Asthma

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Ozarkmtbr, Apr 29, 2003.

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  1. Ozarkmtbr

    Ozarkmtbr Guest

    I was wondering if any of you gents or gals have exercise induced asthma? I have come to the
    conclusion that I may be suffering from this ailment. I have yet to seek medical help on it, but am
    near that point. Before I do, I was wanting to check my symptoms. I feel it in a sprint or a climb.
    It is as if I can't get air into my lungs fast enough. I have had this problem for several years and
    always though I needed to train more. Lately I have hit a wall, no matter how much more I train it
    continues to plague me. I mentioned it to my doctor once before but he knows the guys I ride with
    and said we ride too fast (jokingly). I only recently found out about exercise induced asthma and it
    seems to match.

    Ozark "gasp-wheeeez" Mtbr
     
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  2. OzarkMtbr wrote:
    > I was wondering if any of you gents or gals have exercise induced asthma? I have come to the
    > conclusion that I may be suffering from this ailment. I have yet to seek medical help on it, but
    > am near that point. Before I do, I was wanting to check my symptoms. I feel it in a sprint or a
    > climb. It is as if I can't get air into my lungs fast enough. I have had this problem for several
    > years and always though I needed to train more. Lately I have hit a wall, no matter how much more
    > I train it continues to plague me. I mentioned it to my doctor once before but he knows the guys I
    > ride with and said we ride too fast (jokingly). I only recently found out about exercise induced
    > asthma and it seems to match.
    >
    > Ozark "gasp-wheeeez" Mtbr

    Ooh! ooh! me me me!

    Definitely have it. EIA follows a pattern, in like 95% of the cases - it kind of builds up for a
    while, usually about 20 minutes after you start really exercising, then you can't breathe at all
    (your lungs burn usually too, and you wheeze, it just feels like you're suffocating... 'cause you
    are). This hits for like 2 or 3 minutes, then it slowly goes away, then ramps back up to a full or
    near-full attack a couple more times. Then it fades, and you're pretty much asthma free for a couple
    hours or so. I have an inhaler, but what I've noticed is it just seems to prolong the time before I
    get a full blown attack, and makes the symptoms less, but last longer. I personally prefer to just
    get the damn thing over with, and then I'm fine.

    Its not ideal, because your muscles are still oxygen deprived for a good amount of time while you're
    still having attacks, but its better than having not-full-on but still plenty nasty symptoms for
    twice the time.

    Sprinting or hill climbing are definitely triggers, because you use your lungs a lot more, but
    unless you feel like you literally can't pull air into your lungs, or that you can't breathe deeply,
    its probably a matter of lung capacity, and its somewhat trainable, although difficult.

    Have your doc refer you to somebody who specializes in asthma, they'll do some tests and see
    whats going on.

    Jon Bond
     
  3. Brian Novak

    Brian Novak Guest

    I've been mt.biking for about 6 years now. For the past couple of years I noticed I would kinda of
    weez after a strenous ride. Last year I was riding at Walker Ranch here in Boulder on a hot and very
    dry day and found that I could barely breath when I was in the middle of a difficult
    climb. My lungs tightened up and I had to stop riding for a couple of minutes. It was weird. I asked
    my doc about it and he concluded that I had EIA. He wrote a prescrition for an inhaler which
    I only use before rides and now things are great. I no longer have shortness of breath or
    weezing after rides. I highly recommend going to your docter. You will leave your friends in
    the dust on climbs again.

    Incidentally, I'm also a type 1 diabetic....

    ride on.

    -B
     
  4. Bomba

    Bomba Guest

    OzarkMtbr wrote:
    > I was wondering if any of you gents or gals have exercise induced asthma?

    Yep.

    I
    > have come to the conclusion that I may be suffering from this ailment. I have yet to seek medical
    > help on it, but am near that point. Before I do, I was wanting to check my symptoms. I feel it in
    > a sprint or a climb. It is as if I can't get air into my lungs fast enough. I have had this
    > problem for several years and always though I needed to train more. Lately I have hit a wall, no
    > matter how much more I train it continues to plague me.

