Armstrong and Ferrari

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Sierraman, Mar 2, 2004.

  1. Sierraman

    Sierraman Guest

    Interesting article about Armstrong potential as a role model in the drug war, but with a touch
    of Cynicism.

    Armstrong has turned into an icon, a fairy-tale hero who beat cancer and then subdued the Alps. His
    connections to Italian doctor and trainer Michele Ferrari don't square with the fairy tale, so they
    are routinely overlooked.

    Ferrari is on trial in Italy, charged with illegally administering drugs to cyclists there. His work
    with Armstrong was revealed in the London Sunday Times almost three years ago. The doctor already
    had been charged at the time. His trial has lasted an eternity, hinting at the complexities. The
    latest delay was called to allow the defense to gather more expert testimony.

    How often do we read Ferrari's name in stories about Armstrong?

    http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2004/03/02/SPGOI5C0RH1.DTL

    B-
     
    Tags:


  2. B. Lafferty

    B. Lafferty Guest

    "Sierraman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Interesting article about Armstrong potential as a role model in the drug war, but with a touch of
    > Cynicism.
    >
    > Armstrong has turned into an icon, a fairy-tale hero who beat cancer and then subdued the Alps.
    > His connections to Italian doctor and trainer
    Michele
    > Ferrari don't square with the fairy tale, so they are routinely
    overlooked.
    >
    > Ferrari is on trial in Italy, charged with illegally administering drugs
    to
    > cyclists there. His work with Armstrong was revealed in the London Sunday Times almost three years
    > ago. The doctor already had been charged at the time. His trial has lasted an eternity, hinting at
    > the complexities. The latest delay was called to allow the defense to gather more expert
    > testimony.
    >
    > How often do we read Ferrari's name in stories about Armstrong?
    >
    >
    >
    http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2004/03/02/SPGOI5C0RH1.DTL
    >
    > B-

    Get ready for the attack of the Krispy Tifosi! I wonder if Kristin will have a ten year gag order as
    part of her settlement like David Bowie's ex had in hers.
     
  3. My response, which is nitpicking facts, and doesn't address the drug issue
    at all; just so Lafferty can't call me one of the "Lance tifosi":

    -----

    Ms. Knapp --

    Regarding your recent article on sfgate.com about drugs in sport and Lance Armstrong:

    Point of fact ... You wrote: "Still, why ask Armstrong to the White House for a summit aimed at
    sports officials?

    "First, he works for a government-backed monopoly. The U.S. Postal Service sponsors Armstrong's
    team, despite operating at a deficit steeper than any mountain he climbs."

    Actually, Lance Armstrong works for Tailwind Sports (http://www.tailwindsports.com), a sports
    marketing company owned by Thom Weisel (of San Francisco's own Thomas Weisel Partners). Tailwind
    Sports owns and operates the cycling team, as well as the T-Mobile International cycling race,
    formerly known as the San Francisco Grand Prix.

    The US Postal Service is the title sponsor of the team, which means that they are paying Tailwind
    Sports to advertise the Postal Service. The team is also sponsored to one extent or another by Berry
    Floor (a Belgian laminate flooring manufacturer, similar to Pergo), Trek bicycles, Visa, Suburu,
    Thomas Weisel Partners, AMD (Advanced Micro Devices), Dial Corporation (the soap manufacturers) and
    Coca-Cola and a host of cycling related companies.

    Lance Armstrong has personal sponsorship from Nike, Bristol Myers Squibb, and Oakley.

    Of all the above-listed companies, the only one other than Tailwind Sports which has "employed"
    Armstrong was Oakley, who made him an employee so he would be covered under their benefits plan when
    he was undergoing treatment for testicular cancer.

    I don't know if he is still listed as an employee, or if he has gone back to his independent
    contractor status with them.

    Armstrong is definitely NOT a government employee and does not work for the Postal Service.

    On another note:

    The United States Postal Service had $63.9 billion in operating expenses in 2003 (Source:
    http://www.usps.com/history/anrpt03/html/highlights.htm). The $4-6 million (estimated) they spend on
    the cycling team is a negligible part of their overall operating expenses, and a very small part of
    their estimated $160-200 million annual advertising budget.

