Asian Pesto



C

Clay Irving

Guest
I just made an "asian pesto" based an a recipe I got from _Asian Ingredients,
A guide to the Foodstuffs of China, Japan, Korea, Thailand, and Vietnam_ by
Bruce Cost. Wow! It is *really* good.

1 1/2 cups Asian basil leaves, tighly packed -- I used Thai basil, bai horapha
1/4 cup Asian mint leaves, tightly packed -- what's "Asian" mint?
1/4 cup cilantro leaves, tightly packed
1 cup peanut oil
1/2 cup raw peanuts -- It takes some time to remove the peanuts from the
shell and remove the papery skin
2 small fresh green chiles -- I used 3 Thai prik ki nu, see:
http://www.panix.com/~clay/cookbook/bin/show_ingredient.cgi?prik-ki-nu
4 large garlic cloves
1 1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon sugar
3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice -- I juiced a whole lemon

Combine the herbs in a bowl and set aside.

Heat oil in a small skill until nearly smoking, then remove from the heat
and add the peanuts. Allow to sit until lightly browned. Remove the nuts
with a slotted spoon and drain, reserving the oil.

Put the peanuts in a food processor or blender and blend to a rough paste.
Add the chiles, ginger, and garlic, and continue to blend. Add the herbs
and a little of the reserved peanut oil, and continue to blend. Add the
salt, sugar, and lemon juice, and blend until the herbs are very finely
minced.

Note: The peanuts, garlic, and ginger didn't mix well in the blender.
After I added the herbs and some oil, everything mixed well.

Did I say this pesto is *really* good?

I have some fresh Chinese noodles I'm going to cook later today to serve
with this pesto.

For holiday spirit, I am currently enjoying a La Chouffe golden (Belgian)
ale, that I've aged for a few years. See:

http://www.achouffe.be/newen/produits.php

Life is good.

--
Clay Irving <[email protected]>
Never judge a book by its movie.
- J.W. Eagan
 
C

Clay Irving

Guest
On 2005-12-11, kevnbro <[email protected]> wrote:

> Did you say "Asian pesto!?" Oh man, you are in trouble.


Yeah, but I also said, it is *really* good. :)

--
Clay Irving <[email protected]>
To Err is human, to forgive is simply not our policy.
 
K

kevnbro

Guest
>Yeah, but I also said, it is *really* good. :)

It does sound good and i'm going to save it but I think I hear the
food police siren off in the distance... I think they're heading your
way. Kev
 
C

Clay Irving

Guest
On 2005-12-11, kevnbro <[email protected]> wrote:

>>Yeah, but I also said, it is *really* good. :)


> It does sound good and i'm going to save it but I think I hear the
> food police siren off in the distance... I think they're heading your
> way. Kev


I'd better cook the noodles to make my case! :)

--
Clay Irving <[email protected]>
"Take myself, subtract films, and the remainder is zero"
- Akira Kurosawa
 
K

King's Crown

Guest
This sounds really good, but where would one get Asian basil leaves and
Asian Mint?

Lynne

"Clay Irving" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>I just made an "asian pesto" based an a recipe I got from _Asian
>Ingredients,
> A guide to the Foodstuffs of China, Japan, Korea, Thailand, and Vietnam_
> by
> Bruce Cost. Wow! It is *really* good.
>
> 1 1/2 cups Asian basil leaves, tighly packed -- I used Thai basil, bai
> horapha
> 1/4 cup Asian mint leaves, tightly packed -- what's "Asian" mint?
> 1/4 cup cilantro leaves, tightly packed
> 1 cup peanut oil
> 1/2 cup raw peanuts -- It takes some time to remove the peanuts from the
> shell and remove the papery skin
> 2 small fresh green chiles -- I used 3 Thai prik ki nu, see:
>
> http://www.panix.com/~clay/cookbook/bin/show_ingredient.cgi?prik-ki-nu
> 4 large garlic cloves
> 1 1/2 teaspoon salt
> 1 teaspoon sugar
> 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice -- I juiced a whole lemon
>
> Combine the herbs in a bowl and set aside.
>
> Heat oil in a small skill until nearly smoking, then remove from the heat
> and add the peanuts. Allow to sit until lightly browned. Remove the nuts
> with a slotted spoon and drain, reserving the oil.
>
> Put the peanuts in a food processor or blender and blend to a rough paste.
> Add the chiles, ginger, and garlic, and continue to blend. Add the herbs
> and a little of the reserved peanut oil, and continue to blend. Add the
> salt, sugar, and lemon juice, and blend until the herbs are very finely
> minced.
>
> Note: The peanuts, garlic, and ginger didn't mix well in the blender.
> After I added the herbs and some oil, everything mixed well.
>
> Did I say this pesto is *really* good?
>
> I have some fresh Chinese noodles I'm going to cook later today to serve
> with this pesto.
>
> For holiday spirit, I am currently enjoying a La Chouffe golden (Belgian)
> ale, that I've aged for a few years. See:
>
> http://www.achouffe.be/newen/produits.php
>
> Life is good.
>
> --
> Clay Irving <[email protected]>
> Never judge a book by its movie.
> - J.W. Eagan
 
