made a good beet soup and a meatloaf.
    >>
    >>Oh, two of my very favorites... you wouldn't happen to have the recipes, or at least
    >>extrapolations thereof.
    >>
    >Grandma was born in Lithuania in 1893. She came from frugal peasant stock, so she didn't waste
    >anything. She never had me help her cook. It was just when I visited, she'd say, have some of this.
    >Her meatloaf had grated vegetables in it, so it was moist and flavorful. I've come close using
    >grated carrots and potatoes.
    >
    >As for what she called beet soup, it was always pink in color. From what I can tell,
    >Lithuanians don't tend to use meat stock to cook beet soup. Here is a very good site on the
    >culture with recipes:
    >
    >http://ausis.gf.vu.lt/eka/EWG/ewgtitulinis.htm
    >
    >Nothing is better than left-over kugeli sliced and fried in butter!

    My grand parents were born in Latvia... as was my father, in Riga, my mother in Baltimore, MD...
    food and traditions are the same. Wonderful breads... my grandmother would knead the dough right
    after the dinner dishes were put away, wrap it in floured linen and tuck the great balls of dough
    into their bed... before sun-up she'd be in the kitchen baking the bread and preparing a huge
    breakfast; soft boiled eggs, homemade jams and fruit compote, farmer/pot cheese, butter, a variety
    of herrings, thick slabs of heavenly bread, coffee, babka, and healthy glasses schnapps of course...
    medicinal, for digestion. There was never any meat for breakfast, only the herrings. My grandmother
    had no Kitchen Aid, only her hands, as it should be to make real bread. My grandmother always
    smelled of yeast... yoose can keep those freedom parfumes on those anorexic haricot verts... give me
    heaving womanly cleavage scented with a dusting of Fleishman's. Thanks for the URL.

    ---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =--- ---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =--- Sheldon
    ```````````` "Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
     
  15. Greykits

    Greykits Guest

    >(Greykits) writes:
    >>
    >>>(PENMART01) wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>(Greykits) writes:
    >>>>
    >>>>Grandmas always made the best food, better than mommy. I don't recall any desserts Grandma made,
    >>>>but she made a good beet soup and a meatloaf.
    >>>
    >>>Oh, two of my very favorites... you wouldn't happen to have the recipes, or at least
    >>>extrapolations thereof.
    >>>
    >>Grandma was born in Lithuania in 1893. She came from frugal peasant stock, so she didn't waste
    >>anything. She never had me help her cook. It was just
    >when
    >>I visited, she'd say, have some of this. Her meatloaf had grated vegetables
    >in
    >>it, so it was moist and flavorful. I've come close using grated carrots and potatoes.
    >>
    >>As for what she called beet soup, it was always pink in color. From what I can tell, Lithuanians
    >>don't tend to use meat stock to cook beet soup. Here is a very good site on the culture with
    >>recipes:
    >>
    >>http://ausis.gf.vu.lt/eka/EWG/ewgtitulinis.htm
    >>
    >>Nothing is better than left-over kugeli sliced and fried in butter!
    >
    >My grand parents were born in Latvia... as was my father, in Riga, my mother in Baltimore, MD...
    >food and traditions are the same. Wonderful breads... my grandmother would knead the dough right
    >after the dinner dishes were put away, wrap it in floured linen and tuck the great balls of dough
    >into their bed... before sun-up she'd be in the kitchen baking the bread and preparing a huge
    >breakfast; soft boiled eggs, homemade jams and fruit compote, farmer/pot cheese, butter, a variety
    >of herrings, thick slabs of heavenly bread, coffee, babka, and healthy glasses schnapps of
    >course... medicinal, for digestion. There was never any meat for breakfast, only the herrings. My
    >grandmother had no Kitchen Aid, only her hands, as it should be to make real bread. My grandmother
    >always smelled of yeast... yoose can keep those freedom parfumes on those anorexic haricot verts...
    >give me heaving womanly cleavage scented with a dusting of Fleishman's. Thanks for the URL.
    You are welcome!

    I have so many fond memories of my little Lithuanian grandma, the only grandparent I ever got to
    meet. She was a tough woman, having raised 4 kids through the Depression by herself - the other kids
    died. She told me that she stopped crying forever when she had to sew the shroud for one of her
    children. She retired from her job as a charwoman at the Penobscot Building in Detroit when she was
    75. What more can I say about her? As her youngest grandchild I was blessed.

    As for her kugeli, she would grate potatoes and let them drain - and then match that amount with
    milk. I'm not sure whether she fried her bacon before, but about half a pound of bacon went into
    this dish. A whole onion was grated and put in. An egg or two were put in and this would bake for
    some time. This is a very good dish!

    ---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =---
    > ---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =--- Sheldon ```````````` "Life would be devoid of all
    > meaning were it without tribulation."
    >

    rharps.com
     
  16. Penmart01

    Penmart01 Guest

    >As for her kugeli, she would grate potatoes and let them drain - and then match that amount with
    >milk. I'm not sure whether she fried her bacon before, but about half a pound of bacon went into
    >this dish. A whole onion was grated and put in. An egg or two were put in and this would bake for
    >some time. This is a very good dish!

    Sounds similar...

    = Potatonik =

    Sponge 1 cup warm water 1 1/2 packages active dry yeast (scant 1 1/2 Tbls) 1 1/2 cups bread flour or
    unbleached all-purpose flour

    Dough
    3/4 pound potatoes (about 1 1/2 medium potatoes) skins on 6 ounces yellow onions (1 1/4 medium
    onions), ground or grated 1 small stale roll or 2 slices old bread (torn or crumbs)
    4/2 cup bread flour or unbleached all-purpose flour 1 1/2 tsps salt Scant 1/2 tsp baking powder
    5/4 tsp freshly ground black pepper, or more to taste
    6/2 cup vegetable oil
    7/2 cup lightly beaten egg Shortening for greasing pans

    Sponge In a large bowl sprinkle yeast over the warm water; stir to dissolve. Add the flour and mix
    until smooth. Cover and set aside until it puffs up (15 to 20 minutes).

    Dough Stir down the sponge. Scrub the potatoes, then grind or grate them with the skins on. Add the
    ground potatoes and onion to the Sponge and stir until blended. Add the stale roll, flour, salt,
    baking powder, and ground pepper; mix until incorporated. Add the oil and egg and mix well. Drop the
    mixture out into 3 well-greased 8-or 9-inch loaf pans. Each loaf should weigh about 15 ounces. Leave
    room for expansion -- the potatonik will rise in the oven.

    Baking Bake with steam in a preheated 360 F oven until the crust is brown and feels firm when
    pressed in the center with your fingertips (about 1 hour). Let cool on a wire rack covered with a
    cloth for 5 minutes to allow the loaves to steam. Invert and tap out onto the rack. Serve warm.
    Potatonik can be frozen for 1 to 2 weeks. Reheat at 325 F until warm -- can also be reheated for 35-
    45 minutes to develop a hard crust.

    Steam To produce steam place a roasting pan half filled with boiling water on bottom of oven at the
    onset of baking -- use caution opening oven -- steam burns are dangerous and very painful.

    Yield Makes 3 loaves
    ---

    ---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =--- ---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =--- Sheldon
    ```````````` "Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
     
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