    This could still be caused by exertion. Everybody has their limits, which will be most felt on a
    sprint or climb. It could well be that you've reached your peak. Even when I've not got asthma, I
    still get the feeling of being heavily out of breath, but there's a big difference between maximum
    lung capacity and EIA.

    EIA is a completely different feeling that comes in a range of severities. Asthma is caused by
    irritation to the bronchi and in the case of EIA, the stimuli is the bronchi trying to open too
    quickly to accomodate increased intake of air. In this case the bronchial walls spasm and expand
    causing a narrowing of the airways.

    Rather than the feeling that you can not get the air in fast enough, it feels more like you have a
    huge weight on your chest which is only allowing a little bit of air to enter your lungs. In the
    worst cases, it feels like you're being suffocated.

    Even when you stop and rest, recovery (even with medication) can take 30 minutes or more before you
    feel you can breathe normally. It will also, in the recovery stages and sometimes after exercise,
    manifest itself as wheezing.

    I
    > mentioned it to my doctor once before but he knows the guys I ride with and said we ride too fast
    > (jokingly). I only recently found out about exercise induced asthma and it seems to match.

    There are a couple of things that IME will trigger more severe attacks. Going from zero activity to
    high intensity within a very short period of time causes big problems. When I jump on the bike, I
    have to force myself to start really slowly, and gradually pick up the pace allowing my lungs to
    adjust as I increase the intensity. Avoiding steep climbs and sprints for the first 20 minutes or so
    allows the lungs to aclimatise.

    Cold weather makes things worse. The cold air against the warm bronchi is a bad stimulus which
    causes them to spasm more. Warming up properly in these conditions is even more important.

    I'm gradually trying to wean myself off the medication, by understanding better how my body works,
    but at times there's no avoiding it. Certainly, if your doctor diagnoses you, initially it's a good
    idea to take the med preventatively 20-30 minutes before you start exercising.

    --
    a.m-b FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/ambfaq.htm

    b.bmx FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/bmx_faq.htm
     
  5. Ozarkmtbr

    Ozarkmtbr Guest

    Thanks guys for the info.

    I should have added that I also feel this way when running. On a steady flat run with no sprinting,
    I will be fine for the first mile and then I will begin to have trouble getting enough air into my
    lungs. I will start to get light headed and have to stop for a few minutes until it subsides.

    I will make an appointment and go from there. Hopefully it just a lung capacity problem and I can
    just work on that.

    Thanks

    OzarkMtbr

    "bomba" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > OzarkMtbr wrote:
    > > I was wondering if any of you gents or gals have exercise induced
    asthma?
    >
    > Yep.
    >
    > I
    > > have come to the conclusion that I may be suffering from this ailment.
    I
    > > have yet to seek medical help on it, but am near that point. Before I
    do, I
    > > was wanting to check my symptoms. I feel it in a sprint or a climb. It
    is
    > > as if I can't get air into my lungs fast enough. I have had this
    problem
    > > for several years and always though I needed to train more. Lately I
    have
    > > hit a wall, no matter how much more I train it continues to plague me.
    >
    > This could still be caused by exertion. Everybody has their limits, which will be most felt on a
    > sprint or climb. It could well be that you've reached your peak. Even when I've not got asthma, I
    > still get the feeling of being heavily out of breath, but there's a big difference between maximum
    > lung capacity and EIA.
    >
    > EIA is a completely different feeling that comes in a range of severities. Asthma is caused by
    > irritation to the bronchi and in the case of EIA, the stimuli is the bronchi trying to open too
    > quickly to accomodate increased intake of air. In this case the bronchial walls spasm and expand
    > causing a narrowing of the airways.
    >
    > Rather than the feeling that you can not get the air in fast enough, it feels more like you have a
    > huge weight on your chest which is only allowing a little bit of air to enter your lungs. In the
    > worst cases, it feels like you're being suffocated.
    >
    > Even when you stop and rest, recovery (even with medication) can take 30 minutes or more before
    > you feel you can breathe normally. It will also, in the recovery stages and sometimes after
    > exercise, manifest itself as wheezing.
    >
    > I
    > > mentioned it to my doctor once before but he knows the guys I ride with
    and
    > > said we ride too fast (jokingly). I only recently found out about
    exercise
    > > induced asthma and it seems to match.
    >
    > There are a couple of things that IME will trigger more severe attacks. Going from zero activity
    > to high intensity within a very short period of time causes big problems. When I jump on the bike,
    > I have to force myself to start really slowly, and gradually pick up the pace allowing my lungs to
    > adjust as I increase the intensity. Avoiding steep climbs and sprints for the first 20 minutes or
    > so allows the lungs to aclimatise.
    >
    > Cold weather makes things worse. The cold air against the warm bronchi is a bad stimulus which
    > causes them to spasm more. Warming up properly in these conditions is even more important.
    >
    > I'm gradually trying to wean myself off the medication, by understanding better how my body works,
    > but at times there's no avoiding it. Certainly, if your doctor diagnoses you, initially it's a
    > good idea to take the med preventatively 20-30 minutes before you start exercising.
    >
    > --
    > a.m-b FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/ambfaq.htm
    >
    > a.bmx FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/bmx_faq.htm
     
