Are there any parts heavier riders should not use?



Meek One

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May 5, 2004
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Are there any parts heavier riders should not use? I am looking to get a road bike and want to be informed. I am not super heavy, but still am about 215 (97kg) and don't want to snap anything designed for a 130 lbs guy. Eg I just read that Ti spindles in pedals is a bad idea. T or F? What would be a good frame material? Thanks in advance.
 

lokstah

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Sep 30, 2003
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Meek One said:
Are there any parts heavier riders should not use? I am looking to get a road bike and want to be informed. I am not super heavy, but still am about 215 (97kg) and don't want to snap anything designed for a 130 lbs guy. Eg I just read that Ti spindles in pedals is a bad idea. T or F? What would be a good frame material? Thanks in advance.
Unfortunately, unless you're a structural engineer or an employee of the company which manufactures the part, you're unlikely to be able to figure out precise answers to your question -- luckily, there are some rules of thumb to abide by.

Firstly, some components offer rider weight limits. It's always a good idea to be on the lookout for those, if you're concerned about your heft. Typical parts categories sporting weight limits include frames, wheelsets, and pedals. Be sharp, and don't hesitate to ask shop folks, or the companies directly.

Beyond that, some common sense is required. Material choice is a deceptive indicator -- there's hefty carbon fiber, and there's ultra thin-walled aluminum -- so use your head. I'd steer away from most components designed to be both weight-bearing and ultralight. Ti-spindled pedals, for instance, wouldn't be suspect simply because they're Ti-spindled; the problem is that a manufacturer using Ti in that fashion is likely trying to create a superlight unit.

In other words, gram count, but in reverse. Avoid 200g handlebars and 150g seatposts. Steer clear of 16lbs frames. The more research you do, the more accurate a picture you're likely to get regarding a particular parts' durability under stress; when in doubt, though, look for labels with reputations for good quality, and resist the trend towards featherweight numbers.

Good luck!
 

gruppo

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Aug 14, 2004
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Most manufacturers will publish any weight restrictions that exist. In particular, some saddles are not warranteed for riders over 190-200 pounds.

You will also want to pay attention to the wheels you choose. Good wheels with 32 spokes are often recommended for heavier riders, especially if your riding style is hard on wheels.