C

Clay Irving

Guest
On 2005-12-11, King's Crown <[email protected]> wrote:

> This sounds really good, but where would one get Asian basil leaves and
> Asian Mint?


I was buying Thai basil at the Farmers market, but there was none this
Saturday. Instead I went to 99 Ranch (a really good Asian grocery store) in
the Los Angeles area:

http://www.99ranch.com/Default.asp

You can also buy it online:

ImportFood.com
http://importfood.com/thai_basil.html

Temple of Thai
http://www.templeofthai.com/food/fresh/

GroceryThai.com
http://grocerythai.com/catalog/product_info.php/cPath/33/products_id/203

For the mint, I just used fresh mint from the supermarket.

--
Clay Irving <[email protected]>
Life... is like a grapefruit. It's orange and squishy, and has a few pips
in it, and some folks have half a one for breakfast.
- Douglas Adams
 
K

King's Crown

Guest
Thanks for the tips.

Lynne
"Clay Irving" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> On 2005-12-11, King's Crown <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>> This sounds really good, but where would one get Asian basil leaves and
>> Asian Mint?

>
> I was buying Thai basil at the Farmers market, but there was none this
> Saturday. Instead I went to 99 Ranch (a really good Asian grocery store)
> in
> the Los Angeles area:
>
> http://www.99ranch.com/Default.asp
>
> You can also buy it online:
>
> ImportFood.com
> http://importfood.com/thai_basil.html
>
> Temple of Thai
> http://www.templeofthai.com/food/fresh/
>
> GroceryThai.com
> http://grocerythai.com/catalog/product_info.php/cPath/33/products_id/203
>
> For the mint, I just used fresh mint from the supermarket.
>
> --
> Clay Irving <[email protected]>
> Life... is like a grapefruit. It's orange and squishy, and has a few pips
> in it, and some folks have half a one for breakfast.
> - Douglas Adams
 
C

Charles Gifford

Guest
"Clay Irving" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> On 2005-12-11, kevnbro <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> > Did you say "Asian pesto!?" Oh man, you are in trouble.

>
> Yeah, but I also said, it is *really* good. :)
>
> --
> Clay Irving


There is nothing wrong with the phrase "Asian Pesto". Pesti can include
whatever you want. They are simply pastes. Without a modifier --- as you
have given yours --- it is essentially meaningless. You might get an
argument about mixing English and Italian, but not from this cop.

Your Asian pesto looks fabulous to me!

Charlie, part time food cop
 
M

modom

Guest
On Mon, 12 Dec 2005 02:55:09 GMT, "Charles Gifford"
<[email protected]> wrote:

>
>"Clay Irving" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>news:[email protected]
>> On 2005-12-11, kevnbro <[email protected]> wrote:
>>
>> > Did you say "Asian pesto!?" Oh man, you are in trouble.

>>
>> Yeah, but I also said, it is *really* good. :)
>>
>> --
>> Clay Irving

>
>There is nothing wrong with the phrase "Asian Pesto". Pesti can include
>whatever you want. They are simply pastes. Without a modifier --- as you
>have given yours --- it is essentially meaningless. You might get an
>argument about mixing English and Italian, but not from this cop.
>
>Your Asian pesto looks fabulous to me!
>
>Charlie, part time food cop
>

Yeah, it did, didn't it? Like a Thai variation on a cilantro pesto
I've made with pecans and garlic and poblanos and lime juice and olive
oil.


modom
 
B

Bob Terwilliger

Guest
Clay wrote:

> I just made an "asian pesto" based an a recipe I got from _Asian
> Ingredients, A guide to the Foodstuffs of China, Japan, Korea, Thailand,
> and Vietnam_ by Bruce Cost. Wow! It is *really* good.
>
> 1 1/2 cups Asian basil leaves, tighly packed -- I used Thai basil, bai
> horapha
> 1/4 cup Asian mint leaves, tightly packed -- what's "Asian" mint?
> 1/4 cup cilantro leaves, tightly packed
> 1 cup peanut oil
> 1/2 cup raw peanuts -- It takes some time to remove the peanuts from the
> shell and remove the papery skin
> 2 small fresh green chiles -- I used 3 Thai prik ki nu, see:
>
> http://www.panix.com/~clay/cookbook/bin/show_ingredient.cgi?prik-ki-nu
> 4 large garlic cloves
> 1 1/2 teaspoon salt
> 1 teaspoon sugar
> 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice -- I juiced a whole lemon
>
> Combine the herbs in a bowl and set aside.
>
> Heat oil in a small skill until nearly smoking, then remove from the heat
> and add the peanuts. Allow to sit until lightly browned. Remove the nuts
> with a slotted spoon and drain, reserving the oil.
>
> Put the peanuts in a food processor or blender and blend to a rough paste.
> Add the chiles, ginger, and garlic, and continue to blend. Add the herbs
> and a little of the reserved peanut oil, and continue to blend. Add the
> salt, sugar, and lemon juice, and blend until the herbs are very finely
> minced.
>
> Note: The peanuts, garlic, and ginger didn't mix well in the blender.
> After I added the herbs and some oil, everything mixed well.
>
> Did I say this pesto is *really* good?
>
> I have some fresh Chinese noodles I'm going to cook later today to serve
> with this pesto.



It does sound good, but it would take me FOREVER to work my way through a
quart of pesto, Asian or otherwise! And I'm guessing it probably doesn't
keep all that well, either.

Got me speculating, though: I wonder how it would be with macadamia nuts and
oil in place of the peanuts and peanut oil.

Bob
 
T

The Bubbo

Guest
Bob Terwilliger wrote:
> Clay wrote:
>
>> I just made an "asian pesto" based an a recipe I got from _Asian
>> Ingredients, A guide to the Foodstuffs of China, Japan, Korea, Thailand,
>> and Vietnam_ by Bruce Cost. Wow! It is *really* good.
>>
>> 1 1/2 cups Asian basil leaves, tighly packed -- I used Thai basil, bai
>> horapha
>> 1/4 cup Asian mint leaves, tightly packed -- what's "Asian" mint?
>> 1/4 cup cilantro leaves, tightly packed
>> 1 cup peanut oil
>> 1/2 cup raw peanuts -- It takes some time to remove the peanuts from the
>> shell and remove the papery skin
>> 2 small fresh green chiles -- I used 3 Thai prik ki nu, see:
>>
>> http://www.panix.com/~clay/cookbook/bin/show_ingredient.cgi?prik-ki-nu
>> 4 large garlic cloves
>> 1 1/2 teaspoon salt
>> 1 teaspoon sugar
>> 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice -- I juiced a whole lemon
>>
>> Combine the herbs in a bowl and set aside.
>>
>> Heat oil in a small skill until nearly smoking, then remove from the heat
>> and add the peanuts. Allow to sit until lightly browned. Remove the nuts
>> with a slotted spoon and drain, reserving the oil.
>>
>> Put the peanuts in a food processor or blender and blend to a rough paste.
>> Add the chiles, ginger, and garlic, and continue to blend. Add the herbs
>> and a little of the reserved peanut oil, and continue to blend. Add the
>> salt, sugar, and lemon juice, and blend until the herbs are very finely
>> minced.
>>
>> Note: The peanuts, garlic, and ginger didn't mix well in the blender.
>> After I added the herbs and some oil, everything mixed well.
>>
>> Did I say this pesto is *really* good?
>>
>> I have some fresh Chinese noodles I'm going to cook later today to serve
>> with this pesto.

>
>
> It does sound good, but it would take me FOREVER to work my way through a
> quart of pesto, Asian or otherwise! And I'm guessing it probably doesn't
> keep all that well, either.
>
> Got me speculating, though: I wonder how it would be with macadamia nuts and
> oil in place of the peanuts and peanut oil.
>
> Bob
>
>


I think you should be able to freeze it in portions and then use it as you
need it. I've done that with pesto before.

