Astoundingly cheap commuters

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by BT Humble, Jun 1, 2007.

  1. BT Humble

    BT Humble Guest

    I went for a wander through Big W at lunchtime today, as is my wont.
    I was quite struck by how much prices of basic commuter-level bicycles
    have dropped in just the past 18 months. I doubt it's ever been
    cheaper to buy a new MTB-style bike, and you certainly get a
    reasonable machine for your money. The one I was particularly looking
    at was $150 for a Front-suspension hardtail with 3-piece cranks and
    disk brakes at both ends. Mind you, even the $78 one-piece-crank
    version had alloy rims and V-brakes...

    I reckon a penniless uni student could fully equip themselves with
    bike & gear for under $200, which is only about 10 weeks' commuting at
    Canberra bus ticket prices. Back when I was at uni you couldn't buy a
    bottom-of-the-range K-mart MTB for that...

    Mind you, If I could wind the clock back 16 years to my uni days, I'd
    have sold my car to the wreckers the FIRST time it crapped out on me,
    and stuck with a pushie. OK, and maybe a postie bike for the visits
    to my parents (160km away). ;-)


    BTH
     
    Tags:


  2. In aus.bicycle on Fri, 01 Jun 2007 02:06:20 -0700
    BT Humble <[email protected]> wrote:
    > at was $150 for a Front-suspension hardtail with 3-piece cranks and
    > disk brakes at both ends. Mind you, even the $78 one-piece-crank


    At that price I should buy one to get the brakes!

    I ahve been wanting disks for the bent...

    Zebee
     
  3. BT Humble

    BT Humble Guest

    On Jun 1, 7:18 pm, Zebee Johnstone <[email protected]> wrote:
    > In aus.bicycle on Fri, 01 Jun 2007 02:06:20 -0700
    >
    > BT Humble <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > at was $150 for a Front-suspension hardtail with 3-piece cranks and
    > > disk brakes at both ends. Mind you, even the $78 one-piece-crank

    >
    > At that price I should buy one to get the brakes!
    >
    > I ahve been wanting disks for the bent...
    >
    > Zebee


    You'd have to get your wheels laced onto the hubs, and get some
    mounting points brazed on for the calipers, but yeah, it seems cheap
    enough.
     
  4. Bleve

    Bleve Guest

    On Jun 1, 7:18 pm, Zebee Johnstone <[email protected]> wrote:
    > In aus.bicycle on Fri, 01 Jun 2007 02:06:20 -0700
    >
    > BT Humble <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > at was $150 for a Front-suspension hardtail with 3-piece cranks and
    > > disk brakes at both ends. Mind you, even the $78 one-piece-crank

    >
    > At that price I should buy one to get the brakes!


    You will be getting what you paid for. Caveat Emptor.
     
  5. Plodder

    Plodder Guest

    "BT Humble" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >I went for a wander through Big W at lunchtime today, as is my wont.
    > I was quite struck by how much prices of basic commuter-level bicycles
    > have dropped in just the past 18 months. I doubt it's ever been
    > cheaper to buy a new MTB-style bike, and you certainly get a
    > reasonable machine for your money. The one I was particularly looking
    > at was $150 for a Front-suspension hardtail with 3-piece cranks and
    > disk brakes at both ends. Mind you, even the $78 one-piece-crank
    > version had alloy rims and V-brakes...
    >
    > I reckon a penniless uni student could fully equip themselves with
    > bike & gear for under $200, which is only about 10 weeks' commuting at
    > Canberra bus ticket prices. Back when I was at uni you couldn't buy a
    > bottom-of-the-range K-mart MTB for that...
    >
    > Mind you, If I could wind the clock back 16 years to my uni days, I'd
    > have sold my car to the wreckers the FIRST time it crapped out on me,
    > and stuck with a pushie. OK, and maybe a postie bike for the visits
    > to my parents (160km away). ;-)
    >
    >
    > BTH


    Yep. As a bike shop owner I just love these cheapies - My workshop's full of
    them :)

    me
     
  6. BT Humble

    BT Humble Guest

    Plodder wrote:
    > Yep. As a bike shop owner I just love these cheapies - My workshop's full of
    > them :)


    Hmm. Perhaps I should refine that to "a penniless uni student who
    isn't afraid to get their hands dirty and can find their way to
    www.sheldonbrown.com" ...


    BTH
     
  7. Blue Heeler

    Blue Heeler Guest

    BT Humble wrote:

    >
    > Mind you, If I could wind the clock back 16 years to my uni days, I'd
    > have sold my car to the wreckers the FIRST time it crapped out on me,
    > and stuck with a pushie. OK, and maybe a postie bike for the visits
    > to my parents (160km away). ;-)
    >


    If I could turn the clock back 30 years to my first go at Uni, I'd work
    harder, smoke less dope, get involved in fewer "causes" and I'd be
    retired now.

    To bring this back to aus.bicycle.

    Just bought a Miyata 312 on eBay for $43. Looks like it needs new
    tyres, a re-spoke on the back wheel and a bit of a clean up.