    Personally, I think their advertising money is better spent on sponsoring a cycling team than on
    running television commercials during other sporting events ... A 30-second spot during the Super
    Bowl costs what, about $2 million?

    Their sponsorship of the cycling team generates exposure throughout the entire year; peaking during
    July ... Lance wins the Tour (the only bike race most Americans even know about), and "USPS" is on
    everyone's lips for weeks.

    And it's worked ... I certainly ship more packages via the USPS now, rather than via UPS or Fed-Ex
    ... They support my sport, and I support them in return.

    Kindest regards,

    Steven L. Sheffield (a former City of San Francisco resident, currently residing in Utah)

    On 03/02/2004 10:01 PM, in article [email protected], "Sierraman"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Interesting article about Armstrong potential as a role model in the drug war, but with a touch of
    > Cynicism.
    >
    > Armstrong has turned into an icon, a fairy-tale hero who beat cancer and then subdued the Alps.
    > His connections to Italian doctor and trainer Michele Ferrari don't square with the fairy tale, so
    > they are routinely overlooked.
    >
    > Ferrari is on trial in Italy, charged with illegally administering drugs to cyclists there. His
    > work with Armstrong was revealed in the London Sunday Times almost three years ago. The doctor
    > already had been charged at the time. His trial has lasted an eternity, hinting at the
    > complexities. The latest delay was called to allow the defense to gather more expert testimony.
    >
    > How often do we read Ferrari's name in stories about Armstrong?
    >
    >
    > http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2004/03/02/SPGOI5C0RH1.DTL
    >
    > B-
    >
    >

    --
    Steven L. Sheffield stevens at veloworks dot com veloworks at worldnet dot ay tea tee dot net bellum
    pax est libertas servitus est ignoratio vis est ess ay ell tea ell ay kay ee sea aye tee why you ti
    ay aitch aitch tee tea pea colon [for word] slash [four ward] slash double-you double-yew double-ewe
    dot veloworks dot com [four word] slash
     
  4. B. Lafferty

    B. Lafferty Guest

    Dear Nitpicker,

    Your points are technically correct. However, I ship things USPS priority not because of USPS
    Dingleberry Floor, but because it's cheaper and as fast, or faster, than the other shippers.
    It's probably the same reason Excel Sports uses USPS Priority as their normal shipper.

    I think the author has a hell of a lot of nerve singling out cycling with all of its deaths.
    These are all just undiagnosed, congenital heart defects causing untimely tragedy. And just
    because Armstrong was in contact with Ferrari on an almost daily basis (as stated by Armstrong
    himself) doesn't mean that he was using Ferrari to juice. Hell, Ferrari was just supplementing
    the CTS advice Armstrong was getting from Chris C. Probably like getting a second medical
    opinion. Where there's smoke, there isn't always fire.

