Are there cassettes that NEVER wear out?



Coogs

New Member
Dec 1, 2022
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I have a '19 Marlin 5 - I use it like a road bike. In the summer months I average over 400 miles a week the past 3 years on it. So it has a lot of miles (over 10k). Aside from Slick 2.2" WTB tires she is factory. Today my chain snapped and I took it to my shop and dude told me that my entire drivetrain except the derailer needs to be replaced. I left with my bike and am now looking into purchasing it myself because I don't want to have to do this often. Will the higher-end cassettes hold up much longer than what a bike shop would put on? I keep my drivetrain very, very clean. I always clean it weekly, and if I'm on a ride in wet conditions or if I think some stuff got on it I clean it that night.. Park Tool chain cleaner along with scrubbing it all down with Bio Chainbrite CB-4. To give you an idea of how meticulous I am - I do it weekly so I have it down to a science but it still takes about 10 minutes.
I'm giving so much context so you see where I am coming from. I hate spending money on repairs so if I can buy something that is definitively of better quality and is proven to last longer I'm all about it.
 

Mr. Beanz

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Aug 18, 2015
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10,000 is really good for a cassette. About what I get on my road bike. I'm a heavy rider done tons of climbing app 40,000 ft per month. So I put some strain on my components.

I get 205 to Ultrgra cassettes on sale on the net for 30 to 30 bucks. Chains the same for about 30 bucks.

Shops are out to make money so they'll tell you anything to make a big sale.

Only thing you should need is a new cassette and chain. Pretty easy to install, watch some you tube videos.

Maybe the derailleur cables, about 10 bucks.

No reason you should need anything else unless you've crashed and thrashed your other components.

I spend about 50 yo 60 bucks every now and then to keep my machines running smooth.

Trick is to swap out the cassette and chain when you realize it ain't no longer running well.
 

Mr. Beanz

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Aug 18, 2015
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BTW, I have friends that swap out their Dura Ace chains and cassettes every 4000 miles because the shop mechanic suggested it.

Bunch of fools paying the shop owners kids way through college ha ha ha.
 

Mr. Beanz

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Aug 18, 2015
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Also, I bought a cheap $15 chain whip and cassette tool for $7 (?).

S cheap chain tool for $10. If you use sram and a quick connect link, you don't need a tool to install or remove the chain.
 

kcjc

New Member
Oct 16, 2022
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7 Speed? If so that's pretty good and I wouldn't bother going with higher end or upgrading unless you cannot source parts or if they are cheaper. Higher end stuff would likely move you to more speed (8 to 12) and expect longevity to dip the more speed you have. Why would they need to change out the shifters? Cassette, chain, crankset, cables, and housing would be my guess as minimal replacement needs. I would service the bottom bracket also (or replace it for wider options for crank replacement).

I think I have over 12k on my 7 speed Ultegra cassette, Dura Ace 7400 chain rings, and KMC chain before donating it. Except for the chain, everything was still ok. The longevity of my 11 speed stuff is far less. The chain is good for ~3k miles, ~6k miles for the cassette, and ~10k chain rings.
 

cobbwheels

Active Member
Dec 7, 2022
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I keep my drivetrain very, very clean. I always clean it weekly, and if I'm on a ride in wet conditions or if I think some stuff got on it I clean it that night.. Park Tool chain cleaner along with scrubbing it all down with Bio Chainbrite CB-4. To give you an idea of how meticulous I am - I do it weekly so I have it down to a science but it still takes about 10 minutes.
I'm giving so much context so you see where I am coming from.

Are you periodically checking / measuring your chain for stretch?

A stretched chain would wear out your cassette and chain rings faster. A chain no matter how well cared for will stretch to a significant degree eventually and a stretched chain will rapidly wear out your cassette and chainrings. Measure your chain periodically for stretch and replace when stretch tolerance is reached. For many recreational roadies, that's around 2k to 3k miles. It may sound excessive but consider a chain is far cheaper than the whole drivetrain.

Additionally, shift when needed. Don't be the guy who only uses 2-3 gears in their 11 speed cassette. You'll wear out the drive train sooner if you're that guy.

Finally, 10k miles is good mileage for a cassette although I've heard some get 30k miles out of their cassette.