    I wanted a steel framed "dunger" to leave on the trainer permanently
    and this will fit the bill a treat.


    --
     
  8. In aus.bicycle on Fri, 01 Jun 2007 02:51:10 -0700
    BT Humble <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > You'd have to get your wheels laced onto the hubs, and get some
    > mounting points brazed on for the calipers, but yeah, it seems cheap
    > enough.


    I have a disk hub at the front, and caliper mounts front and rear. As
    the rear is already horribly easy to lock up, I'd just need the front.

    But then I suppose I can pick up a front disk and brake for $150 if I
    look hard enough.

    Zebee
     
  9. Joel Mayes

    Joel Mayes Guest

    On 2007-06-01, Plodder <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > "BT Humble" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >>I went for a wander through Big W at lunchtime today, as is my wont.
    >> I was quite struck by how much prices of basic commuter-level bicycles
    >> have dropped in just the past 18 months.


    >
    > Yep. As a bike shop owner I just love these cheapies - My workshop's full of
    > them :)
    >
    > me



    My favorite 'design feature' on these bike is the use of mild steel
    nipples to lace the rim to a steel hub. You ride them for a year and
    then the stainless steel spokes start snapping in the middle.

    Joel 'gotta love galvanic action' Mayes

    --
    Human Powered Cycles | High quality servicing and repairs
    [email protected] | Affordable second hand bikes
    (03) 9029 6504 | Bicycle reuse centre
    www.humanpowered.com.au | Mechanical and on-road training and instruction
     
  10. Resound

    Resound Guest

    My latest purchase was $35 plus $10 for a new gearshift cable. And a small
    dob of grease for the front bearings. It did a pretty good job over the 15km
    to work the other day too.

    "BT Humble" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >I went for a wander through Big W at lunchtime today, as is my wont.
    > I was quite struck by how much prices of basic commuter-level bicycles
    > have dropped in just the past 18 months. I doubt it's ever been
    > cheaper to buy a new MTB-style bike, and you certainly get a
    > reasonable machine for your money. The one I was particularly looking
    > at was $150 for a Front-suspension hardtail with 3-piece cranks and
    > disk brakes at both ends. Mind you, even the $78 one-piece-crank
    > version had alloy rims and V-brakes...
    >
    > I reckon a penniless uni student could fully equip themselves with
    > bike & gear for under $200, which is only about 10 weeks' commuting at
    > Canberra bus ticket prices. Back when I was at uni you couldn't buy a
    > bottom-of-the-range K-mart MTB for that...
    >
    > Mind you, If I could wind the clock back 16 years to my uni days, I'd
    > have sold my car to the wreckers the FIRST time it crapped out on me,
    > and stuck with a pushie. OK, and maybe a postie bike for the visits
    > to my parents (160km away). ;-)
    >
    >
    > BTH
    >
    >
     
  11. M Bison

    M Bison Guest

    On Fri, 01 Jun 2007 02:06:20 -0700, BT Humble wrote:

    <snip>

    > I reckon a penniless uni student could fully equip themselves with
    > bike & gear for under $200, which is only about 10 weeks' commuting at
    > Canberra bus ticket prices. Back when I was at uni you couldn't buy a
    > bottom-of-the-range K-mart MTB for that...
    >


    Which makes the bus half the price if the bike only lasts 5 weeks!
     
  12. Dave

    Dave Guest

    On Fri, 01 Jun 2007 11:24:04 +0000, Zebee Johnstone wrote:

    > But then I suppose I can pick up a front disk and brake for $150 if I
    > look hard enough.


    Probably even less, if you stick with cables. For hydro it's a touch more,
    but the Shimano Deore offerings are both pretty good, and I've also heard
    good things about Avid's cable brakes.

    --
    Dave Hughes | [email protected]
    "Contrary to popular belief, Unix is user friendly. It just happens to
    be very selective about who its friends are" -- Kyle Hearn
     
  13. In aus.bicycle on 02 Jun 2007 00:23:28 GMT
    Dave <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Fri, 01 Jun 2007 11:24:04 +0000, Zebee Johnstone wrote:
    >
    >> But then I suppose I can pick up a front disk and brake for $150 if I
    >> look hard enough.

    >
    > Probably even less, if you stick with cables. For hydro it's a touch more,
    > but the Shimano Deore offerings are both pretty good, and I've also heard
    > good things about Avid's cable brakes.


    The avid seems to be what most Bacchettans are going for if they
    change to disks, and as that's the make of V brake I have I beleive I
    can keep the levers for some versions of disk. Which is a distinct
    plus.

    All my tuits are a sort of wonky square these days though.

    Zebee
     
  14. Terryc

    Terryc Guest

    Blue Heeler wrote:

    > If I could turn the clock back 30 years to my first go at Uni, I'd work
    > harder, smoke less dope, get involved in fewer "causes" and I'd be
    > retired now.


    Yeh, but what a boring life and career you would have lead.

    BTDT.

