Are these forks bent?

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Pete Biggs, Oct 19, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest



  2. Adam Rush

    Adam Rush Guest

    "John, Pauline & Hannah." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Absolutely knackered which is why it was in the pond! Regards, John.
    > PS Put it back where you found it?

    I'm staging a hungerstrike until I can find an Englishman to say that to me in person.
     
  3. James Hodson

    James Hodson Guest

    On Sun, 19 Oct 2003 21:48:37 -0400, "David L. Johnson" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Sun, 19 Oct 2003 15:40:01 +0000, Swampy wrote:
    >
    >> In article <[email protected]>,
    >> "frank121" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Bent
    >>
    >> it's called "rake"
    >
    >No, that is called the result of a head-on crash.

    As also seen on my bike when I cycled into the back of a dangerously fast parked car. My
    fault, M'Lud?

    It is quite hard to tell from Pete's pics. Also, if you're convinced the forks are bent, the more
    likely it is you'll think they are - even if they're not. If the forks really are damaged you'll
    soon notice a steering problem. When I had my bike repaired - new forks, new headset, new pretty
    much everything at the front - the riding was quite strange as I'd become used to riding a
    bent-forked bike.

    James

    --
    "Sorry mate, I didn't see you" is not a satisfactory excuse.
     
  4. James Hodson

    James Hodson Guest

    On Tue, 21 Oct 2003 15:30:27 +0100, "Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Site of Special Scientific Interest.

    IE, the greater spotted lesser Livingstone newt bat lives nearby.

    James

    --
    "Sorry mate, I didn't see you" is not a satisfactory excuse.
     
  5. Carl Fogel

    Carl Fogel Guest

    [email protected] (Carl Fogel) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    [snip]

    So in the UK "SSSI" stands for Site of Special Scientific Interest, meaning in this case some
    so-far-nameless estuary? And you guys gave us Shakespeare?

    Before I click on the deuglify button, let's see . . .

    "Lines composed a few miles above Tintern Abbey on revisiting the banks of the SSSI during a tour.
    July 13, 1798"

    No, it doesn't really improve Wordsworth. Let's try again . . .

    In Xanadu did Kubla Khan A stately pleasure dome decree: Where Alph, the sacred SSSI, ran . . .

    It just doesn't sound like Coleridge. One more chance . . .

    Sweet Swan of Avon! what a sight it were To see thee in our SSSI yet appeare . . .

    No, I can't see Jonson working this acronym into his elegy for Shakespeare--too much
    goose-like hissing.

    On the other hand, this sort of government-babble gave us "Yes, Minister" and "Yes, Prime Minister,"
    so I suppose that there's a silver lining.

    Carl Fogel
     
  6. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    "Carl Fogel" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > So in the UK "SSSI" stands for Site of Special Scientific Interest, meaning in this case some
    > so-far-nameless estuary? And you guys gave us Shakespeare?

    To treat a humorous post seriously (generally a mistake):

    Although the Humber Estuary is devoid of many things, a name is not one of them.

    An SSSI is an official designation which protects areas which have some unusual scientific merit,
    such as the breeding grounds of rare species. Here's some info:
    http://www.naturenet.net/status/sssi.html

    You have them over the pond as well, but I think under a different acronym.

    SSSI is simply an ETLA, and the existence of such does not indicate the decline of the English
    language - probably.

    --
    Guy
    ===

    WARNING: may contain traces of irony. Contents may settle after posting.
    http://www.chapmancentral.com
     
  7. Carl Fogel

    Carl Fogel Guest

    "Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    > "Carl Fogel" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    > > So in the UK "SSSI" stands for Site of Special Scientific Interest, meaning in this case some
    > > so-far-nameless estuary? And you guys gave us Shakespeare?
    >

    [snip]

    >
    > To treat a humorous post seriously (generally a mistake):
    >
    > Although the Humber Estuary is devoid of many things, a name is not one of them.
    >
    > An SSSI is an official designation which protects areas which have some unusual scientific merit,
    > such as the breeding grounds of rare species. Here's some info:
    > http://www.naturenet.net/status/sssi.html
    >
    > You have them over the pond as well, but I think under a different acronym.
    >
    > SSSI is simply an ETLA, and the existence of such does not indicate the decline of the English
    > language - probably.

    Dear Guy,

    Aaaaargh! "SSSI is simply an ETLA . . ."

    If'n ya don't watch out, yer gonna turn into a burey-crat!

    What the hell's an ETLA?

    (Google suggested some Finnish acronym resembling SSSI, but a possibly horrible coincidence showed
    wETLAnd. I gave up when I began thinking of shETLAnd ponies.)

