Asian Pesto

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Clay Irving, Dec 11, 2005.

  1. Clay Irving

    Clay Irving Guest

    I just made an "asian pesto" based an a recipe I got from _Asian Ingredients,
    A guide to the Foodstuffs of China, Japan, Korea, Thailand, and Vietnam_ by
    Bruce Cost. Wow! It is *really* good.

    1 1/2 cups Asian basil leaves, tighly packed -- I used Thai basil, bai horapha
    1/4 cup Asian mint leaves, tightly packed -- what's "Asian" mint?
    1/4 cup cilantro leaves, tightly packed
    1 cup peanut oil
    1/2 cup raw peanuts -- It takes some time to remove the peanuts from the
    shell and remove the papery skin
    2 small fresh green chiles -- I used 3 Thai prik ki nu, see:
    http://www.panix.com/~clay/cookbook/bin/show_ingredient.cgi?prik-ki-nu
    4 large garlic cloves
    1 1/2 teaspoon salt
    1 teaspoon sugar
    3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice -- I juiced a whole lemon

    Combine the herbs in a bowl and set aside.

    Heat oil in a small skill until nearly smoking, then remove from the heat
    and add the peanuts. Allow to sit until lightly browned. Remove the nuts
    with a slotted spoon and drain, reserving the oil.

    Put the peanuts in a food processor or blender and blend to a rough paste.
    Add the chiles, ginger, and garlic, and continue to blend. Add the herbs
    and a little of the reserved peanut oil, and continue to blend. Add the
    salt, sugar, and lemon juice, and blend until the herbs are very finely
    minced.

    Note: The peanuts, garlic, and ginger didn't mix well in the blender.
    After I added the herbs and some oil, everything mixed well.

    Did I say this pesto is *really* good?

    I have some fresh Chinese noodles I'm going to cook later today to serve
    with this pesto.

    For holiday spirit, I am currently enjoying a La Chouffe golden (Belgian)
    ale, that I've aged for a few years. See:

    http://www.achouffe.be/newen/produits.php

    Life is good.

    --
    Clay Irving <[email protected]>
    Never judge a book by its movie.
    - J.W. Eagan
     
    Tags:


  2. kevnbro

    kevnbro Guest

    Did you say "Asian pesto!?" Oh man, you are in trouble.
     
  3. Clay Irving

    Clay Irving Guest

    On 2005-12-11, kevnbro <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Did you say "Asian pesto!?" Oh man, you are in trouble.


    Yeah, but I also said, it is *really* good. :)

    --
    Clay Irving <[email protected]>
    To Err is human, to forgive is simply not our policy.
     
  4. kevnbro

    kevnbro Guest

    >Yeah, but I also said, it is *really* good. :)

    It does sound good and i'm going to save it but I think I hear the
    food police siren off in the distance... I think they're heading your
    way. Kev
     
  5. Clay Irving

    Clay Irving Guest

    On 2005-12-11, kevnbro <[email protected]> wrote:

    >>Yeah, but I also said, it is *really* good. :)


    > It does sound good and i'm going to save it but I think I hear the
    > food police siren off in the distance... I think they're heading your
    > way. Kev


    I'd better cook the noodles to make my case! :)

    --
    Clay Irving <[email protected]>
    "Take myself, subtract films, and the remainder is zero"
    - Akira Kurosawa
     
  6. King's Crown

    King's Crown Guest

    This sounds really good, but where would one get Asian basil leaves and
    Asian Mint?

    Lynne

    "Clay Irving" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >I just made an "asian pesto" based an a recipe I got from _Asian
    >Ingredients,
    > A guide to the Foodstuffs of China, Japan, Korea, Thailand, and Vietnam_
    > by
    > Bruce Cost. Wow! It is *really* good.
    >
    > 1 1/2 cups Asian basil leaves, tighly packed -- I used Thai basil, bai
    > horapha
    > 1/4 cup Asian mint leaves, tightly packed -- what's "Asian" mint?
    > 1/4 cup cilantro leaves, tightly packed
    > 1 cup peanut oil
    > 1/2 cup raw peanuts -- It takes some time to remove the peanuts from the
    > shell and remove the papery skin
    > 2 small fresh green chiles -- I used 3 Thai prik ki nu, see:
    >
    > http://www.panix.com/~clay/cookbook/bin/show_ingredient.cgi?prik-ki-nu
    > 4 large garlic cloves
    > 1 1/2 teaspoon salt
    > 1 teaspoon sugar
    > 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice -- I juiced a whole lemon
    >
    > Combine the herbs in a bowl and set aside.
    >
    > Heat oil in a small skill until nearly smoking, then remove from the heat
    > and add the peanuts. Allow to sit until lightly browned. Remove the nuts
    > with a slotted spoon and drain, reserving the oil.
    >
    > Put the peanuts in a food processor or blender and blend to a rough paste.
    > Add the chiles, ginger, and garlic, and continue to blend. Add the herbs
    > and a little of the reserved peanut oil, and continue to blend. Add the
    > salt, sugar, and lemon juice, and blend until the herbs are very finely
    > minced.
    >
    > Note: The peanuts, garlic, and ginger didn't mix well in the blender.
    > After I added the herbs and some oil, everything mixed well.
    >
    > Did I say this pesto is *really* good?
    >
    > I have some fresh Chinese noodles I'm going to cook later today to serve
    > with this pesto.
    >
    > For holiday spirit, I am currently enjoying a La Chouffe golden (Belgian)
    > ale, that I've aged for a few years. See:
    >
    > http://www.achouffe.be/newen/produits.php
    >
    > Life is good.
    >
    > --
    > Clay Irving <[email protected]>
    > Never judge a book by its movie.
    > - J.W. Eagan
     
