Atkin's The Last Word



D

Dashi

Guest
When Faith Is Toast By Richard Cohen Thursday, February 12, 2004; Page A37

Near where I live is a marvelous bakery. Sometimes I stand outside the window, like some forlorn
figure from Dickens, and watch people eat their bread, lathering it with butter or jelly or --
someone stop me! -- cream cheese on a toasted anything. I love bread more than almost anything in
the world, but I will not have it, cannot have it, have not had it -- all on account of Robert
Atkins, who died last year at the age of 72, weighing 258 pounds, or 50 to 60 pounds overweight. For
years, I've been on his diet.

The circumstances of Atkins's death are somewhat in dispute. Officially, he died from a fall --
slipped on ice and hit his head. At the same time, his medical records show that he had a history of
heart problems and was way overweight when he died. The people who run the Atkins diet industry
insist that nothing about the diet figured either in Atkins's death, or his history of heart
problems, and that his obesity at death was due to a fluid buildup caused by the heart problems.
This is their story and they're sticking to it. My story is that I've been on something like the
Atkins diet for years. I say "something like" since I never actually read his diet book or consulted
a doctor of any kind. I simply listened to what my friends were saying and cut out bread and pasta
and started eating meat. It worked. I lost weight. Sure, I missed my bread. Sure, I missed my bagel
in the morning. And sure, I missed my pasta, which I enjoyed at least once a day. It was tough to
give all that up. But in exchange, I got to eat meat, which meant steak, which is what I was not
supposed to eat until Dr. Atkins, blessed be he, came along and repealed all sorts of laws of nature
or physics. I loved the guy. I could have bacon. This was Atkins's greatest gift. Not only was bacon
suddenly okay and not, as it had been before, the precursor of almost-instant death, but it was
actually good for you. Every morning, I had three slices of delicious bacon. What a diet! On
weekends, I sometimes had more than three slices, figuring that if three slices were good for me,
six were even better, a virtual fountain of youth from which I could drink each morning of a very,
very long life. Now, all of that is being brought into question. A group of anti-Atkins guerrilla
fighters, the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, which advocates vegetarian diets, got
hold of the New York City medical examiner's report on Atkins's death and went to town with it. They
raised all sorts of questions: Why the heart condition? Why was he so obese? Did his diet contribute
to his heart problems? In other words, could you really eat fat and lose weight at the same time --
and stay healthy? After all, 72 is not that old. For me -- and countless others -- much depends on
the answer to that question, and I'm not talking about diet and health. I'm talking instead about
gullibility, about wanting to believe something so badly that common sense got shoved aside. (Bacon,
indeed!) The Atkins diet made me into a believer. Here I was, all these years, the sort of person
who laughed when some homophobe turned out to be gay or some cultural conservative was found in the
hay with a 16-year-old. I scoffed at people who were always discovering that college sports were
corrupt or that "fan" was just another word for sucker. Me? I floated above it all. I believed fully
and without reservation in cynicism. Cynicism will never let you down. And yet every morning, I did
my little religious number from the church of
Dr. Atkins. I had my bacon. It made no sense -- not to me, anyway -- but it gave me something I
wanted, which happened to be the bacon. Later in the day, I could have my steak -- the fattier,
the better -- and take solace from the sacrifice I was making by forswearing bread and pasta.
Now, I am experiencing a crisis of faith. Atkins is dead and his secret is out. He was fat and
sick. I want to move on to a new diet, something with bread and pasta that also satisfies my
newly reinforced cynicism. All I need is someone to tell me it works. [email protected]
 
H

Howard Kveck

Guest
In article <C%[email protected]_s54>, "Dashi" <[email protected]>
wrote:

> When Faith Is Toast By Richard Cohen Thursday, February 12, 2004; Page A37

As has been said, every now and then, they get Cohen's medication just right and he hits one out
of the park. Nice.

--
tanx, Howard

"We're not laughing -at- you, we're laughing -with- you..) "But... I'm not
laughing???" Happiness

remove YOUR SHOES to reply, ok?
 
B

B. Lafferty

Guest
Just finished reading it our local paper. Wonderful!

