Asking suggestions

Discussion in 'Women's Cycling' started by elladp, Jul 22, 2020.

  1. elladp

    elladp New Member

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    Which riding cycle is best for women's?
     
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  2. dabac

    dabac Well-Known Member

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    Well, how do you intend to ride?
    Utility, fitness?
    Good roads, poor roads, no roads?

    How much money are you willing to spend?
    Do you have a safe place to store it?
    How tall are you?
     
  3. elladp

    elladp New Member

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    my height is 5.5' and yes i have safe place to store it. I am looking for fitness with poor road
     
  4. dabac

    dabac Well-Known Member

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    If you are OK with drop bar bikes, you can look for Cyclo-Cross (CX) bikes or the latest invention - gravel bikes. These will give the most speed per effort on poor roads.
    If you don’t want a drop bar, look for hybrid bicycles. Preferably ones with rigid - NOT suspension - forks. For poor roads, check that it can take at least 40 mm wide tires.
     
  5. dabac

    dabac Well-Known Member

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    That puts you in the ”medium” size range. Or 52 cm in that sizing system.
    For people who are regular riders, test rides can be very helpful in determining if you’ll like a bike or not.
    If you’re very new to riding, it’ll be difficult to judge if the fit is actually wrong for you or you’re merely unused to it.
     
  6. elladp

    elladp New Member

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    Thank you so much for your valuable suggestion.
     
  7. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    you did say poor roads, but you didn't say how much you want to spend. If you're going to be spending under $800 stay away from front suspension forks, they are cheaply made, which means they will break and they won't respond well to road conditions; they also will take your forward pedaling energy as the fork absorbs some of that as does the very heavy nature of cheap suspension forks. When those forks break it will cost more to get a new fork then it did to buy the bike!
     
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