    All the best, Brian

    "Steven L. Sheffield" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:BC6B1FF9.25BCB%[email protected]...
    >
    >
    > My response, which is nitpicking facts, and doesn't address the drug issue at all; just so
    > Lafferty can't call me one of the "Lance tifosi":
    >
    > -----
    >
    > Ms. Knapp --
    >
    > Regarding your recent article on sfgate.com about drugs in sport and Lance Armstrong:
    >
    > Point of fact ... You wrote: "Still, why ask Armstrong to the White House for a summit aimed at
    > sports officials?
    >
    > "First, he works for a government-backed monopoly. The U.S. Postal Service sponsors Armstrong's
    > team, despite operating at a deficit steeper than any mountain he climbs."
    >
    > Actually, Lance Armstrong works for Tailwind Sports (http://www.tailwindsports.com), a sports
    > marketing company owned by Thom Weisel (of San Francisco's own Thomas Weisel Partners). Tailwind
    > Sports owns and operates the cycling team, as well as the T-Mobile International cycling race,
    > formerly known as the San Francisco Grand Prix.
    >
    > The US Postal Service is the title sponsor of the team, which means that they are paying Tailwind
    > Sports to advertise the Postal Service. The team is also sponsored to one extent or another by
    > Berry Floor (a Belgian laminate flooring manufacturer, similar to Pergo), Trek bicycles, Visa,
    > Suburu, Thomas Weisel Partners, AMD (Advanced Micro Devices), Dial Corporation (the soap
    > manufacturers) and Coca-Cola and a host of cycling related companies.
    >
    > Lance Armstrong has personal sponsorship from Nike, Bristol Myers Squibb, and Oakley.
    >
    > Of all the above-listed companies, the only one other than Tailwind Sports which has "employed"
    > Armstrong was Oakley, who made him an employee so he would be covered under their benefits plan
    > when he was undergoing
    treatment
    > for testicular cancer.
    >
    > I don't know if he is still listed as an employee, or if he has gone back
    to
    > his independent contractor status with them.
    >
    > Armstrong is definitely NOT a government employee and does not work for
    the
    > Postal Service.
    >
    > On another note:
    >
    > The United States Postal Service had $63.9 billion in operating expenses
    in
    > 2003 (Source: http://www.usps.com/history/anrpt03/html/highlights.htm).
    The
    > $4-6 million (estimated) they spend on the cycling team is a negligible
    part
    > of their overall operating expenses, and a very small part of their estimated $160-200 million
    > annual advertising budget.
    >
    > Personally, I think their advertising money is better spent on sponsoring
    a
    > cycling team than on running television commercials during other sporting events ... A 30-second
    > spot during the Super Bowl costs what, about $2 million?
    >
    > Their sponsorship of the cycling team generates exposure throughout the entire year; peaking
    > during July ... Lance wins the Tour (the only bike
    race
    > most Americans even know about), and "USPS" is on everyone's lips for
    weeks.
    >
    > And it's worked ... I certainly ship more packages via the USPS now,
    rather
    > than via UPS or Fed-Ex ... They support my sport, and I support them in return.
    >
    > Kindest regards,
    >
    > Steven L. Sheffield (a former City of San Francisco resident, currently residing in Utah)
    >
    >
    >
    > On 03/02/2004 10:01 PM, in article [email protected], "Sierraman"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Interesting article about Armstrong potential as a role model in the
    drug
    > > war, but with a touch of Cynicism.
    > >
    > > Armstrong has turned into an icon, a fairy-tale hero who beat cancer and then subdued the Alps.
    > > His connections to Italian doctor and trainer
    Michele
    > > Ferrari don't square with the fairy tale, so they are routinely
    overlooked.
    > >
    > > Ferrari is on trial in Italy, charged with illegally administering drugs
    to
    > > cyclists there. His work with Armstrong was revealed in the London
    Sunday
    > > Times almost three years ago. The doctor already had been charged at the time. His trial has
    > > lasted an eternity, hinting at the complexities. The latest delay was called to allow the
    > > defense to gather more expert testimony.
    > >
    > > How often do we read Ferrari's name in stories about Armstrong?
    > >
    > >
    > >
    http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2004/03/02/SPGOI5C0RH1.DTL
    > >
    > > B-
    > >
    > >
    >
    > --
    > Steven L. Sheffield stevens at veloworks dot com veloworks at worldnet dot ay tea tee dot net
    > bellum pax est libertas servitus est ignoratio vis est ess ay ell tea ell ay kay ee sea aye tee
    > why you ti ay aitch aitch tee tea pea colon [for word] slash [four ward] slash double-you double-
    > yew double-ewe dot veloworks dot com [four word] slash
     
  5. "Sierraman" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Interesting article about Armstrong potential as a role model in the drug war, but with a touch of
    > Cynicism.
    >
    > Armstrong has turned into an icon, a fairy-tale hero who beat cancer and then subdued the Alps.
    > His connections to Italian doctor and trainer Michele Ferrari don't square with the fairy tale, so
    > they are routinely overlooked.
    >
    > Ferrari is on trial in Italy, charged with illegally administering drugs to cyclists there. His
    > work with Armstrong was revealed in the London Sunday Times almost three years ago. The doctor
    > already had been charged at the time. His trial has lasted an eternity, hinting at the
    > complexities. The latest delay was called to allow the defense to gather more expert testimony.
    >
    > How often do we read Ferrari's name in stories about Armstrong?
    >
    >
    > http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2004/03/02/SPGOI5C0RH1.DTL
    >
    > B-

    As far as I know and or have read in the past, Armstrong has never denied working with Ferrari in
    the past, and I believe he consults with him now, or has in the recent past. I think is much adieu
    about nothing once again. I'm sure the Armstrong pundits will have everyone believe different.
     