"Dashi" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:C%[email protected]_s54...
> When Faith Is Toast By Richard Cohen Thursday, February 12, 2004; Page A37
>
> Near where I live is a marvelous bakery. Sometimes I stand outside the window, like some forlorn
> figure from Dickens, and watch people eat their bread, lathering it with butter or jelly or --
> someone stop me! -- cream cheese on a toasted anything. I love bread more than almost anything in
the
> world, but I will not have it, cannot have it, have not had it -- all on account of Robert Atkins,
> who died last year at the age of 72, weighing
258
> pounds, or 50 to 60 pounds overweight. For years, I've been on his diet.
>
>
> The circumstances of Atkins's death are somewhat in dispute. Officially,
he
> died from a fall -- slipped on ice and hit his head. At the same time, his medical records show
> that he had a history of heart problems and was way overweight when he died. The people who run
> the Atkins diet industry
insist
> that nothing about the diet figured either in Atkins's death, or his
history
> of heart problems, and that his obesity at death was due to a fluid
buildup
> caused by the heart problems. This is their story and they're sticking to it. My story is that
> I've been on something like the Atkins diet for years. I say "something like" since I never
> actually read his diet book or
consulted
> a doctor of any kind. I simply listened to what my friends were saying and cut out bread and pasta
> and started eating meat. It worked. I lost weight. Sure, I missed my bread. Sure, I missed my
> bagel in the morning. And sure,
I
> missed my pasta, which I enjoyed at least once a day. It was tough to give all that up. But in
> exchange, I got to eat meat, which meant steak, which
is
> what I was not supposed to eat until Dr. Atkins, blessed be he, came along and repealed all sorts
> of laws of nature or physics. I loved the guy. I could have bacon. This was Atkins's greatest
> gift. Not only was bacon suddenly okay and not, as it had been before, the precursor of almost-
> instant death, but it was actually good for you. Every morning, I
had
> three slices of delicious bacon. What a diet! On weekends, I sometimes had more than three slices,
> figuring that if three slices were good for me,
six
> were even better, a virtual fountain of youth from which I could drink
each
> morning of a very, very long life. Now, all of that is being brought into question. A group of anti-
> Atkins guerrilla fighters, the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine,
which
> advocates vegetarian diets, got hold of the New York City medical
examiner's
> report on Atkins's death and went to town with it. They raised all sorts
of
> questions: Why the heart condition? Why was he so obese? Did his diet contribute to his heart
> problems? In other words, could you really eat fat and lose weight at the same time -- and stay
> healthy? After all, 72 is not that old. For me -- and countless others -- much depends on the
> answer to that question, and I'm not talking about diet and health. I'm talking instead about
> gullibility, about wanting to believe something so badly that common sense got shoved aside.
> (Bacon, indeed!) The Atkins diet made me into a believer. Here I was, all these years, the sort of
> person who laughed when some homophobe turned out to be gay or some cultural conservative was
found
> in the hay with a 16-year-old. I scoffed at people who were always discovering that college sports
> were corrupt or that "fan" was just
another
> word for sucker. Me? I floated above it all. I believed fully and without reservation in cynicism.
> Cynicism will never let you down. And yet every morning, I did my little religious number from the
> church of
> Dr. Atkins. I had my bacon. It made no sense -- not to me, anyway -- but
it
> gave me something I wanted, which happened to be the bacon. Later in the day, I could have my
> steak -- the fattier, the better -- and take solace from the sacrifice I was making by forswearing
> bread and pasta. Now, I am experiencing a crisis of faith. Atkins is dead and his secret is out.
> He was fat and sick. I want to move on to a new diet, something with bread and pasta that also
> satisfies my newly reinforced cynicism. All I need is someone to tell me it works.
> [email protected]
 
K

Ken Very Big Li

Guest
Like this is supposed to be the Final Word. If you have ever seen Dr. Atkins on TV and believed he
weighed 258lbs, then you're a gullible fool. I guess the proof of Atkins or South Beach or Dr. Phil
(whatever diet he proposes) or anyone else is in the pudding. If you loose weight and your lipid
profiles are better than what they were, well then there's nothing really to argue. I leave room in
my opinion for developing science, nothing is set in stone forever, but I think that basically
Atkins and et al are correct about the US diet - too many sugars in the form of sodas and other junk
foods and basic inactivity make us fat. I mean, people went to low-fat diets and it just made
Americans fatter, supposedly.

