Applying too much lube to the chain



sergen

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Jul 28, 2003
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Gave my bike a good clean all over this afternoon. After removing the dirt from it I then lubed the chain. Only problem is that I now realise (having used this forum's search function 5 hours too late!) that I put far too much lube on the chain, rear cassette and chainring. Rather than carefully putting a drop on each link I more or less just sprayed it all over.

at the time I didn't realise that too much could be too bad due to the lube picking up dust.

The bike is back in my shed for the night now. But I want to get straight back on it tomorrow morning. Would the best thing to do simply be to get a dry rag and wipe it all over the chain to remove the excess?

By the way, what is the proper method for lubing the cassette and the chainring. Do you squirt lube directly onto the space between the sprockets and apply it onto the teeth of the chainring?

Many thanks
 

Fradbut

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Feb 26, 2004
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This how I look after my chain - Wash all the lube & dirt off with hot soap & water. Dry the chain, cassette, chain rings. Apply an oil chain lube sparingly to the chain. Run the chain through all of the cassette and both rings to lube. To clean in the future after every ride clean cassette, chain & rings with clean dry cloth untill clean then re-apply lube as before. Only re-wash the chain with soap & water if it gets very muddy after a ride. Never use solvents or spirits to clean the chain. Don't overlube !
 

frenchyge

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Apr 3, 2005
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sergen said:
Would the best thing to do simply be to get a dry rag and wipe it all over the chain to remove the excess?
Yes. Depending on the lube you used, that might be one of the instruction steps listed on the bottle.
 

leestevens

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Dec 15, 2004
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sergen said:
Gave my bike a good clean all over this afternoon. After removing the dirt from it I then lubed the chain. Only problem is that I now realise (having used this forum's search function 5 hours too late!) that I put far too much lube on the chain, rear cassette and chainring. Rather than carefully putting a drop on each link I more or less just sprayed it all over.

at the time I didn't realise that too much could be too bad due to the lube picking up dust.

The bike is back in my shed for the night now. But I want to get straight back on it tomorrow morning. Would the best thing to do simply be to get a dry rag and wipe it all over the chain to remove the excess?

By the way, what is the proper method for lubing the cassette and the chainring. Do you squirt lube directly onto the space between the sprockets and apply it onto the teeth of the chainring?

Many thanks
It can be a good thing to overlube aswell as it flushes dirt out from under the rollers. Leave the chain overnight and run a rag over it in the morning and it should be good. the chainrings and cassette are lubed by the chain, they shouldn't need a seperate lubing.:)
 

Sprint2Win

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Oct 31, 2004
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Wipe the overlube off with a rag while spinning the crank backwards.
The cassette and chainrings will take care of themselves, if the chain is properly lubed.
 

531Aussie

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Apr 11, 2004
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I've tired heaps of bike lubes and I don't like any of them because they're too thick and attract too much gunk.

I buy 'all-purpose' or 'sewing machine' oil from the supermarket because it's much thinner and cost 2 bucks a tube.
 

frenchyge

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Apr 3, 2005
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531Aussie said:
I buy 'all-purpose' or 'sewing machine' oil from the supermarket because it's much thinner and cost 2 bucks a tube.
Agree. The Road Rage lube that the bike store recommended looks suspiciously like my can of 3-in-1 oil that I had around the house. ;)
 

531Aussie

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Apr 11, 2004
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frenchyge said:
Agree. The Road Rage lube that the bike store recommended looks suspiciously like my can of 3-in-1 oil that I had around the house. ;)
yeah :)

the bike lube is a bit expensive, too: about $7.50 US (~10 bucks AUS) down here for something 'good' like Finsh Line

And when it comes down to it, it's not crucial because chains and cassettes are fast-wearing, anyway. If I AM using the wrong stuff, my chain might last 8 months instead of 9.
 

Doctor Morbius

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Mar 15, 2004
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frenchyge said:
Agree. The Road Rage lube that the bike store recommended looks suspiciously like my can of 3-in-1 oil that I had around the house. ;)
Ahhhhh, the ol' 3in1. My chain lube of choice. I used to use more expensive lubes, including Boeshiled T-9, but am now using 3in1. It's cheap, it doesn't attract much grit and it works as well as other lubes I've tried. Oh yeah, and it's cheap! Check the pic to see how clean my chain stays using 3in1. That's pretty much normal.


Also, I started using marine grease on hubs and bottom brackets at the recommendation of bourdeaux. It works as well as the expensive grease too. He really knew his ****.
 

gclark8

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Apr 13, 2004
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Parker-Hale Gun Oil, if you get caught out with a lady, it makes a nice after-shave. :cool:

I also like the Dow-Corning Wheel Bearing grease BR-2, the one for boat trailers, for hubs and BBs.
 

domaindomain

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Dec 20, 2004
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Have a look at a proper chain cleaner too. Barbieri make a couple that come with cleaning fluid and lube - here is one of them - and you can clean and lube a chain in a couple of minutes and keep your hands clean!

I like the GT85 spray for chains.
 

Doctor Morbius

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Mar 15, 2004
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domaindomain said:
... and you can clean and lube a chain in a couple of minutes and keep your hands clean!
I'm one of those dorks that uses latex gloves when cleaning my chains!
 