  7. Clay Irving

    Clay Irving Guest

    On 2005-12-11, King's Crown <[email protected]> wrote:

    > This sounds really good, but where would one get Asian basil leaves and
    > Asian Mint?


    I was buying Thai basil at the Farmers market, but there was none this
    Saturday. Instead I went to 99 Ranch (a really good Asian grocery store) in
    the Los Angeles area:

    http://www.99ranch.com/Default.asp

    You can also buy it online:

    ImportFood.com
    http://importfood.com/thai_basil.html

    Temple of Thai
    http://www.templeofthai.com/food/fresh/

    GroceryThai.com
    http://grocerythai.com/catalog/product_info.php/cPath/33/products_id/203

    For the mint, I just used fresh mint from the supermarket.

    --
    Clay Irving <[email protected]>
    Life... is like a grapefruit. It's orange and squishy, and has a few pips
    in it, and some folks have half a one for breakfast.
    - Douglas Adams
     
  8. King's Crown

    King's Crown Guest

    Thanks for the tips.

    Lynne
    "Clay Irving" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On 2005-12-11, King's Crown <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> This sounds really good, but where would one get Asian basil leaves and
    >> Asian Mint?

    >
    > I was buying Thai basil at the Farmers market, but there was none this
    > Saturday. Instead I went to 99 Ranch (a really good Asian grocery store)
    > in
    > the Los Angeles area:
    >
    > http://www.99ranch.com/Default.asp
    >
    > You can also buy it online:
    >
    > ImportFood.com
    > http://importfood.com/thai_basil.html
    >
    > Temple of Thai
    > http://www.templeofthai.com/food/fresh/
    >
    > GroceryThai.com
    > http://grocerythai.com/catalog/product_info.php/cPath/33/products_id/203
    >
    > For the mint, I just used fresh mint from the supermarket.
    >
    > --
    > Clay Irving <[email protected]>
    > Life... is like a grapefruit. It's orange and squishy, and has a few pips
    > in it, and some folks have half a one for breakfast.
    > - Douglas Adams
     
  9. "Clay Irving" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On 2005-12-11, kevnbro <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Did you say "Asian pesto!?" Oh man, you are in trouble.

    >
    > Yeah, but I also said, it is *really* good. :)
    >
    > --
    > Clay Irving


    There is nothing wrong with the phrase "Asian Pesto". Pesti can include
    whatever you want. They are simply pastes. Without a modifier --- as you
    have given yours --- it is essentially meaningless. You might get an
    argument about mixing English and Italian, but not from this cop.

    Your Asian pesto looks fabulous to me!

    Charlie, part time food cop
     
  10. modom

    modom Guest

    On Mon, 12 Dec 2005 02:55:09 GMT, "Charles Gifford"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"Clay Irving" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    >> On 2005-12-11, kevnbro <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> > Did you say "Asian pesto!?" Oh man, you are in trouble.

