assembling a bike



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Vincent Chiao

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hello, i have decided to put together a road bike completely from scratch--partly to save a bit of
money, but mostly just to see how it's done. i was wondering if anybody knows of any good resources
that give step by step instructions on this; i've found instructions for lots of isolated
parts--installing and adjusting derailleurs, putting in the headset, etc., but am looking for
something which might cover the process as a whole--perhaps with a recommended order for installing
the parts. any suggestions? thanks!
v.
 
H

Harris

Guest
"vincent chiao" wrote:
> hello, i have decided to put together a road bike completely from scratch--partly to save a bit of
> money, but mostly just to see how it's done. i was wondering if anybody knows of any good
> resources that give
step
> by step instructions on this; i've found instructions for lots of isolated parts--installing and
> adjusting derailleurs, putting in the headset, etc., but am looking for something which might
> cover the process as a whole--perhaps with a recommended order for installing the parts. any
> suggestions? thanks!

This is the order of assembly I use:

Headset Wheels Stem/Handlebars Seatpost/Saddle Bottom Bracket Cranks Pedals Brakes Deraileurs Chain
STI levers Cables

Art Harris
 
T

Tony Raven

Guest
In news:[email protected], vincent chiao <[email protected]> typed:
> hello, i have decided to put together a road bike completely from scratch--partly to save a bit of
> money, but mostly just to see how it's done.

It won't be cheaper if you are buying all the parts but it is satisfying. I generally do forks
first, then BB, handlebars, gears & brakes, wheels, seatpost but the order, other than what logic
dictates, is not critical. I've not come across a complete guide, not that I've looked, but there is
plenty on the web about each particular step.

Enjoy

Tony

--
http://www.raven-family.com

"All truth goes through three steps: First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed.
Finally, it is accepted as self-evident." Arthur Schopenhauer
 
A

Ari

Guest
zinn and the art of road bike maintenance is a good guide to own:
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1884737706/ref=lib_dp_sp_1/102
-6634984-9686565?v=glance&s=books&vi=slide-show#reader-link

that amazon link has 15 sample pages

"vincent chiao" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> hello, i have decided to put together a road bike completely from scratch--partly to save a bit of
> money, but mostly just to see how it's done. i was wondering if anybody knows of any good
> resources that give
step
> by step instructions on this; i've found instructions for lots of isolated parts--installing and
> adjusting derailleurs, putting in the headset, etc., but am looking for something which might
> cover the process as a whole--perhaps with a recommended order for installing the parts. any
> suggestions? thanks!
> v.
 

DiabloScott

New Member
May 15, 2003
2,284
4
38
Originally posted by Tony Raven
It won't be cheaper if you are buying all the parts but it is satisfying.

Sorry Tony but it absolutely CAN be cheaper if you have the patience and motivation to do it right. I took 5 months to build up my frame with all new parts, waiting for LBS sales or great buys from e-bay and I wound up with about $4k worth of bike and accessories for $2300. I have the spreadsheet to document this.

Good luck Vincent - it IS a satisfying journey.
 
J

Jim Edgar

Guest
vincent chiao at [email protected] wrote on 6/7/03 4:51 AM:
> hello, i have decided to put together a road bike completely from scratch--partly to save a bit of
> money, but mostly just to see how it's done. i was wondering if anybody knows of any good
> resources that give step by step instructions on this; i've found instructions for lots of
> isolated parts--installing and adjusting derailleurs, putting in the headset, etc., but am looking
> for something which might cover the process as a whole--perhaps with a recommended order for
> installing the parts. any suggestions? thanks!

A quality workstand is a very good thing. Or at least some method of stabilizing the frame
whle working.

I'd begin by greasing and installing the seatpost, then clamping the post into the workstand.

After that.... innards to outards.... (as others have said)

Headset fork BB crankset wheels brakes shifty bits chain cables saddle
 
C

Chris Zacho "Th

Guest
DiabloScott wrote:

"Sorry Tony but it absolutely CAN be cheaper if you have the patience and motivation to do it right.
I took 5 months to build up my frame with all new parts, waiting for LBS sales or great buys from
e-bay and I wound up with about $4k worth of bike and accessories for $2300. I have the spreadsheet
to document this.

Good luck Vincent - it IS a satisfying journey. "

Not only cheaper, but you'll end up with EXACTLY what you want, not the stock manufacturers
choise of what they think you should have. And, of course, it's a lot cheaper than going to a
custom bike maker.

Plus, not only is it more satisfying, but you'll know your machine intimately, how everything goes
together and works. Saves a lot on future repair bills.

May you have the wind at your back. And a really low gear for the hills! Chris

Chris'Z Corner "The Website for the Common Bicyclist": http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
 
A

Andy Dingley

Guest
On 8 Jun 2003 16:00:23 +0950, DiabloScott <[email protected]> wrote:

>Sorry Tony but it absolutely CAN be cheaper if you have the patience and motivation to do it right.

_can_ be, but it's unlikely to. It's how I like to do it too, but I long ago stopped kidding myself
that I was doing it to save money. If you happen across a really good deal on something big, like a
frame or a whole groupset, then it's worth going for.

Last bike I built, I very nearly bought a complete bike (local bargain offer with good parts on a
nasty frame) and stripped it for parts because it was going to cost me less than buying them
separately. Bulk manufacturers get a huge discount, compared to what I can buy at. This is mainly an
issue for mid-range mass-market MTBs - if you're building a high-end roadie, then assembling from
scratch carries less of a premium.
 
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