  6. Chris Pugh

    Chris Pugh Guest

    Asthma is really a apin in the ass when you get it from something you love doing, it has stopped
    me from doing XC races for years. The thing i get really annoyed about is that it doesn't affect
    me at all when im jogging, just when i'm on my bike. Try getting an inhaler, because they really
    do help a lot.

    On Wed, 30 Apr 2003 10:36:49 +0200, bomba <[email protected]> wrote:

    >OzarkMtbr wrote:
    >> I was wondering if any of you gents or gals have exercise induced asthma?
    >
    >Yep.
    >
    >I
    >> have come to the conclusion that I may be suffering from this ailment. I have yet to seek medical
    >> help on it, but am near that point. Before I do, I was wanting to check my symptoms. I feel it in
    >> a sprint or a climb. It is as if I can't get air into my lungs fast enough. I have had this
    >> problem for several years and always though I needed to train more. Lately I have hit a wall, no
    >> matter how much more I train it continues to plague me.
    >
    >This could still be caused by exertion. Everybody has their limits, which will be most felt on a
    >sprint or climb. It could well be that you've reached your peak. Even when I've not got asthma, I
    >still get the feeling of being heavily out of breath, but there's a big difference between maximum
    >lung capacity and EIA.
    >
    >EIA is a completely different feeling that comes in a range of severities. Asthma is caused by
    >irritation to the bronchi and in the case of EIA, the stimuli is the bronchi trying to open too
    >quickly to accomodate increased intake of air. In this case the bronchial walls spasm and expand
    >causing a narrowing of the airways.
    >
    >Rather than the feeling that you can not get the air in fast enough, it feels more like you have a
    >huge weight on your chest which is only allowing a little bit of air to enter your lungs. In the
    >worst cases, it feels like you're being suffocated.
    >
    >Even when you stop and rest, recovery (even with medication) can take 30 minutes or more before you
    >feel you can breathe normally. It will also, in the recovery stages and sometimes after exercise,
    >manifest itself as wheezing.
    >
    >I
    >> mentioned it to my doctor once before but he knows the guys I ride with and said we ride too fast
    >> (jokingly). I only recently found out about exercise induced asthma and it seems to match.
    >
    >There are a couple of things that IME will trigger more severe attacks. Going from zero activity to
    >high intensity within a very short period of time causes big problems. When I jump on the bike, I
    >have to force myself to start really slowly, and gradually pick up the pace allowing my lungs to
    >adjust as I increase the intensity. Avoiding steep climbs and sprints for the first 20 minutes or
    >so allows the lungs to aclimatise.
    >
    >Cold weather makes things worse. The cold air against the warm bronchi is a bad stimulus which
    >causes them to spasm more. Warming up properly in these conditions is even more important.
    >
    >I'm gradually trying to wean myself off the medication, by understanding better how my body works,
    >but at times there's no avoiding it. Certainly, if your doctor diagnoses you, initially it's a good
    >idea to take the med preventatively 20-30 minutes before you start exercising.
     