As usual, there are people who will do anything to tear down someone else's reputation (see
Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine) to further their own cause.

On Fri, 13 Feb 2004 05:10:58 GMT, "Dashi" <[email protected]> wrote:

>When Faith Is Toast By Richard Cohen Thursday, February 12, 2004; Page A37
>
>Near where I live is a marvelous bakery. Sometimes I stand outside the window, like some forlorn
>figure from Dickens, and watch people eat their bread, lathering it with butter or jelly or --
>someone stop me! -- cream cheese on a toasted anything. I love bread more than almost anything in
>the world, but I will not have it, cannot have it, have not had it -- all on account of Robert
>Atkins, who died last year at the age of 72, weighing 258 pounds, or 50 to 60 pounds overweight.
>For years, I've been on his diet.
>
>
>The circumstances of Atkins's death are somewhat in dispute. Officially, he died from a fall --
>slipped on ice and hit his head. At the same time, his medical records show that he had a history
>of heart problems and was way overweight when he died. The people who run the Atkins diet industry
>insist that nothing about the diet figured either in Atkins's death, or his history of heart
>problems, and that his obesity at death was due to a fluid buildup caused by the heart problems.
>This is their story and they're sticking to it. My story is that I've been on something like the
>Atkins diet for years. I say "something like" since I never actually read his diet book or
>consulted a doctor of any kind. I simply listened to what my friends were saying and cut out bread
>and pasta and started eating meat. It worked. I lost weight. Sure, I missed my bread. Sure, I
>missed my bagel in the morning. And sure, I missed my pasta, which I enjoyed at least once a day.
>It was tough to give all that up. But in exchange, I got to eat meat, which meant steak, which is
>what I was not supposed to eat until Dr. Atkins, blessed be he, came along and repealed all sorts
>of laws of nature or physics. I loved the guy. I could have bacon. This was Atkins's greatest gift.
>Not only was bacon suddenly okay and not, as it had been before, the precursor of almost-instant
>death, but it was actually good for you. Every morning, I had three slices of delicious bacon. What
>a diet! On weekends, I sometimes had more than three slices, figuring that if three slices were
>good for me, six were even better, a virtual fountain of youth from which I could drink each
>morning of a very, very long life. Now, all of that is being brought into question. A group of anti-
>Atkins guerrilla fighters, the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, which advocates
>vegetarian diets, got hold of the New York City medical examiner's report on Atkins's death and
>went to town with it. They raised all sorts of questions: Why the heart condition? Why was he so
>obese? Did his diet contribute to his heart problems? In other words, could you really eat fat and
>lose weight at the same time -- and stay healthy? After all, 72 is not that old. For me -- and
>countless others -- much depends on the answer to that question, and I'm not talking about diet and
>health. I'm talking instead about gullibility, about wanting to believe something so badly that
>common sense got shoved aside. (Bacon, indeed!) The Atkins diet made me into a believer. Here I
>was, all these years, the sort of person who laughed when some homophobe turned out to be gay or
>some cultural conservative was found in the hay with a 16-year-old. I scoffed at people who were
>always discovering that college sports were corrupt or that "fan" was just another word for sucker.
>Me? I floated above it all. I believed fully and without reservation in cynicism. Cynicism will
>never let you down. And yet every morning, I did my little religious number from the church of
>Dr. Atkins. I had my bacon. It made no sense -- not to me, anyway -- but it gave me something I
> wanted, which happened to be the bacon. Later in the day, I could have my steak -- the fattier,
> the better -- and take solace from the sacrifice I was making by forswearing bread and pasta.
> Now, I am experiencing a crisis of faith. Atkins is dead and his secret is out. He was fat and
> sick. I want to move on to a new diet, something with bread and pasta that also satisfies my
> newly reinforced cynicism. All I need is someone to tell me it works. [email protected]
>

---
Kelly Beard, a.k.a. Mr. K.V.B. Liar
 
D

Dashi

Guest
Yeah Ken sure! wink, wink :)