  6. Tom Paterson

    Tom Paterson Guest

    >From: "Steven L. Sheffield"

    (someone quoted):

    >"First, he works for a government-backed monopoly. The U.S. Postal Service sponsors Armstrong's
    >team, despite operating at a deficit steeper than any mountain he climbs."

    To add to Mr. Sheffield's list of corrections, obviously USPS has competition from UPS and FedEx for
    packages and overnight letter delivery.

    Going on, strictly my content: Neither of the latter (UPS, FedEx), for the mountains of advertising
    money spent, has succeeded in linking to the equal of
    Mr. Armstrong.

    I would guess that those who complain about USPS operating deficits are the loudest squealers when
    letter rates are raised (sooo-ey!). Of course the reality is that USPS is a plum to be picked, could
    it be reached. Then the mail could go to hell like the airlines (while consuming billions in
    corporate welfare).

    Interestingly, I was told "we're not supposed to have those [Armstrong, bike team posters, other
    materials] in here" in two USPS substations in '02. Not the case at all in another city, where
    employees took pride in Lance and his team "delivering the mail". Ironic since the Lance-less
    offices were in Austin. "Were" because lo and behold, a Lance-in-yellow poster is displayed and
    offered for sale this year at my local USPS station. This is a former neighborhood office for "the
    Armstrongs", so maybe Lance hisself made the call. Yes, the bike team's success is a source of pride
    for the workers there. Anathema!

    BTW, USPS Priority works great for small packages. The convenience/cost/delievery time aspects are
    superior to the competition, both for sending and receiving, in my experience.

    (Gwen Knapp quoted):

    >> How often do we read Ferrari's name in >>stories about Armstrong?

    All the time, around here. Lance's name was mentioned early on with Barry Bonds'; apparently he (LA)
    wasn't on the Conte customer list, for all the salivatin' expectation.

    Open to correction. --TP
     
  7. Sierraman <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Interesting article about Armstrong potential as a role model in the drug war, but with a touch of
    > Cynicism.

    Damn, I thought this was going to be about which car he drives. A Subaru or a Ferrari? It's easier
    to put a bike rack on the first, but then again Ullrich drives/drove a Porsche. Anyway, not very
    cycling-related.

    Didier

    --
    Didier A Depireux [email protected] [email protected] 685 W.Baltimore Str
    http://neurobiology.umaryland.edu/depireux.htm Anatomy and Neurobiology Phone: 410-706-1272 (off)
    University of Maryland -1273 (lab) Baltimore MD 21201 USA Fax: 1-410-706-2512
     
  8. Robert Chung

    Robert Chung Guest

    Tom Paterson wrote:
    >
    > I would guess that those who complain about USPS operating deficits are the loudest squealers when
    > letter rates are raised (sooo-ey!).

    The USPS does *not* have an operating deficit -- it actually cleared a *profit* of about $4.5
    billion from operations in FY2003. It still has $2 billion in accumulated debt.

    http://www.usps.com/history/anrpt03/
     
  9. John Everett

    John Everett Guest

    On Wed, 03 Mar 2004 12:39:08 GMT, "Steven L. Sheffield"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Their sponsorship of the cycling team generates exposure throughout the entire year; peaking during
    >July ... Lance wins the Tour (the only bike race most Americans even know about), and "USPS" is on
    >everyone's lips for weeks.
    >
    >And it's worked ... I certainly ship more packages via the USPS now, rather than via UPS or Fed-Ex
    >... They support my sport, and I support them in return.

