Are entry leve bikes worth putting more money into.



oroden01

New Member
Jul 28, 2006
5
0
0
36
So here is the deal, i am 6'3" and 178lbs. i just finished my bike messengering job and ready to start using a real bike to use for serious rides, not that riding a fixed gear was anything but fun. i looked at all of the entry model bikes, the trek 1000 and all of those, the cheapest one i found was the Scott s60 for 550. lets say i did buy this s60. is a bike like this upgradeable? is it worth it to put more money into a bike like this, for components, better wheels and so forth?
thanks,
Omri
 

BUTCHBIKER

New Member
Jul 15, 2006
7
0
0
Yer i would like to know the answer to that too. Good question.......but will we ever know the answer???
 

ishiwata

New Member
Jul 25, 2003
99
0
0
oroden01 said:
So here is the deal, i am 6'3" and 178lbs. i just finished my bike messengering job and ready to start using a real bike to use for serious rides, not that riding a fixed gear was anything but fun. i looked at all of the entry model bikes, the trek 1000 and all of those, the cheapest one i found was the Scott s60 for 550. lets say i did buy this s60. is a bike like this upgradeable? is it worth it to put more money into a bike like this, for components, better wheels and so forth?
thanks,
Omri

buying bike parts a la carte to do upgrades is the most expensive way to build a bike. with that said, i've done it repeatedly and will continue to do so. whether it's "worth it" is really a personal decision. I wouldn't upgrade every part on a $550 bike, but I might buy a nice set of wheels, a good saddle, and good pedals. I would only upgrade the drivetrain components if they break or cause problems.
 

Albert 50

New Member
Apr 18, 2006
1,088
0
0
BUTCHBIKER said:
Yer i would like to know the answer to that too. Good question.......but will we ever know the answer???
There probably is not a single answer to this Q but I will offer a few options:-
1) If you are a dead set new cyclist, beg, borrow or steal [well don't steal] a bike & prove to yourself you will actually ride it regularly enough to warrant the purchase. You may also consider an Xmart <$100 job for that same reason. I see plenty of boats for eg in back yards, with weeds growing around the trailer & apparently not used. This could end up being your 1000$+ bike if you don't stick to riding.
2) Buy an entry level & wear out "bits" before replacing anything. This option will not give you a good frame though.
3) If you opt to go "boots & all" then the most cost effective way would be to spend as much money as you can reasonably afford, on the style of bike you need, which may invariably have better drive train [at least in part], tyres, wheels, saddle, bars, brakes etc with a lighter frame than a cheap bike. Most makers usually upgrade components progressively, including having higher gearing [for stronger riders] as the prices go up. To buy & then upgrade before parts wear out is a very poor option. Even tyres & chains, which are usually the first components to be replaced due to wear should be well worn before replacing/upgrading