Dashi

"Ken Very Big Liar" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Like this is supposed to be the Final Word. If you have ever seen Dr. Atkins on TV and believed he
> weighed 258lbs, then you're a gullible fool. I guess the proof of Atkins or South Beach or Dr.
> Phil (whatever diet he proposes) or anyone else is in the pudding. If you loose weight and your
> lipid profiles are better than what they were, well then there's nothing really to argue. I leave
> room in my opinion for developing science, nothing is set in stone forever, but I think that
> basically Atkins and et al are correct about the US diet - too many sugars in the form of sodas
> and other junk foods and basic inactivity make us fat. I mean, people went to low-fat diets and it
> just made Americans fatter, supposedly.
>
> As usual, there are people who will do anything to tear down someone else's reputation (see
> Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine) to further their own cause.
>
> On Fri, 13 Feb 2004 05:10:58 GMT, "Dashi" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>>When Faith Is Toast By Richard Cohen Thursday, February 12, 2004; Page A37
>>
>>Near where I live is a marvelous bakery. Sometimes I stand outside the window, like some forlorn
>>figure from Dickens, and watch people eat their bread, lathering it with butter or jelly or --
>>someone stop me! -- cream cheese on a toasted anything. I love bread more than almost anything in
>>the world, but I will not have it, cannot have it, have not had it -- all on account of Robert
>>Atkins, who died last year at the age of 72, weighing 258 pounds, or 50 to 60 pounds overweight.
>>For years, I've been on his diet.
>>
>>
>>The circumstances of Atkins's death are somewhat in dispute. Officially, he died from a fall --
>>slipped on ice and hit his head. At the same time, his medical records show that he had a history
>>of heart problems and was way overweight when he died. The people who run the Atkins diet industry
>>insist that nothing about the diet figured either in Atkins's death, or his history of heart
>>problems, and that his obesity at death was due to a fluid buildup caused by the heart problems.
>>This is their story and they're sticking to it. My story is that I've been on something like the
>>Atkins diet for years. I say "something like" since I never actually read his diet book or
>>consulted a doctor of any kind. I simply listened to what my friends were saying and cut out bread
>>and pasta and started eating meat. It worked. I lost weight. Sure, I missed my bread. Sure, I
>>missed my bagel in the morning. And sure, I missed my pasta, which I enjoyed at least once a day.
>>It was tough to give all that up. But in exchange, I got to eat meat, which meant steak, which is
>>what I was not supposed to eat until Dr. Atkins, blessed be he, came along and repealed all sorts
>>of laws of nature or physics. I loved the guy. I could have bacon. This was Atkins's greatest
>>gift. Not only was bacon suddenly okay and not, as it had been before, the precursor of almost-
>>instant death, but it was actually good for you. Every morning, I had three slices of delicious
>>bacon. What a diet! On weekends, I sometimes had more than three slices, figuring that if three
>>slices were good for me, six were even better, a virtual fountain of youth from which I could
>>drink each morning of a very, very long life. Now, all of that is being brought into question. A
>>group of anti-Atkins guerrilla fighters, the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, which
>>advocates vegetarian diets, got hold of the New York City medical examiner's report on Atkins's
>>death and went to town with it. They raised all sorts of questions: Why the heart condition? Why
>>was he so obese? Did his diet contribute to his heart problems? In other words, could you really
>>eat fat and lose weight at the same time -- and stay healthy? After all, 72 is not that old. For
>>me -- and countless others -- much depends on the answer to that question, and I'm not talking
>>about diet and health. I'm talking instead about gullibility, about wanting to believe something
>>so badly that common sense got shoved aside. (Bacon, indeed!) The Atkins diet made me into a
>>believer. Here I was, all these years, the sort of person who laughed when some homophobe turned
>>out to be gay or some cultural conservative was found in the hay with a 16-year-old. I scoffed at
>>people who were always discovering that college sports were corrupt or that "fan" was just another
>>word for sucker. Me? I floated above it all. I believed fully and without reservation in cynicism.
>>Cynicism will never let you down. And yet every morning, I did my little religious number from the
>>church of
>>Dr. Atkins. I had my bacon. It made no sense -- not to me, anyway -- but it gave me something I
>> wanted, which happened to be the bacon. Later in the day, I could have my steak -- the
>> fattier, the better -- and take solace from the sacrifice I was making by forswearing bread
>> and pasta. Now, I am experiencing a crisis of faith. Atkins is dead and his secret is out. He
>> was fat and sick. I want to move on to a new diet, something with bread and pasta that also
>> satisfies my newly reinforced cynicism. All I need is someone to tell me it works.
>> [email protected]
>>
>
> ---
> Kelly Beard, a.k.a. Mr. K.V.B. Liar
 
