Are bell nomorflats any good?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by RetFor, Apr 11, 2018.

  1. RetFor

    RetFor New Member

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    hey guys. Ive got a an ebike that i use for getting around. the past two days were hell, though. long story, short version: recurring flat from shot tire and had to walk it a lot. while looking on amazon for backup tube i came across the nomorflats, and im thinking something like these would be a great option, or something similar if theres a better option. while some said it made the bike heavier, that wouldnt be much issue on an ebike as im not pedaling anyway, usually. might get a bit less distance out of it, but that shouldnt be too big a difference. two concerns tho:

    changing the tires. it seems theyre hard to get off. anyone know just how hard? the ebike seems to wear through tread faster than my regular bikes have, so even with this, ill still have to change the tire every 6 months or so.

    the bigger concern is fit. my tires are currently 26 x 1.95. the nomorflats is rated for 1.75 to 1.95, but looking at the reviews it seems it wont be a good fit for a 1.95 as someone said they had to put some spaces for their bike which was that size. i dont want to have to deal with that tho. i guessing i could just get a 1.75 tire, though? or would the difference be enough that it wont fit my rims properly?

    thanks.
     
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  2. dabac

    dabac Well-Known Member

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    Foam tubes are pretty much an impossible compromise.
    With a clincher tire on a regular rim, you need to get the bead into the deepest, center cavity of the tire to to free up enough material to get the last of the bead of over the edge.
    Not a problem with inflatable tube.
    But with a foam tube already filling out the tire you have two options:
    1) use a foam tube soft enough to make it easy to pull the bead in under the tube, and suffer HUGE rolling resistance
    2) use a foam tube firm enough to give a decent ride, and pull and heave like crazy to get the bead onto the rim.
    Heck, even solid/airless tires work better than the filled tubes. Check out Tannus.
    If you don’t have to pedal your bicycle at all, it’s not a bicycle any more. Depending on local laws and engine power, it might be seen as anything from a scooter to an unlicenced motorbike.
     
  3. RetFor

    RetFor New Member

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    so the nomorflats are foam? the description doesnt specify.

    the tannus looks good in terms of puncture-proofness, but they look pretty smooth. any idea how they are on grip? id be worried about slipping. theyre also a lot more expensive...

    the tires my bike came with are 1.95. can i switch to a 1.75 without problems while keeping the same rims? i know for a drastic change id need new rims, but would that small change be ok?

    thanks.
     
  4. dabac

    dabac Well-Known Member

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    Yes, the nomorflats are foam. Like circular pool noodles.
    I haven’t tried Tannus, but I’ve used the same technology tires from Greentyre. A little squirrelly when crossing lane markers or cobbles, otherwise fine WRT traction.
    I don’t know your rim width, but 1.75 is most likely perfectly fine.
     
  5. Verve2

    Verve2 New Member

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    If they make them to fit your bike my understanding is that Schwalbe Marathon Plus are the closest to a puncture-proof tire there is. I have them on my Giant Cypress DX and they roll fine. You may run across complaints that they're hard to put on but I found them to be no problem at all.
     
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