    'Round these parts, we call 'em Wilderness Areas, like the Greenhorn Mountain Wildnerness Area,
    which sounds fancier'n "park" and fools folks into thinking that I didn't ride motorcycles over the
    peak in the early 1970's. The mountain lions like it.

    (Nope, Greenhorn don't mean nuthin' about dudes 'r tenderfeet. Governor of Santa Fe got right tired
    in th'late 1700's of them-there Comanches killin' everyone they couldn't rape, rob, 'r sell fer
    slaves, so he whistled up some soldier-boys from down Old Mexico way, 'n they caught up with ol'
    Cuerno Verde 'n kilt him dead, 'long with all th'men, women, 'n young'uns in th'band, right under
    th'mountain. The chief couldn't hardly complain, got just what he liked to give out. 'Sides, they
    named th'biggest heap'a dirt in sight after him'n'his green-painted buffalo-horn war-bonnet.)

    Carl Fogel

    P.S. Must have missed the Humber somewhere earlier in the thread. Maybe it was covered
    with acronyms?

    C.F.
     
  8. [email protected] (Carl Fogel) writes:
    > Aaaaargh! "SSSI is simply an ETLA . . ."

    A TLA is a "Three Letter Acronym". Supposed to be a self-referencing joke. I would guess that an
    ETLA is an "Extended TLA".

    Chris
    --
    Chris Colohan Email: [email protected] PGP: finger [email protected] Web: www.colohan.com Phone:
    (412)268-4751
     
  9. Carl Fogel

    Carl Fogel Guest

    Christopher Brian Colohan <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > [email protected] (Carl Fogel) writes:
    > > Aaaaargh! "SSSI is simply an ETLA . . ."
    >
    > A TLA is a "Three Letter Acronym". Supposed to be a self-referencing joke. I would guess that an
    > ETLA is an "Extended TLA".
    >
    > Chris

    Dear Chris,

    I bet you're right. Why do I have such bad luck with my search results? IIDHBLIWHALAA. (I assume the
    acronym is self-explanatory.)

    Here's what came up when I looked for ETLA, something about Finnish forest services:

    etla Services Menu Forest information Finnish Forest Research Institute. SERVICES & PRODUCTS.
    INTRODUCTION INFORMATION SERVICES MARKETING AND SALES CONTACT INFORMATION. www.metla.fi/palvelut/
    palvelut-menu-tietopalvelut-en.htm - 4k - Oct 20, 2003 - Cached - Similar pages

    Re: San Augustin Etla

    Carl Fogel
     
  10. Simon Mason

    Simon Mason Guest

    [email protected] (Carl Fogel) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    >
    > P.S. Must have missed the Humber somewhere earlier in the thread. Maybe it was covered with
    > acronyms?

    I don't think it *was* in this thread Carl. It was mentioned in an original thread on urc, but only
    referred to as a "river" here. BTW, this SSSI is not really like a national park. In this case,
    it's given that status due to the rare wading birds and molluscs that live in the mudflats. Simon.
     
  11. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    [email protected] (Carl Fogel) writes:

    > [email protected] (Carl Fogel) wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    > [snip]
    >
    > So in the UK "SSSI" stands for Site of Special Scientific Interest, meaning in this case some
    > so-far-nameless estuary? And you guys gave us Shakespeare?

    You simply don't understand British bureaucracy. It works like this. If you have a piece of
    agricultural land, it has a certain economic value. If you find rare lesser polka-dotted titwitchers
    nesting on it, it is of special scientific interest. If you designate it as being of Special
    Scientific Interest, so that the farmer can't plough it up, overgraze it, drain it, reseed it or use
    pesticides on it, it's economic value (obviously) drops. When you're planning the route of a new
    road, you (obviously) seek to route it through areas with the least economic value. So....

    Embarrasingly, this _still_ really is true. The problem has been noted and a change of policy will
    be forthcoming, when the bureaucrats have worked out how to put an appropriate economic value on
    scientific interest.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    Wise man with foot in mouth use opportunity to clean toes.
    ;; the Worlock
     
  12. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    "Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]> writes:

    > "Carl Fogel" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    > > So in the UK "SSSI" stands for Site of Special Scientific Interest, meaning in this case some
    > > so-far-nameless estuary? And you guys gave us Shakespeare?
    >
    > SSSI is simply an ETLA, and the existence of such does not indicate the decline of the English
    > language - probably.

    Surely the mere existance of acronyms of any kind indicate the decline of the English language?