S

Smiles

Guest
I agree with what you say US diet ... if we just dumped soda's (diet included) we would be much
better off. Being an engineer I use my bod as a chemistry set from time to time (not adding
chemicals ... just see it's reaction to foods) ... went on Atkins and lost weight, my breath always
stunk and I would cramp easily, conclusion if the diet requires so much additional supplementation
it's not great. I use to drink tons of sodas ... went to diet and did not lose weight ... went to
water and 100% juice products, and lost weight, conclusion that although the diet sodas are only 1
cal they react with the body and cause limited to no weight loss.

I think the key to our "bad" diet is Corn ... a food product used to fatten farm animals. Look at
the labels, it's in just about everything!!! It's being used as a "natural sweetener" in just about
everything ... like cranberry juice (it go tons of corn syrup in it).

s http://boardnbike.com

"Ken Very Big Liar" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Like this is supposed to be the Final Word. If you have ever seen Dr.
Atkins on
> TV and believed he weighed 258lbs, then you're a gullible fool. I guess
the
> proof of Atkins or South Beach or Dr. Phil (whatever diet he proposes) or
anyone
> else is in the pudding. If you loose weight and your lipid profiles are
better
> than what they were, well then there's nothing really to argue. I leave
room in
> my opinion for developing science, nothing is set in stone forever, but I
think
> that basically Atkins and et al are correct about the US diet - too many
sugars
> in the form of sodas and other junk foods and basic inactivity make us
fat. I
> mean, people went to low-fat diets and it just made Americans fatter, supposedly.
>
> As usual, there are people who will do anything to tear down someone
else's
> reputation (see Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine) to further
their
> own cause.
>
> On Fri, 13 Feb 2004 05:10:58 GMT, "Dashi" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> >When Faith Is Toast By Richard Cohen Thursday, February 12, 2004; Page A37
> >
> >Near where I live is a marvelous bakery. Sometimes I stand outside the window, like some forlorn
> >figure from Dickens, and watch people eat their bread, lathering it with butter or jelly or --
> >someone stop me! -- cream cheese on a toasted anything. I love bread more than almost anything in
the
> >world, but I will not have it, cannot have it, have not had it -- all on account of Robert
> >Atkins, who died last year at the age of 72, weighing
258
> >pounds, or 50 to 60 pounds overweight. For years, I've been on his diet.
> >
> >
> >The circumstances of Atkins's death are somewhat in dispute. Officially,
he
> >died from a fall -- slipped on ice and hit his head. At the same time,
his
> >medical records show that he had a history of heart problems and was way overweight when he died.
> >The people who run the Atkins diet industry
insist
> >that nothing about the diet figured either in Atkins's death, or his
history
> >of heart problems, and that his obesity at death was due to a fluid
buildup
> >caused by the heart problems. This is their story and they're sticking to it. My story is that
> >I've been on something like the Atkins diet for years. I say "something like" since I never
> >actually read his diet book or
consulted
> >a doctor of any kind. I simply listened to what my friends were saying
and
> >cut out bread and pasta and started eating meat. It worked. I lost
weight.
> >Sure, I missed my bread. Sure, I missed my bagel in the morning. And
sure, I
> >missed my pasta, which I enjoyed at least once a day. It was tough to
give
> >all that up. But in exchange, I got to eat meat, which meant steak, which
is
> >what I was not supposed to eat until Dr. Atkins, blessed be he, came
along
> >and repealed all sorts of laws of nature or physics. I loved the guy. I could have bacon. This
> >was Atkins's greatest gift. Not only was bacon suddenly okay and not, as it had been before, the
> >precursor of almost-instant death, but it was actually good for you. Every morning, I
had
> >three slices of delicious bacon. What a diet! On weekends, I sometimes
had
> >more than three slices, figuring that if three slices were good for me,
six
> >were even better, a virtual fountain of youth from which I could drink
each
> >morning of a very, very long life. Now, all of that is being brought into question. A group of
> >anti-Atkins guerrilla fighters, the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine,
which
> >advocates vegetarian diets, got hold of the New York City medical
examiner's
> >report on Atkins's death and went to town with it. They raised all sorts
of
> >questions: Why the heart condition? Why was he so obese? Did his diet contribute to his heart
> >problems? In other words, could you really eat
fat
> >and lose weight at the same time -- and stay healthy? After all, 72 is
not
> >that old. For me -- and countless others -- much depends on the answer to that question, and I'm
> >not talking about diet and health. I'm talking instead about gullibility, about wanting to
> >believe something so badly that
common
> >sense got shoved aside. (Bacon, indeed!) The Atkins diet made me into a believer. Here I was, all
> >these years, the sort of person who laughed
when
> >some homophobe turned out to be gay or some cultural conservative was
found
> >in the hay with a 16-year-old. I scoffed at people who were always discovering that college
> >sports were corrupt or that "fan" was just
another
> >word for sucker. Me? I floated above it all. I believed fully and without reservation in
> >cynicism. Cynicism will never let you down. And yet every morning, I did my little religious
> >number from the church
of
> >Dr. Atkins. I had my bacon. It made no sense -- not to me, anyway -- but
it
> >gave me something I wanted, which happened to be the bacon. Later in the day, I could have
> >my steak -- the fattier, the better -- and take solace from the sacrifice I was making by
> >forswearing bread and pasta. Now, I am experiencing a crisis of faith. Atkins is dead and
> >his secret
is
> >out. He was fat and sick. I want to move on to a new diet, something with bread and pasta that
> >also satisfies my newly reinforced cynicism. All I need is someone to tell me it works.
> >[email protected]
> >
>
> ---
> Kelly Beard, a.k.a. Mr. K.V.B. Liar
 