  7. Sounds like me running, except mine usually hits a little earlier. I've run through it before, and
    ended up actually blacking out and falling in a field next to the road. I was only like 200 yards
    from the crew boathouse (I was actually on the driveway), and just kinda kept going. Hey, where's my
    peripheral vision going? OH well, I can deal with a tunnel... make that a blurry tunnel... no, a
    black... shit.

    Running gets to me because of the constant impact - it ain't easy on anything in the body, and the
    lungs are no exception. Cold air also gets me going REAL quickly. Therefore, my doctor recommended I
    NOT take up XC skiing ;)

    Jon Bond

    OzarkMtbr wrote:
    > Thanks guys for the info.
    >
    > I should have added that I also feel this way when running. On a steady flat run with no
    > sprinting, I will be fine for the first mile and then I will begin to have trouble getting enough
    > air into my lungs. I will start to get light headed and have to stop for a few minutes until it
    > subsides.
    >
    > I will make an appointment and go from there. Hopefully it just a lung capacity problem and I can
    > just work on that.
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > OzarkMtbr
    >
    >
    > "bomba" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    >>OzarkMtbr wrote:
    >>
    >>>I was wondering if any of you gents or gals have exercise induced
    >>
    > asthma?
    >
    >>Yep.
    >>
    >>I
    >>
    >>>have come to the conclusion that I may be suffering from this ailment.
    >>
    > I
    >
    >>>have yet to seek medical help on it, but am near that point. Before I
    >>
    > do, I
    >
    >>>was wanting to check my symptoms. I feel it in a sprint or a climb. It
    >>
    > is
    >
    >>>as if I can't get air into my lungs fast enough. I have had this
    >>
    > problem
    >
    >>>for several years and always though I needed to train more. Lately I
    >>
    > have
    >
    >>>hit a wall, no matter how much more I train it continues to plague me.
    >>
    >>This could still be caused by exertion. Everybody has their limits, which will be most felt on a
    >>sprint or climb. It could well be that you've reached your peak. Even when I've not got asthma, I
    >>still get the feeling of being heavily out of breath, but there's a big difference between maximum
    >>lung capacity and EIA.
    >>
    >>EIA is a completely different feeling that comes in a range of severities. Asthma is caused by
    >>irritation to the bronchi and in the case of EIA, the stimuli is the bronchi trying to open too
    >>quickly to accomodate increased intake of air. In this case the bronchial walls spasm and expand
    >>causing a narrowing of the airways.
    >>
    >>Rather than the feeling that you can not get the air in fast enough, it feels more like you have a
    >>huge weight on your chest which is only allowing a little bit of air to enter your lungs. In the
    >>worst cases, it feels like you're being suffocated.
    >>
    >>Even when you stop and rest, recovery (even with medication) can take 30 minutes or more before
    >>you feel you can breathe normally. It will also, in the recovery stages and sometimes after
    >>exercise, manifest itself as wheezing.
    >>
    >>I
    >>
    >>>mentioned it to my doctor once before but he knows the guys I ride with
    >>
    > and
    >
    >>>said we ride too fast (jokingly). I only recently found out about
    >>
    > exercise
    >
    >>>induced asthma and it seems to match.
    >>
    >>There are a couple of things that IME will trigger more severe attacks. Going from zero activity
    >>to high intensity within a very short period of time causes big problems. When I jump on the bike,
    >>I have to force myself to start really slowly, and gradually pick up the pace allowing my lungs to
    >>adjust as I increase the intensity. Avoiding steep climbs and sprints for the first 20 minutes or
    >>so allows the lungs to aclimatise.
    >>
    >>Cold weather makes things worse. The cold air against the warm bronchi is a bad stimulus which
    >>causes them to spasm more. Warming up properly in these conditions is even more important.
    >>
    >>I'm gradually trying to wean myself off the medication, by understanding better how my body works,
    >>but at times there's no avoiding it. Certainly, if your doctor diagnoses you, initially it's a
    >>good idea to take the med preventatively 20-30 minutes before you start exercising.
    >>
    >>--
    >>a.m-b FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/ambfaq.htm
    >>
    >>a.bmx FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/bmx_faq.htm
    >>
    >
     
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