    Nice that USPS has gotten your attention, but we should recognize that their primary advertising
    audience via the cycling team is Europe. When Congress loosened the reins a number of years ago,
    allowing USPS to compete for the overseas parcel business, sponsorship of the cycling team was a
    primary component of their strategy to increase awareness of USPS in Europe. I think it's worked.

    jeverett3<AT>earthlink<DOT>net http://home.earthlink.net/~jeverett3
     
  10. GaryG

    GaryG Guest

    "Tom Paterson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > >From: "Steven L. Sheffield"
    >
    [snipped]
    >
    > BTW, USPS Priority works great for small packages. The convenience/cost/delievery time aspects are
    > superior to the competition,
    both
    > for sending and receiving, in my experience.
    >

    Agreed. And, as a recipient of packages, I much prefer USPS where my package is delivered securely
    in a locked box instead of being left out on my porch. Whenever I have a choice, I specify USPS.

    --
    ~_-* ...G/ \G http://www.CycliStats.com CycliStats - Software for Cyclists
     
  11. On Wed, 03 Mar 2004 17:20:17 GMT, John Everett
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >Nice that USPS has gotten your attention, but we should recognize that their primary advertising
    >audience via the cycling team is Europe.

    Although they certainly get a lot of play out of the team in advertisements. I never quite
    understood the one that emphasized teamwork, but showed them falling down at least twice.

    Curtis L. Russell Odenton, MD (USA) Just someone on two wheels...
     
  12. Robert Chung

    Robert Chung Guest

    John Everett wrote:
    >>
    > Nice that USPS has gotten your attention, but we should recognize that their primary advertising
    > audience via the cycling team is Europe. When Congress loosened the reins a number of years ago,
    > allowing USPS to compete for the overseas parcel business,

    And how is that working for them?
     
  13. Clovis Lark

    Clovis Lark Guest

    John Everett <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Wed, 03 Mar 2004 12:39:08 GMT, "Steven L. Sheffield" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >>Their sponsorship of the cycling team generates exposure throughout the entire year; peaking
    >>during July ... Lance wins the Tour (the only bike race most Americans even know about), and
    >>"USPS" is on everyone's lips for weeks.
    >>
    >>And it's worked ... I certainly ship more packages via the USPS now, rather than via UPS or Fed-Ex
    >>... They support my sport, and I support them in return.

    > Nice that USPS has gotten your attention, but we should recognize that their primary advertising
    > audience via the cycling team is Europe. When Congress loosened the reins a number of years ago,
    > allowing USPS to compete for the overseas parcel business, sponsorship of the cycling team was a
    > primary component of their strategy to increase awareness of USPS in Europe. I think it's worked.

    I've always wondered why they didn't acknowledge their sponsorship and successes by providing
    Express Mail pickup boxes on the street painted yellow.

    > jeverett3<AT>earthlink<DOT>net http://home.earthlink.net/~jeverett3
     
  14. Jeff Jones

    Jeff Jones Guest

    "John Everett" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > Nice that USPS has gotten your attention, but we should recognize that their primary advertising
    > audience via the cycling team is Europe. When Congress loosened the reins a number of years ago,
    > allowing USPS to compete for the overseas parcel business, sponsorship of the cycling team was a
    > primary component of their strategy to increase awareness of USPS in Europe. I think it's worked.
    >
    Just curious, has anyone ever seen any TV ads in Europe for USPS featuring Lance Armstrong and/or
    the cycling team? I'm not talking about the (considerable) TV exposure they get during the Tour, but
    whether they're actually allowed to do anything extra with the team, a la Quick.Step?

    Jeff
     
  15. B. Lafferty

    B. Lafferty Guest

    "Jeff Jones" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "John Everett" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > Nice that USPS has gotten your attention, but we should recognize that their primary advertising
    > > audience via the cycling team is Europe. When Congress loosened the reins a number of years ago,
    > > allowing USPS to compete for the overseas parcel business, sponsorship of the cycling team was a
    > > primary component of their strategy to increase awareness of USPS in Europe. I think it's
    > > worked.
    > >
    > Just curious, has anyone ever seen any TV ads in Europe for USPS featuring Lance Armstrong and/or
    > the cycling team? I'm not talking about the (considerable) TV exposure they get during the Tour,
    > but whether they're actually allowed to do anything extra with the team, a la Quick.Step?
    >
    > Jeff

    Have you ever seen a USPS delivery truck competing with FedEx, UPS or DHL in Europe? Ever seen a
    USPS office in Europe to drop off packages for shipment to the US or anyplace else?
     