K

Kyle Legate

Guest
smiles wrote:
>
> I think the key to our "bad" diet is Corn ... >
>
Ancient mayans and aztecs would disagree with you. The key to your bad diet is processed food.
 
S

Smiles

Guest
"Kyle Legate" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> smiles wrote:
> >
> > I think the key to our "bad" diet is Corn ... >
> >
> Ancient mayans and aztecs would disagree with you. The key to your bad
diet
> is processed food.

And others would argue it's pig food ... ;-)

Most processed foods have "high fructose corn syrup" ... which is processed corn ... we could not
eat that much corn to be bad, but they are sucking the bad stuff out and concentrating it!!

s http://boardnbike.com
 
D

David

Guest
"Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine" are more than just guerillas...they're militant!
Keep in mind that they are partially funded and share offices with PETA. Also, from what I read,
they illegally released Dr. A's medical records and have been censured more than once by the AMA(?)
The weight gain prior to death was directly related to the coma. That's indisputable. I know from
personal family experience. And the heart trouble was apparently tied to a viral infection he
suffered from some years prior.

My irritation with this is the (dis)information reported on and considered fact by many news orgs
and the lack of respect to the Atkins family while his body is still warm.

"Dashi" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<C%[email protected]_s54>...
> When Faith Is Toast By Richard Cohen Thursday, February 12, 2004; Page A37
>
> Near where I live is a marvelous bakery. Sometimes I stand outside the window, like some forlorn
> figure from Dickens, and watch people eat their bread, lathering it with butter or jelly or --
> someone stop me! -- cream cheese on a toasted anything. I love bread more than almost anything in
> the world, but I will not have it, cannot have it, have not had it -- all on account of Robert
> Atkins, who died last year at the age of 72, weighing 258 pounds, or 50 to 60 pounds overweight.
> For years, I've been on his diet.
>
>
> The circumstances of Atkins's death are somewhat in dispute. Officially, he died from a fall --
> slipped on ice and hit his head. At the same time, his medical records show that he had a history
> of heart problems and was way overweight when he died. The people who run the Atkins diet industry
> insist that nothing about the diet figured either in Atkins's death, or his history of heart
> problems, and that his obesity at death was due to a fluid buildup caused by the heart problems.
> This is their story and they're sticking to it. My story is that I've been on something like the
> Atkins diet for years. I say "something like" since I never actually read his diet book or
> consulted a doctor of any kind. I simply listened to what my friends were saying and cut out bread
> and pasta and started eating meat. It worked. I lost weight. Sure, I missed my bread. Sure, I
> missed my bagel in the morning. And sure, I missed my pasta, which I enjoyed at least once a day.
> It was tough to give all that up. But in exchange, I got to eat meat, which meant steak, which is
> what I was not supposed to eat until Dr. Atkins, blessed be he, came along and repealed all sorts
> of laws of nature or physics. I loved the guy. I could have bacon. This was Atkins's greatest
> gift. Not only was bacon suddenly okay and not, as it had been before, the precursor of almost-
> instant death, but it was actually good for you. Every morning, I had three slices of delicious
> bacon. What a diet! On weekends, I sometimes had more than three slices, figuring that if three
> slices were good for me, six were even better, a virtual fountain of youth from which I could
> drink each morning of a very, very long life. Now, all of that is being brought into question. A