Doctor Morbius

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Hoya1500 said:
Does that mean you're not supposed to use a degreaser? Does soap and water really cut it?
Simple Green works fine in all but the worst cases. If it's really bad then use something like Gunk engine degreaser. The secret is not to let it get that bad in the first place. Every few days you could pump a couple of sprays of Simple Green onto a rag and wipe the chain off. Doing this routinely gives a chain that sparkling goodness.
 

dhk

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Sep 1, 2003
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Doctor Morbius said:
Simple Green works fine in all but the worst cases. If it's really bad then use something like Gunk engine degreaser. The secret is not to let it get that bad in the first place. Every few days you could pump a couple of sprays of Simple Green onto a rag and wipe the chain off. Doing this routinely gives a chain that sparkling goodness.
We've all got different rituals when it comes to chain care. Personally, I don't use solvents on the chain, and believe frequent cleaning unnecessary. My chain gets a relube every 100 miles, then a quick wipe with a rag after a day or two. Believe applying the new lube, one drop per bushing, causes the old lube to flow out the sideplates just fine. Further cleaning may make the chain shiny, but don't see why that's important to function or life of the chain.

I'll use the cleaner machine and detergent solution a couple of times a year, mostly before a big ride when I want everything to look shiny. Have on rare occasions removed the cassette to clean the cogs and spacers before a big event, but it's just for looks....when you know other guys will be showing up with everything shiny.
 

mitosis

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Jun 21, 2004
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sergen said:
Gave my bike a good clean all over this afternoon. After removing the dirt from it I then lubed the chain. Only problem is that I now realise (having used this forum's search function 5 hours too late!) that I put far too much lube on the chain, rear cassette and chainring. Rather than carefully putting a drop on each link I more or less just sprayed it all over.

at the time I didn't realise that too much could be too bad due to the lube picking up dust.

The bike is back in my shed for the night now. But I want to get straight back on it tomorrow morning. Would the best thing to do simply be to get a dry rag and wipe it all over the chain to remove the excess?

By the way, what is the proper method for lubing the cassette and the chainring. Do you squirt lube directly onto the space between the sprockets and apply it onto the teeth of the chainring?

Many thanks

Wipe off the excess with a soft rag.

You can lube the chain putting one drop on each link if you have the patience. If your chain is completey dry after cleaning, run it through the midddle sprocket of the cluster and the big chain ring and apply lube while turning the pedals backwards until the chain is lightly moistened (a bit like foreplay really).

If you are using a spray hang a rag behind the chain to keep spray off the wheels and frame (use the thin tube that comes with the spray can to minimise drift).

Keep turning the pedals for a minute or so to allow the lube to penetrate then wipe the excess off the outside of the chain by holding a soft cloth to the face plates of the chain while you turn the pedals backwards.

Leave it for a few hours for any solvent to evaporate then wipe the chain ring adn rear derailleur gears while turning the pedals backwards.

The chain rings and rear cluster will be lubricated as you ride
 

Hoya1500

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Jul 17, 2005
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Doctor Morbius said:
Simple Green works fine in all but the worst cases. If it's really bad then use something like Gunk engine degreaser. The secret is not to let it get that bad in the first place. Every few days you could pump a couple of sprays of Simple Green onto a rag and wipe the chain off. Doing this routinely gives a chain that sparkling goodness.
How does engine degreaser affect your chain? (guess i won't be using that stuff anymore)
 

Doctor Morbius

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Mar 15, 2004
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dhk said:
We've all got different rituals when it comes to chain care. Personally, I don't use solvents on the chain, and believe frequent cleaning unnecessary. My chain gets a relube every 100 miles, then a quick wipe with a rag after a day or two. Believe applying the new lube, one drop per bushing, causes the old lube to flow out the sideplates just fine. Further cleaning may make the chain shiny, but don't see why that's important to function or life of the chain.

I'll use the cleaner machine and detergent solution a couple of times a year, mostly before a big ride when I want everything to look shiny. Have on rare occasions removed the cassette to clean the cogs and spacers before a big event, but it's just for looks....when you know other guys will be showing up with everything shiny.
I agree with you. But some people don't do as much and as a result of lax cleaning/maintenance policies they'll have grease and grit caked on the chain. Someone we once knew might have called them "nose pickers". Under those circumstances they will probably need a heavy duty degreaser and a full monty "Sheldon Brown" styled chain cleaning.
 

Doctor Morbius

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Hoya1500 said:
How does engine degreaser affect your chain? (guess i won't be using that stuff anymore)
It's not going to hurt it. It's just that if you keep your chain on the clean side it is overkill. If you are going to use engine degreaser you may want to remove the chain from the bike though as it may schmutz up your paint. It's pretty caustic.
 

FasterthanU

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Jun 29, 2004
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Don't use engine degreaser! Unaffective in this sort of application. Buy any kind of Bio-degreaser found at your local auto shop. Engine degreaser is basically just gas and is considerably ineffective and abrasive/bad smelling. It's also bad for the environment. Bio-degreaser! -FTU
 

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