Are there any tall and heavy riders out there ?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by bkatelis, Sep 21, 2003.

  1. bkatelis

    bkatelis New Member

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    I'm a beginner (with a bit of experience on a hybrid bike) and looking for advice.

    I am 195cm tall (6ft5in) and weigh 112kg (247lbs) and am looking for advice as to what frame sizes similar sized riders have bought.

    Exp riders have told me that the most important aspect of choosing a bike is getting the size right - but the LBS's I have enquired in seem to all want to just sell me a bike rather than ensure I have the right.

    What sizes do people have ? and is the measurement a C-C or C-T measurement?

    thanks for your help
    bill
    (Melbourne, Aus)
     
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  2. abv8

    abv8 New Member

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    bkatelis,

    Getting the size right is very important, as is getting the bike fitted, which includes seat height and alignment, handlebar adjustments etc. Make sure you choose an LBS that will fit the bike for you, as well as sell you a bike which would best suit your needs, in this case, size and material are very important.

    You will find that like LBS's ;) bikes differ and some bikes are measured C-C and some are measured C-T. I read somewhere once when I first started getting a bike that the best way to shop around and select an LBS that knows what their doing is to ask them if a particular bike thier trying to sell you is measured C-C or C-T. If te salesman looks at you in doubt, kindly leave the store and go to another one.

    Cheers
     
  3. abv8

    abv8 New Member

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    Actually I think I might have read that on one of these forums...apologies if Ive ripped someone off :)
     
  4. hedgehog

    hedgehog New Member

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    I'm not quite as tall (6'2") and not quite as heavy (205lbs) but I bought a 63 CT bike. I have quite long legs (36" cycling inseam) so I needed the bigger frame to avoid too much seat-to-bar drop.

    I went through all the measurements using the online calculator athttp://www.wrenchscience.com

    A custom fitting is better but this can at least give you a ballpark.
     
  5. bkatelis

    bkatelis New Member

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  6. semmed

    semmed New Member

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    I am a tall (6'3") and heavy rider (230 lbs) as well, and found that, as long as I do not race, pretty much any bike will do, as long as it is properly fitted. However (I am assuming that you are about as strong as I am), once you start racing you are at an elevated risk of cracking/breaking frames (esp. in criteriums), or you may experience significant oscillations in the frame at high speed (which can be a very scary experience indeed :eek: ). In this situation it is worthwhile considering a custom frame from a company that is used to dealing with taller/heavier riders. They will build you a frame of thicker and/or larger tubing and also adapt the frame geometry to improve strength/stiffness and to prevent the oscillations from ocurring -- off-course at significant cost.... :( .

    Note that for clydesdales like us a few ounces in frame weight are pretty much negligible.
     
  7. bkatelis

    bkatelis New Member

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    Thanks semmed ...

    The reference to clydesdales I liked - i'll use that in the future.

    Out of interest what size frame have you got ?
    C-C or C-T measurement ?

    thanks again
    bill
     
  8. RalleighOke

    RalleighOke New Member

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    Hi bkatelis,

    I'm very similiar to your height and weight.

    I have a large frame (compact) .. if you had to convert it to cm it should be in the region of 58 cm.

    Hope this helps.
     
  9. shaneo

    shaneo New Member

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    Bill

    I am 193cms and 95kgs and went for a 63cm caad7 cannondale....I have been riding the 63cm cannondales for a while now....they are a good frame for a big guy....very rigid and strong....in fact a 63cm would be very close to spot on for your size....

    make sure you get decent wheels that are built up strong for your size ( deep section rim, 36 spoke) you will find your biggest problem will not be the frame, but will be blowing spokes and wheels going out of true, if you ride to weak a wheel.....

    the most important thing for a big rider is not to get caught into buying gear that is not 'durable'. alot of cutting edge equipment is built for lightweight riders and you will end up killing it.....so talk to fellow 'big guys' and ignore the little fellows.

    check out the cannondales, as they are big (63cm) and strong frames. Otherwise go custom if you have lots of money!!!
     
  10. bkatelis

    bkatelis New Member

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    shaneo,

    Great advice - thanks.

    Out of interest the 63cm cannondale - is that a C-C measurement or a C-T measurement ?
     
  11. semmed

    semmed New Member

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    bkatelis

    I have a 62 cm (C-C) frame, However...

    you should not simply copy settings of somebody that is the same overall height as you -- there may still be significant deviations in the relative length of your arms, legs, etc. The best advice I can give you is to go to a good LBS and get properly fitted.

    To let not all of the good advice in this thread throw you for a loop I must come back to what experienced riders told you already, fit is the overriding factor in choice. Especially for (we'll keep it in animal terms) Giraffes that have to deal with significant stress on their lower backs. (btw start working on your abs!)

    If the fit is not right you will not even get to the mileage where other concerns such as quality are an issue.

    Shaneo had a good point about the wheels -- dont go for the low count, high tension spoked wheels. The type
    of wheel you're looking for is actually cheaper! (allthough my favorite set of wheels has the Mavic GP4 set of rims ...not cheap..., but 18 years old and still going! The only pieces of equipment that have lasted me longer than 4 years)

    Finally, I am not sure how serious you are about cycling and wether you intend to race. Many people make the mistake of buying a relatively expensive bike that is not quite raceworthy, and end up having to buy another if they get into racing. I'd personally buy a somewhat cheaper bike which is likely more durable. You can then allways move up to a full blown race machine and have this bike available for training, commuting and/or bad weather rides... not to mention cross races. Also, I can guarantee that you will only really find out what the important characteristics ofa bike for you are by logging many miles.
     
  12. Spider1977

    Spider1977 New Member

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    Bill,

    Go to a decent bike store in Melbourne, there are plenty of them that are staffed by people who will give you a good fitting. Try Cecil Walker cycles in Elizabeth Street for a start - I know they use a bike fitting system cause they advertise it on their web site.
     
  13. daveornee

    daveornee New Member

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    I suggest you read the fitting information on Peter White's web site at URL:
    http://www.peterwhitecycles.com/fitting.htm
    Your size and weight are only part of the situation.
    I worked in a bike shop. Frame size is very important. However, all the "rules of thumb" are only that.
    Yor strength, flexibility, and riding style will help determine what is best.
    Make sure the tires you need will easily clear your frame, fork, brakes, racks, and fenders. Also make sure that you can attain the handlebar height that works best for you. Lastly, make sure that you get a good three dimensional fit, including handlebar width.
    David Ornee, Western Springs, IL USA
     
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