> group of anti-Atkins guerrilla fighters, the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, which
> advocates vegetarian diets, got hold of the New York City medical examiner's report on Atkins's
> death and went to town with it. They raised all sorts of questions: Why the heart condition? Why
> was he so obese? Did his diet contribute to his heart problems? In other words, could you really
> eat fat and lose weight at the same time -- and stay healthy? After all, 72 is not that old. For
> me -- and countless others -- much depends on the answer to that question, and I'm not talking
> about diet and health. I'm talking instead about gullibility, about wanting to believe something
> so badly that common sense got shoved aside. (Bacon, indeed!) The Atkins diet made me into a
> believer. Here I was, all these years, the sort of person who laughed when some homophobe turned
> out to be gay or some cultural conservative was found in the hay with a 16-year-old. I scoffed at
> people who were always discovering that college sports were corrupt or that "fan" was just another
> word for sucker. Me? I floated above it all. I believed fully and without reservation in cynicism.
> Cynicism will never let you down. And yet every morning, I did my little religious number from the
> church of
> Dr. Atkins. I had my bacon. It made no sense -- not to me, anyway -- but it gave me something I
> wanted, which happened to be the bacon. Later in the day, I could have my steak -- the
> fattier, the better -- and take solace from the sacrifice I was making by forswearing bread
> and pasta. Now, I am experiencing a crisis of faith. Atkins is dead and his secret is out. He
> was fat and sick. I want to move on to a new diet, something with bread and pasta that also
> satisfies my newly reinforced cynicism. All I need is someone to tell me it works.
> [email protected]
 
S

Steven Bornfeld

Guest
David wrote:
> "Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine" are more than just guerillas...they're militant!
> Keep in mind that they are partially funded and share offices with PETA. Also, from what I read,
> they illegally released Dr. A's medical records and have been censured more than once by the
> AMA(?) The weight gain prior to death was directly related to the coma. That's indisputable. I
> know from personal family experience. And the heart trouble was apparently tied to a viral
> infection he suffered from some years prior.
>
> My irritation with this is the (dis)information reported on and considered fact by many news orgs
> and the lack of respect to the Atkins family while his body is still warm.

They didn't illegally release his medical records. They requested them from the hospital,
which improperly released them without proper authorization. Atkins was a public figure. He
made claims for a diet which many feel is at best useful in select instances and at worst
dangerous to many. The diet has become a fad and has been picked up on by many in the food
industry who have a vested interest but no legal responsibility for what could turn out to
be a significant health risk. As such he and his diet are fair game for criticism. If his
diet has merit it will eventually find its place in normal and therapeutic nutrition.
Personally, I'm not betting the farm.

Steve
 
D

D L

Guest
actually, Steve, I think you're right. But isn't the P.C.R.M. part of the investigation? I'm not a
big fan of the diet myself and I have my doubts about it for sure. I've seen some great results
though but I can't imagine being on any diet for any length of time.

As far as any criticism directed toward Dr. A and his diet. Yeah, he's fair game. But it's all in
the timing, I think. But of course we know how PETA lacks tact and have proved themselves time and
again to be complete wacko.