    SWMBO tried breaking a concrete footpath with her noggin in Coolamon
    recently and as we sat in Wagga Wagga emergency for hours waiting for
    xrays to see if she broken her skull instead, indian doctor is quizzing
    old guy in next bed who was brought in after being found unconscious on
    floor of nursing home.

    There was a major problem in that the indian doctor had obviously learnt
    a formal, version of english for educated people, whereas this old bloke
    probably only had a basic education and had to keep re-interpreting
    every question, e.g siblings -> children, etc, by which time doctor had
    moved onto next question. He was obviously getting rather annoyed at the
    doctor because when it came to "what job did you do", he repeated "I'm
    retired in a louder voice".

    Quack clarified and the answer became "Everything", which I recon means
    that he probably had a very interesting life out in the country.

    Naah, did get to ask how much bicycle riding he had done either.
     
  15. Dave

    Dave Guest

    On Sat, 02 Jun 2007 02:37:43 +0000, Zebee Johnstone wrote:

    > The avid seems to be what most Bacchettans are going for if they
    > change to disks, and as that's the make of V brake I have I beleive I
    > can keep the levers for some versions of disk. Which is a distinct
    > plus.


    Cable discs *should* just work with any v-brake compatible lever. It's not
    hard to get travel adjusters for use with drop levers or older canti
    levers, which pull less cable.

    It sounds like a fairly painless upgrade, though it's your call how useful
    it'd be.

    --
    Dave Hughes | [email protected]
    "When all you've got is a nailgun, every problem looks like a messiah."
    - Iain Chalmers
     
  16. PeteSig

    PeteSig Guest

    "Zebee Johnstone" wrote:

    > Dave wrote:


    >> I've also heard good things about Avid's cable brakes.

    >
    > The avid seems to be what most Bacchettans are going for if they
    > change to disks, and as that's the make of V brake I have I beleive I
    > can keep the levers for some versions of disk.


    If you have the Avid V-brakes, i've heard many reports that they are
    actually better than virtually any cable disc, and almost as good as
    hydraulics. The only real advantage of discs then is their better wet
    weather/mud performance and the removal of rim wear. Think about any changes
    you make.

    --
    Cheers
    Peter

    ~~~ ~ [email protected]
    ~~ ~ _- \,
    ~~ (*)/ (*)
     
  17. Dancier

    Dancier New Member

    Joined:
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    Sounds like the perfect bike for the inner suburbs of Melbourne, if it stays intact for more than a month then you've got it made. I walked past one the other day chained to a pole, all that was left was the frame.
     
  18. In aus.bicycle on Sat, 02 Jun 2007 09:30:36 GMT
    PeteSig <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > If you have the Avid V-brakes, i've heard many reports that they are
    > actually better than virtually any cable disc, and almost as good as
    > hydraulics. The only real advantage of discs then is their better wet
    > weather/mud performance and the removal of rim wear. Think about any changes
    > you make.


    It's the wet weather performance that interests me. As I ride all
    year round, and in traffic, and down a few hills, good braking in the
    wet is important, if we have any wet... The couple of times I have, I
    have noticed a distinct lack of slowing down from the current setup.

    I only need it for the front as the rear locks up easily wet or dry.

    Zebee
     
  19. PeteSig

    PeteSig Guest

    "Zebee Johnstone" wrote:

    > It's the wet weather performance that interests me. As I ride all
    > year round, and in traffic, and down a few hills, good braking in the
    > wet is important, if we have any wet... The couple of times I have, I
    > have noticed a distinct lack of slowing down from the current setup.
    >
    > I only need it for the front as the rear locks up easily wet or dry.


    OK, that makes sense.

    Does your bike have alloy rims? I'd assume so, but steel rims are
    notoriously bad in the wet, so if they were steel the better upgrade would
    be to get alloy rims.

    Incidentally, does your recumbent have a smaller front wheel (eg 20") I'm
    not sure about the physics of it but I do believe discs should be more
    effective on a small wheel than a 26" as they are proportionally bigger
    compared to the rim. Thus greater braking leverage. Someone here will tell
    me if I'm wrong or not.

    --
    Cheers
    Peter

    ~~~ ~ [email protected]
    ~~ ~ _- \,
    ~~ (*)/ (*)
     
  20. In aus.bicycle on Sat, 02 Jun 2007 13:25:23 GMT
    PeteSig <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > Does your bike have alloy rims? I'd assume so, but steel rims are
    > notoriously bad in the wet, so if they were steel the better upgrade would
    > be to get alloy rims.


    Yes, alloy.

    >
    > Incidentally, does your recumbent have a smaller front wheel (eg 20") I'm
    > not sure about the physics of it but I do believe discs should be more
    > effective on a small wheel than a 26" as they are proportionally bigger
    > compared to the rim. Thus greater braking leverage. Someone here will tell
    > me if I'm wrong or not.


    It's a 20" front. No idea about the physics but it does seem
    intuitively likely.

    IT is one of those roundtuit things really. plenty of mail order disk
    brakes about, jsut have to find the energy.

    Zebee
     
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