    >>
    >> Yeah, but I also said, it is *really* good. :)
    >>
    >> --
    >> Clay Irving

    >
    >There is nothing wrong with the phrase "Asian Pesto". Pesti can include
    >whatever you want. They are simply pastes. Without a modifier --- as you
    >have given yours --- it is essentially meaningless. You might get an
    >argument about mixing English and Italian, but not from this cop.
    >
    >Your Asian pesto looks fabulous to me!
    >
    >Charlie, part time food cop
    >

    Yeah, it did, didn't it? Like a Thai variation on a cilantro pesto
    I've made with pecans and garlic and poblanos and lime juice and olive
    oil.


    modom
     
  11. Clay wrote:

    > I just made an "asian pesto" based an a recipe I got from _Asian
    > Ingredients, A guide to the Foodstuffs of China, Japan, Korea, Thailand,
    > and Vietnam_ by Bruce Cost. Wow! It is *really* good.
    >
    > 1 1/2 cups Asian basil leaves, tighly packed -- I used Thai basil, bai
    > horapha
    > 1/4 cup Asian mint leaves, tightly packed -- what's "Asian" mint?
    > 1/4 cup cilantro leaves, tightly packed
    > 1 cup peanut oil
    > 1/2 cup raw peanuts -- It takes some time to remove the peanuts from the
    > shell and remove the papery skin
    > 2 small fresh green chiles -- I used 3 Thai prik ki nu, see:
    >
    > http://www.panix.com/~clay/cookbook/bin/show_ingredient.cgi?prik-ki-nu
    > 4 large garlic cloves
    > 1 1/2 teaspoon salt
    > 1 teaspoon sugar
    > 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice -- I juiced a whole lemon
    >
    > Combine the herbs in a bowl and set aside.
    >
    > Heat oil in a small skill until nearly smoking, then remove from the heat
    > and add the peanuts. Allow to sit until lightly browned. Remove the nuts
    > with a slotted spoon and drain, reserving the oil.
    >
    > Put the peanuts in a food processor or blender and blend to a rough paste.
    > Add the chiles, ginger, and garlic, and continue to blend. Add the herbs
    > and a little of the reserved peanut oil, and continue to blend. Add the
    > salt, sugar, and lemon juice, and blend until the herbs are very finely
    > minced.
    >
    > Note: The peanuts, garlic, and ginger didn't mix well in the blender.
    > After I added the herbs and some oil, everything mixed well.
    >
    > Did I say this pesto is *really* good?
    >
    > I have some fresh Chinese noodles I'm going to cook later today to serve
    > with this pesto.



    It does sound good, but it would take me FOREVER to work my way through a
    quart of pesto, Asian or otherwise! And I'm guessing it probably doesn't
    keep all that well, either.

    Got me speculating, though: I wonder how it would be with macadamia nuts and
    oil in place of the peanuts and peanut oil.

    Bob
     
  12. The Bubbo

    The Bubbo Guest

    Bob Terwilliger wrote:
    > Clay wrote:
    >
    >> I just made an "asian pesto" based an a recipe I got from _Asian
    >> Ingredients, A guide to the Foodstuffs of China, Japan, Korea, Thailand,
    >> and Vietnam_ by Bruce Cost. Wow! It is *really* good.
    >>
    >> 1 1/2 cups Asian basil leaves, tighly packed -- I used Thai basil, bai
    >> horapha
    >> 1/4 cup Asian mint leaves, tightly packed -- what's "Asian" mint?
    >> 1/4 cup cilantro leaves, tightly packed
    >> 1 cup peanut oil
    >> 1/2 cup raw peanuts -- It takes some time to remove the peanuts from the
    >> shell and remove the papery skin
    >> 2 small fresh green chiles -- I used 3 Thai prik ki nu, see:
    >>
    >> http://www.panix.com/~clay/cookbook/bin/show_ingredient.cgi?prik-ki-nu
    >> 4 large garlic cloves
    >> 1 1/2 teaspoon salt
    >> 1 teaspoon sugar
    >> 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice -- I juiced a whole lemon
    >>
    >> Combine the herbs in a bowl and set aside.
    >>
    >> Heat oil in a small skill until nearly smoking, then remove from the heat
    >> and add the peanuts. Allow to sit until lightly browned. Remove the nuts
    >> with a slotted spoon and drain, reserving the oil.
    >>
    >> Put the peanuts in a food processor or blender and blend to a rough paste.
    >> Add the chiles, ginger, and garlic, and continue to blend. Add the herbs
    >> and a little of the reserved peanut oil, and continue to blend. Add the
    >> salt, sugar, and lemon juice, and blend until the herbs are very finely
    >> minced.
    >>
    >> Note: The peanuts, garlic, and ginger didn't mix well in the blender.
    >> After I added the herbs and some oil, everything mixed well.
    >>
    >> Did I say this pesto is *really* good?
    >>
    >> I have some fresh Chinese noodles I'm going to cook later today to serve
    >> with this pesto.

    >
    >
    > It does sound good, but it would take me FOREVER to work my way through a
    > quart of pesto, Asian or otherwise! And I'm guessing it probably doesn't
    > keep all that well, either.
    >
    > Got me speculating, though: I wonder how it would be with macadamia nuts and
    > oil in place of the peanuts and peanut oil.
    >
    > Bob
    >
    >


    I think you should be able to freeze it in portions and then use it as you
    need it. I've done that with pesto before.