--
..:Heather:.
www.velvet-c.com
 
T

The Ranger

Guest
On 11 Dec 2005 22:17:02 -0600, "Bob Terwilliger"
<[email protected]_spammer.biz> replied:

>Clay wrote:
>
>> I just made an "asian pesto" based an a recipe I got from _Asian
>> Ingredients, A guide to the Foodstuffs of China, Japan, Korea, Thailand,
>> and Vietnam_ by Bruce Cost. Wow! It is *really* good.
>>
>> 1 1/2 cups Asian basil leaves, tighly packed -- I used Thai basil, bai
>> horapha
>> 1/4 cup Asian mint leaves, tightly packed -- what's "Asian" mint?
>> 1/4 cup cilantro leaves, tightly packed
>> 1 cup peanut oil
>> 1/2 cup raw peanuts -- It takes some time to remove the peanuts from the
>> shell and remove the papery skin
>> 2 small fresh green chiles -- I used 3 Thai prik ki nu, see:
>>
>> http://www.panix.com/~clay/cookbook/bin/show_ingredient.cgi?prik-ki-nu
>> 4 large garlic cloves
>> 1 1/2 teaspoon salt
>> 1 teaspoon sugar
>> 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice -- I juiced a whole lemon
>>
>> Combine the herbs in a bowl and set aside.
>>
>> Heat oil in a small skill until nearly smoking, then remove from the heat
>> and add the peanuts. Allow to sit until lightly browned. Remove the nuts
>> with a slotted spoon and drain, reserving the oil.
>>
>> Put the peanuts in a food processor or blender and blend to a rough paste.
>> Add the chiles, ginger, and garlic, and continue to blend. Add the herbs
>> and a little of the reserved peanut oil, and continue to blend. Add the
>> salt, sugar, and lemon juice, and blend until the herbs are very finely
>> minced.
>>
>> Note: The peanuts, garlic, and ginger didn't mix well in the blender.
>> After I added the herbs and some oil, everything mixed well.
>>
>> Did I say this pesto is *really* good?
>>
>> I have some fresh Chinese noodles I'm going to cook later today to serve
>> with this pesto.

>
>
>It does sound good, but it would take me FOREVER to work my way through a
>quart of pesto, Asian or otherwise! And I'm guessing it probably doesn't
>keep all that well, either.
>
>Got me speculating, though: I wonder how it would be with macadamia nuts and
>oil in place of the peanuts and peanut oil.
>

Good enough to experiment with perhaps?

The Ranger
 
S

Steve Wertz

Guest
On Sun, 11 Dec 2005 21:50:05 +0000 (UTC), Clay Irving
<[email protected]> wrote:

>I just made an "asian pesto" based an a recipe I got from _Asian Ingredients,
>A guide to the Foodstuffs of China, Japan, Korea, Thailand, and Vietnam_ by
>Bruce Cost. Wow! It is *really* good.


That's an excellent book for asian ingredients and recipes. Not
as comprehensive as Charmain Solomon's, but still highly
recommended.

-sw
 
S

Shaun aRe

Guest
"Clay Irving" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> I just made an "asian pesto"
>


You CANNOT call that a PESTO!

It is, QUITE *obviously*, a basil, mint, cilantro, peanut, green chile,
garlic, salt, sugar and lemon juice *MARTINI*!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!









Sheesh...

Shaun aRe
 
L

Laura\(wow\)

Guest
lol a basil, mint, cilantro, peanut, green chili, garlic, salt, sugar and
lemon juice martini. lol , But what if it is drunk with a straw??

--

LAURA


"Shaun aRe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> "Clay Irving" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>> I just made an "asian pesto"
>>

>
> You CANNOT call that a PESTO!
>
> It is, QUITE *obviously*, a basil, mint, cilantro, peanut, green chile,
> garlic, salt, sugar and lemon juice *MARTINI*!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Sheesh...
>
> Shaun aRe
>
>
 
S

Shaun aRe

Guest
"Laura(wow)" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> lol a basil, mint, cilantro, peanut, green chili, garlic, salt, sugar and
> lemon juice martini. lol , But what if it is drunk with a straw??


Soda pop ',;~}~






Shaun aRe