Army Physical Fitness Test



R

R. Gregg Reed

Guest
I have to take the Army Physical Fitness Test next May, six months from
now. I'd like to be the best in the unit, but in order for me to do this
I'll have to do 80 pushups, then probably between five and ten minutes
later do 80 situps, then minutes later run 2 miles in 12 minutes or
less.

My running is very strong. I could run the two mile in less than 12
minutes now, if running was the only thing I had to do. The problem is
that after doing pushups and situps I'm so exhausted I can do a fast
run.

My plan is to train hard for pushups and situps for the next six months,
so in May when I take the PFT they won't be such a physical drain, so
I'll be in better shape to run. Which brings me to my question.

What's the general direction my training should take? When I reach 80
pushups and situps, should I start trying to do more, like 100 or 120?
Or should I make them more difficult, like adding weights when I'm doing
them, or elevating my feet? Or some combination of the two? Or something
else entirely? Thanks for the help.
 
D

David.

Guest
On Sun, 11 Dec 2005 19:05:12 -0600, "R. Gregg Reed"
<[email protected]> wrote:

>I have to take the Army Physical Fitness Test next May, six months from
>now. I'd like to be the best in the unit, but in order for me to do this
>I'll have to do 80 pushups, then probably between five and ten minutes
>later do 80 situps, then minutes later run 2 miles in 12 minutes or
>less.
>
>My running is very strong. I could run the two mile in less than 12
>minutes now, if running was the only thing I had to do. The problem is
>that after doing pushups and situps I'm so exhausted I can do a fast
>run.
>
>My plan is to train hard for pushups and situps for the next six months,
>so in May when I take the PFT they won't be such a physical drain, so
>I'll be in better shape to run. Which brings me to my question.
>
>What's the general direction my training should take? When I reach 80
>pushups and situps, should I start trying to do more, like 100 or 120?
>Or should I make them more difficult, like adding weights when I'm doing
>them, or elevating my feet? Or some combination of the two? Or something
>else entirely? Thanks for the help.


You'll flunk, punk.

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L

locker

Guest
R. Gregg Reed wrote:

>
> What's the general direction my training should take? When I

reach
> 80 pushups and situps, should I start trying to do more, like

100
> or 120? Or should I make them more difficult, like adding

weights
> when I'm doing them, or elevating my feet? Or some combination

of
> the two? Or something else entirely? Thanks for the help.


Since you can run 2 miles at a 6 min/mile pace, you probably
aren't overweight. If you can lose any weight though, do it and
start doing it now. The PFT test is an endurance test, so body
mass isn't important. Don't lose weight too fast, 1-2 lbs. a
week.

First find out exactly where you are now. How many pushups can
you do and how many sit-ups. I would do all three at the same
time. Do your pushups to max, then sit-ups, then run the two
miles. If you run regularly you shouldn't have trouble with the
sit-ups, so do the pushups first.

I would want to have a cushion, so being able to do 85-90
wouldn't hurt. I wouldn't raise my feet or add weight; it's
about endurance.

Start preparing for the test NOW. Stop all exercise at least a
week before the test in May.


locker
 
L

L. Fine

Guest
I think you're overestimating the drain on your energy/endurance in
doing these three 'events' back to back. The Marine Corps PFT is 20
pullups in 2 minutes, 80 situps in 2 minutes and a 3 mile run in 18
minutes to get a perfect score. I was always a little slow on the run
(about 22 minutes) but could bang out the pullups and situps beforehand
and still be fired up for the run afterwards. The entire key to getting
a perfect score is to be MOTIVATED (get used to hearing that if you're
joining the Army). Whatever fires you up - whatever you can use to make
you angry and determined, use it. Look at the pushups and situps as
'appetizers' to get the run - the 'main course'.

As far as training, you should shoot to do at least 10-15% more reps
than called for on the appetizer events in your practice sessions. I'm
not sure they record what you do over and above the maximums (Marine
Corps PFT just gives you 100 points for maxing each event, so a 300 is
a perfect score). Therefore, you may be wasting your time (and some
energy) trying to do more than asked during the actual PFT, but it's
certainly a good strategy for your training regimen to aim a little
higher so that you're not likely to fall short.

Bottom line though - find something that fires you up! Hoorah!
 
R

R. Gregg Reed

Guest
"locker" <[email protected]> wrote in
news:[email protected]:

>
> Since you can run 2 miles at a 6 min/mile pace, you probably
> aren't overweight. If you can lose any weight though, do it and
> start doing it now. The PFT test is an endurance test, so body
> mass isn't important. Don't lose weight too fast, 1-2 lbs. a
> week.
>
> First find out exactly where you are now. How many pushups can
> you do and how many sit-ups. I would do all three at the same
> time. Do your pushups to max, then sit-ups, then run the two
> miles. If you run regularly you shouldn't have trouble with the
> sit-ups, so do the pushups first.
>
> I would want to have a cushion, so being able to do 85-90
> wouldn't hurt. I wouldn't raise my feet or add weight; it's
> about endurance.
>
> Start preparing for the test NOW. Stop all exercise at least a
> week before the test in May.
>
>
> locker


Thanks for the info. That's exactly the info I was looking for.
 
R

R. Gregg Reed

Guest
"L. Fine" <[email protected]> wrote in
news:[email protected]:

> I think you're overestimating the drain on your energy/endurance in
> doing these three 'events' back to back.


I did the PFT last May for the first time. For me, the pushups and situps
is definitly a drain.

> The Marine Corps PFT is 20
> pullups in 2 minutes, 80 situps in 2 minutes and a 3 mile run in 18
> minutes to get a perfect score. I was always a little slow on the run
> (about 22 minutes) but could bang out the pullups and situps beforehand
> and still be fired up for the run afterwards. The entire key to getting
> a perfect score is to be MOTIVATED (get used to hearing that if you're
> joining the Army). Whatever fires you up - whatever you can use to make
> you angry and determined, use it. Look at the pushups and situps as
> 'appetizers' to get the run - the 'main course'.
>
> As far as training, you should shoot to do at least 10-15% more reps
> than called for on the appetizer events in your practice sessions. I'm


Thanks. That's what I was looking for. More reps instead of harder reps.

> not sure they record what you do over and above the maximums (Marine
> Corps PFT just gives you 100 points for maxing each event, so a 300 is
> a perfect score).


Three hundred is a perfect score for the Army, too. A few pushups less than
80, a few situps less than 80, then 2 miles in 12:00 or less.

> Therefore, you may be wasting your time (and some
> energy) trying to do more than asked during the actual PFT, but it's
> certainly a good strategy for your training regimen to aim a little
> higher so that you're not likely to fall short.


We got a new First Sergeant in July. He's real big on the PFT. Our minimum
passing score is 180, but he wants the entire platoon to score at least
210. I figure I can impress him if I get a perfect score. It never hurts to
suck up to the First Sergeant. :)

>
> Bottom line though - find something that fires you up! Hoorah!
>