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    Wise man with foot in mouth use opportunity to clean toes.
    ;; the Worlock
     
  13. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

  14. W K

    W K Guest

    "Simon Brooke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]> writes:

    > > SSSI is simply an ETLA, and the existence of such does not indicate the decline of the English
    > > language - probably.
    >
    > Surely the mere existance of acronyms of any kind indicate the decline of the English language?

    There are worse things than excessive acronymificationism.
     
  15. Tim Downie

    Tim Downie Guest

    Christopher Brian Colohan wrote:
    > [email protected] (Carl Fogel) writes:
    >> Aaaaargh! "SSSI is simply an ETLA . . ."
    >
    > A TLA is a "Three Letter Acronym".

    <pedant mode>

    Except that it's not.

    Acronym: a word formed from or based on the initial letters or syllables of other words, such as
    radar (Acronym from radio detection and ranging).

    Other examples, LASER (light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation), UNESCO (United
    Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization), OXFAM (Oxford Committee for Famine
    Relief) etc.

    Now unless you pronouce TLAs as talaas, you can't really call it an acronym. What a TLA is is a
    three letter abbreviation. </pedant mode>

    Sorry about that. Can't always help myself.

    Tim

    --
    Remove the obvious to reply by email.
     
  16. "Tim Downie" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    snipped

    >
    > Now unless you pronouce TLAs as talaas, you can't really call it an
    acronym.
    > What a TLA is is a three letter abbreviation. </pedant mode>
    >
    > Sorry about that. Can't always help myself.
    >
    > Tim

    Don't worry, I loved it.
    ___
    Michael MacClancy
     
  17. "W K" <[email protected]>typed

    > "Simon Brooke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > "Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]> writes:

    > > > SSSI is simply an ETLA, and the existence of such does not indicate the decline of the English
    > > > language - probably.
    > >
    > > Surely the mere existance of acronyms of any kind indicate the decline of the English language?

    > There are worse things than excessive acronymificationism.

    Like my medical colleagues with that rather painful polydiplomatosis...

    --
    Helen D. Vecht: [email protected] Edgware.
     
  18. Simon Mason

    Simon Mason Guest

    "James Hodson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Sun, 19 Oct 2003 21:48:37 -0400, "David L. Johnson" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >On Sun, 19 Oct 2003 15:40:01 +0000, Swampy wrote:
    > >
    > >> In article <[email protected]>,
    > >> "frank121" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >>
    > >>> Bent
    > >>
    > >> it's called "rake"
    > >
    > >No, that is called the result of a head-on crash.
    >
    > As also seen on my bike when I cycled into the back of a dangerously fast parked car. My
    > fault, M'Lud?
    >
    > It is quite hard to tell from Pete's pics. Also, if you're convinced the forks are bent, the more
    > likely it is you'll think they are - even if they're not. If the forks really are damaged you'll
    > soon notice a steering problem. When I had my bike repaired - new forks, new headset, new pretty
    > much everything at the front - the riding was

    I can't really tell from looking at them - and they're in my garage! I shall only really find out
    when I get to ride it. Simon
     
  19. Carol Hague

    Carol Hague Guest

    Carl Fogel <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > I bet you're right. Why do I have such bad luck with my search results? IIDHBLIWHALAA. (I assume
    > the acronym is self-explanatory.)

    If you find any more puzzling acronyms you could try http://www.acronymfinder.com/

    HTH HAND.

    --
    Carol Hague "...you can find absolutely ANYthing on the internet - with the exception of the one
    thing you're looking for."
    - Darrel Hoffman on alt.games.diablo2
     
  20. Carl Fogel

    Carl Fogel Guest

    [email protected] (Simon Mason) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > [email protected] (Carl Fogel) wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    > >
    > > P.S. Must have missed the Humber somewhere earlier in the thread. Maybe it was covered with
    > > acronyms?
    >
    > I don't think it *was* in this thread Carl. It was mentioned in an original thread on urc, but
    > only referred to as a "river" here. BTW, this SSSI is not really like a national park. In this
    > case, it's given that status due to the rare wading birds and molluscs that live in the
    > mudflats. Simon.

    Dear Simon,

    Ah, the fruits of tact and base cunning.

    I couldn't resist at least hinting that no one had mentioned the Humber in this thread, but I stayed
    my bloody hand and phrased my outrage obsequiously.

    Instead of a flame-fest, I've bagged not only the information that I may not be able to visit and
    wade in the mud with your birds and clams (no loss, since I spend my weekends startling great blue
    herons amidst the ten-inch freshwater clams of the Arkansas), but also the knowledge that certain
    primitive acronym-loving tribes across the seas refer to themselves as urks (not that they seem
    particularly irksome), while my own adopted band is known by the more frog-like croak, rbts.

    Ribbet!

    Carl Fogel
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...