    --
    ..:Heather:.
    www.velvet-c.com
     
  13. The Ranger

    The Ranger Guest

    On 11 Dec 2005 22:17:02 -0600, "Bob Terwilliger"
    <[email protected]_spammer.biz> replied:

    >Clay wrote:
    >
    >> I just made an "asian pesto" based an a recipe I got from _Asian
    >> Ingredients, A guide to the Foodstuffs of China, Japan, Korea, Thailand,
    >> and Vietnam_ by Bruce Cost. Wow! It is *really* good.
    >>
    >> 1 1/2 cups Asian basil leaves, tighly packed -- I used Thai basil, bai
    >> horapha
    >> 1/4 cup Asian mint leaves, tightly packed -- what's "Asian" mint?
    >> 1/4 cup cilantro leaves, tightly packed
    >> 1 cup peanut oil
    >> 1/2 cup raw peanuts -- It takes some time to remove the peanuts from the
    >> shell and remove the papery skin
    >> 2 small fresh green chiles -- I used 3 Thai prik ki nu, see:
    >>
    >> http://www.panix.com/~clay/cookbook/bin/show_ingredient.cgi?prik-ki-nu
    >> 4 large garlic cloves
    >> 1 1/2 teaspoon salt
    >> 1 teaspoon sugar
    >> 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice -- I juiced a whole lemon
    >>
    >> Combine the herbs in a bowl and set aside.
    >>
    >> Heat oil in a small skill until nearly smoking, then remove from the heat
    >> and add the peanuts. Allow to sit until lightly browned. Remove the nuts
    >> with a slotted spoon and drain, reserving the oil.
    >>
    >> Put the peanuts in a food processor or blender and blend to a rough paste.
    >> Add the chiles, ginger, and garlic, and continue to blend. Add the herbs
    >> and a little of the reserved peanut oil, and continue to blend. Add the
    >> salt, sugar, and lemon juice, and blend until the herbs are very finely
    >> minced.
    >>
    >> Note: The peanuts, garlic, and ginger didn't mix well in the blender.
    >> After I added the herbs and some oil, everything mixed well.
    >>
    >> Did I say this pesto is *really* good?
    >>
    >> I have some fresh Chinese noodles I'm going to cook later today to serve
    >> with this pesto.

    >
    >
    >It does sound good, but it would take me FOREVER to work my way through a
    >quart of pesto, Asian or otherwise! And I'm guessing it probably doesn't
    >keep all that well, either.
    >
    >Got me speculating, though: I wonder how it would be with macadamia nuts and
    >oil in place of the peanuts and peanut oil.
    >

    Good enough to experiment with perhaps?

    The Ranger
     
  14. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On Sun, 11 Dec 2005 21:50:05 +0000 (UTC), Clay Irving
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I just made an "asian pesto" based an a recipe I got from _Asian Ingredients,
    >A guide to the Foodstuffs of China, Japan, Korea, Thailand, and Vietnam_ by
    >Bruce Cost. Wow! It is *really* good.


    That's an excellent book for asian ingredients and recipes. Not
    as comprehensive as Charmain Solomon's, but still highly
    recommended.

    -sw
     
  15. Shaun aRe

    Shaun aRe Guest

    "Clay Irving" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I just made an "asian pesto"
    >


    You CANNOT call that a PESTO!

    It is, QUITE *obviously*, a basil, mint, cilantro, peanut, green chile,
    garlic, salt, sugar and lemon juice *MARTINI*!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!









    Sheesh...

    Shaun aRe
     
  16. Laura\(wow\)

    Laura\(wow\) Guest

    lol a basil, mint, cilantro, peanut, green chili, garlic, salt, sugar and
    lemon juice martini. lol , But what if it is drunk with a straw??

    --

    LAURA


    "Shaun aRe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Clay Irving" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> I just made an "asian pesto"
    >>

    >
    > You CANNOT call that a PESTO!
    >
    > It is, QUITE *obviously*, a basil, mint, cilantro, peanut, green chile,
    > garlic, salt, sugar and lemon juice *MARTINI*!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > Sheesh...
    >
    > Shaun aRe
    >
    >
     
  17. Shaun aRe

    Shaun aRe Guest

    "Laura(wow)" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > lol a basil, mint, cilantro, peanut, green chili, garlic, salt, sugar and
    > lemon juice martini. lol , But what if it is drunk with a straw??


    Soda pop ',;~}~






    Shaun aRe
     
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