  16. Smmb

    Smmb Guest

    "Jeff Jones" <[email protected]> a écrit dans le message de :
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "John Everett" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > Nice that USPS has gotten your attention, but we should recognize that their primary advertising
    > > audience via the cycling team is Europe. When Congress loosened the reins a number of years ago,
    > > allowing USPS to compete for the overseas parcel business, sponsorship of the cycling team was a
    > > primary component of their strategy to increase awareness of USPS in Europe. I think it's
    > > worked.
    > >
    > Just curious, has anyone ever seen any TV ads in Europe for USPS featuring Lance Armstrong and/or
    > the cycling team? I'm not talking about the (considerable) TV exposure they get during the Tour,
    > but whether they're actually allowed to do anything extra with the team, a la Quick.Step?
    >
    > Jeff
    >
    >
    Never, but that's not saying much, given my viewing habits....
    --
    Bonne route,

    Sandy Paris FR
     
  17. Jeff Jones

    Jeff Jones Guest

    "B. Lafferty" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Jeff Jones" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > Just curious, has anyone ever seen any TV ads in Europe for USPS
    featuring
    > > Lance Armstrong and/or the cycling team? I'm not talking about the (considerable) TV exposure
    > > they get during the Tour, but whether they're actually allowed to do anything extra with the
    > > team, a la Quick.Step?
    > >
    > > Jeff
    >
    > Have you ever seen a USPS delivery truck competing with FedEx, UPS or DHL
    in
    > Europe? Ever seen a USPS office in Europe to drop off packages for
    shipment
    > to the US or anyplace else?
    >
    No, but I haven't looked ;-) I receive parcels either via FedEx or ordinary post, and I've seen UPS
    and DHL trucks around Gent. But nothing recognisable as USPS.

    What's the story in France? Robert? Anyone? Bueller?

    Jeff
     
  18. Gwhite

    Gwhite Guest

    Tom Paterson wrote:
    >

    > Going on, strictly my content: Neither of the latter (UPS, FedEx), for the mountains of
    > advertising money spent, has succeeded in linking to the equal of
    > Mr. Armstrong.

    ???

    > I would guess that those who complain about USPS operating deficits are the loudest squealers when
    > letter rates are raised (sooo-ey!).

    And why not?

    > Of course the reality is that USPS is a plum to be picked, could it be reached.

    Exactly. But it can't because it is a protected monopoly.

    > Then the mail could go to hell like the airlines ...

    Yes, the airlines are a major disaster. More people are flying than ever before. Great point.
     
  19. Gwhite

    Gwhite Guest

    GaryG wrote:
    >

    > And, as a recipient of packages, I much prefer USPS where my package is delivered securely in a
    > locked box instead of being left out on my porch.

    By law the other package carriers are not allowed to put packages in the "mailbox."
     
  20. Smmb

    Smmb Guest

    "B. Lafferty" <[email protected]> a écrit dans le message de :
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Jeff Jones" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > "John Everett" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > >
    > > > Nice that USPS has gotten your attention, but we should recognize that their primary
    > > > advertising audience via the cycling team is Europe. When Congress loosened the reins a number
    > > > of years ago, allowing USPS to compete for the overseas parcel business, sponsorship of the
    > > > cycling team was a primary component of their strategy to increase awareness of USPS in
    > > > Europe. I think it's worked.
    > > >
    > > Just curious, has anyone ever seen any TV ads in Europe for USPS
    featuring
    > > Lance Armstrong and/or the cycling team? I'm not talking about the (considerable) TV exposure
    > > they get during the Tour, but whether they're actually allowed to do anything extra with the
    > > team, a la Quick.Step?
    > >
    > > Jeff
    >
    > Have you ever seen a USPS delivery truck competing with FedEx, UPS or DHL
    in
    > Europe? Ever seen a USPS office in Europe to drop off packages for
    shipment
    > to the US or anyplace else?
    >
    Having some things sent to me from the US via USPS, they do not deliver, themselves. They contract
    for local delivery either with La Poste, or with a customs clearing house with combined delivery.
    --
    Bonne route,

    Sandy Paris FR
     
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