Asthma



elrohwen

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Jul 13, 2003
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I've had exercise induced asthma for pretty much as long as I can remember. It's a huge problem when I try running/jogging, but it usually doesn't both me much in cycling unless I really go all out for a sprint or if I stand up to power up a hill. Recently, I joined a spinning class, and while I'm fine for the majority of the time, the instructor will tell us to stand up and pedal hard and the asthma almost always kicks in. I used to use inhalers, but I don't like how they make me feel (increased heart rate, shaking hands, etc). I feel like I should be able to control the condition myself with breathing or the right warm up ... any suggestion? Does anyone else have the same problem? It's just really frustrating when I know that my legs are strong and can go for hours, but my lungs give out as soon as I make a big effort.
 

elrohwen

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Jul 13, 2003
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Duh ... I'm an idiot :) I just read the post below about exercise induced asthma ... so, um, just ignore the post above :)
 

Klare

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Apr 17, 2004
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Originally posted by elrohwen
I've had exercise induced asthma for pretty much as long as I can remember. It's a huge problem when I try running/jogging, but it usually doesn't both me much in cycling unless I really go all out for a sprint or if I stand up to power up a hill. Recently, I joined a spinning class, and while I'm fine for the majority of the time, the instructor will tell us to stand up and pedal hard and the asthma almost always kicks in. I used to use inhalers, but I don't like how they make me feel (increased heart rate, shaking hands, etc). I feel like I should be able to control the condition myself with breathing or the right warm up ... any suggestion? Does anyone else have the same problem? It's just really frustrating when I know that my legs are strong and can go for hours, but my lungs give out as soon as I make a big effort.



Hi, I know how you feel, I have had asthma now for about 10yrs. I am training for an an endurance ride at the mo, n like you i hit the hills n although i know my legs can go for a long time, my lungs give out on me............i find that other cyclists who dont have asthma dont realise just how difficult/frustrating hills, etc are to those of us who do. I go to the gym where they've given me a routine to build up my stamina and strength, especially to increase my breathing capacity, these exercises are called plyometrics, plus i do weights also..................n to be honest , although it's pretty tough doing them, mainly cos i seem to be puffing n panting a lot.............i have noticed a difference when it comes to cycling. [/COLOR]
 

sea

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Nov 2, 2003
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I've had asthma for years too and find bicycling one of the best exercise for those with this affliction.

The inflammatory reaction from asthma can be progressive. The more attacks you get the easier it is to get an attack. If you want to control it without meds you will have to stop doing sprints and stop standing for hills. An alternative is to take frequent rests when climbing.

As far as I know all bronchial dilators have an effect on the heart. You might try some different ones to see what works best for you with the least negative reaction. If you keep over stressing you will need one. Do you use a steroid based inhaler too? Those usually produce less heart involvement but are to prevent inflammation rather than relax the bronchia after an attack.

Good luck.

Sea
 

Klare

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Apr 17, 2004
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Originally posted by sea
I've had asthma for years too and find bicycling one of the best exercise for those with this affliction.

The inflammatory reaction from asthma can be progressive. The more attacks you get the easier it is to get an attack. If you want to control it without meds you will have to stop doing sprints and stop standing for hills. An alternative is to take frequent rests when climbing.

As far as I know all bronchial dilators have an effect on the heart. You might try some different ones to see what works best for you with the least negative reaction. If you keep over stressing you will need one. Do you use a steroid based inhaler too? Those usually produce less heart involvement but are to prevent inflammation rather than relax the bronchia after an attack.

Good luck.

Sea

Hi,
My asthma is pretty well regulated n I very rarely get attacks, especially not from exercise................mine tends to come on if I'm really stressed/upset, or sometimes the weather can make me a bit tight chested. I tend to opt for the intermittant rests when climbing, although my non asthmatic cycling husband tells me to just keep going n not to stop!!..............this is when problems arise, ie. trying to explain why you just can't keep going................anyone else had these probs??
 

Cowboyathlete

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Mar 22, 2004
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Originally posted by Klare
Hi,
My asthma is pretty well regulated n I very rarely get attacks, especially not from exercise................mine tends to come on if I'm really stressed/upset, or sometimes the weather can make me a bit tight chested. I tend to opt for the intermittant rests when climbing, although my non asthmatic cycling husband tells me to just keep going n not to stop!!..............this is when problems arise, ie. trying to explain why you just can't keep going................anyone else had these probs??
I find that part very diffcult, i.e. trying to get others to understand that I NEEEEED to take a break to let my bronchial muscles relax. If he were not your husband, I would say find a new riding partner! I have a buddy who wants me to go mountain biking with him, but I have steadfastly refused because he cannot understand the nature of how this disease works. I find that if I start slowly enough (which I am often too eager to do), I can get myself used to it enough for later in the ride. I also find that when I ride on both Saturdays and Sundays, I have a much easier time riding on Sunday than on Saturday (i.e. almost no problems).
 

natewilkes

New Member
Apr 15, 2004
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I have had asthma for my entire life. 180mcg of Albuterol seems to keep the airways open if I take it 15-30 minutes before I ride. I have no idea how long it lasts though. I used to wait until I had the attack, but it is so hard to regain stasis that I just let the meds fly in advance now. If albuterol gives you the shakes maybe levobuterol(?) would work. Also staying very well hydrated is absolutely key for me to avoid an attack. I avoid unchecked stressors like the plague. My uncle and grandfather went untreated and suffer COPD & IIPF.
 

daler

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Apr 19, 2004
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i have the same problem. im 16 and was told i had asthma wen i was about 9 and have had real trouble since but riding and general exercise has helped. there was a point wen io had trouble doin my paper round! since then, ive lived 5km up a spanish mountain and rode it every time i went out and now ride daily to wrk (8miles) without inhalers because i dont like depending on them i have problems some cold days and wen i ride at the wknd in the hillier parts .
 

amaddeus

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May 4, 2004
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My son had Asthma and was on a Nebulizer every three hours of the day and night. My wife got him started on a nutritional supplement called Reliv. Two and a half weeks he was off all of his medication, and he hasn't had one problem since. That was almost 8 years ago.

My wife distributes this product now, her website is relivoffice.com.

I've been taking it for almost as long, and I feel great. I definetly helps me with my cycling. (I commute to work, 10.8 miles each way, 5 days a week) Just so there is no confusion, I don't have asthma.