"Steven Bornfeld" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
>
>
> David wrote:
> > "Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine" are more than just guerillas...they're militant!
> > Keep in mind that they are partially funded and share offices with PETA. Also, from what I read,
> > they illegally released Dr. A's medical records and have been censured more than once by the
> > AMA(?) The weight gain prior to death was directly related to the coma. That's indisputable. I
> > know from personal family experience. And the heart trouble was apparently tied to a viral
> > infection he suffered from some years prior.
> >
> > My irritation with this is the (dis)information reported on and considered fact by many news
> > orgs and the lack of respect to the Atkins family while his body is still warm.
>
> They didn't illegally release his medical records. They requested them from the hospital, which
> improperly released them without proper authorization. Atkins was a public figure. He made claims
> for a diet which many feel is at best useful in select instances and at worst dangerous to many.
> The diet has become a fad and has been picked up on by many in the food industry who have a vested
> interest but no legal responsibility for what could turn out to be a significant health risk. As
> such he and his diet are fair game for criticism. If his diet has merit it will eventually find
> its place in normal and therapeutic nutrition. Personally, I'm not betting the farm.
>
> Steve
 
S

Steven Bornfeld

Guest
D L wrote:
> actually, Steve, I think you're right. But isn't the P.C.R.M. part of the investigation? I'm not a
> big fan of the diet myself and I have my doubts about it for sure. I've seen some great results
> though but I can't imagine being on any diet for any length of time.
>
> As far as any criticism directed toward Dr. A and his diet. Yeah, he's fair game. But it's all in
> the timing, I think. But of course we know how PETA lacks tact and have proved themselves time and
> again to be complete wacko.
>

I may have misinterpreted your post. P.C.R.M. may indeed be part of the investigation. I'm
not knowledgeable about laws relating to third party release of private medical information.
There is no question that the hospital is in violation of federal law by the release of the
records. I also know little about P.C.R.M. and its relationship to PETA. Not that it
matters, but I agree with your assessment of PETA. It certainly is insensitive to trash the
man now, but it's going to happen now while the diet is hot; there's a good chance in 5
years no one's going to care.

Steve

Bornfeld" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
>
>>
>>David wrote:
>>
>>>"Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine" are more than just guerillas...they're militant!
>>>Keep in mind that they are partially funded and share offices with PETA. Also, from what I read,
>>>they illegally released Dr. A's medical records and have been censured more than once by the
>>>AMA(?) The weight gain prior to death was directly related to the coma. That's indisputable. I
>>>know from personal family experience. And the heart trouble was apparently tied to a viral
>>>infection he suffered from some years prior.
>>>
>>>My irritation with this is the (dis)information reported on and considered fact by many news orgs
>>>and the lack of respect to the Atkins family while his body is still warm.
>>
>>They didn't illegally release his medical records. They requested them from the hospital, which
>>improperly released them without proper authorization. Atkins was a public figure. He made claims
>>for a diet which many feel is at best useful in select instances and at worst dangerous to many.
>>The diet has become a fad and has been picked up on by many in the food industry who have a vested
>>interest but no legal responsibility for what could turn out to be a significant health risk. As
>>such he and his diet are fair game for criticism. If his diet has merit it will eventually find
>>its place in normal and therapeutic nutrition. Personally, I'm not betting the farm.
>>
>>Steve
>>
>
 

ParsonsBri

New Member
Feb 20, 2004
3
0
0
Interesting study quoted on the Atkins segment tonight on NBC.
It was regarding low fat vs. Atkins or low carb diet. After 6 months, low carb dieters lost significantly more weight. After 12 months, no significant difference in weight loss. Interesting stuff.

I still maintain that it's about portion control, too much soda and processed food. We eat like pigs in this country. I had a cardiac event in 1998 that scared the **** out of me. I controlled my portions and cut out all fast food and soda. I lost 40 pounds and am at 186. I ate all types of foods and was completely satisfied.

just my 2 cents.
 
T

Tom Kunich

Guest
"ParsonsBri" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Interesting study quoted on the Atkins segment tonight on NBC. It was regarding low fat vs. Atkins
> or low carb diet. After 6 months, low carb dieters lost significantly more weight. After 12
> months, no significant difference in weight loss. Interesting stuff.
>
> I still maintain that it's about portion control, too much soda and processed food. We eat like
> pigs in this country. I had a cardiac event in 1998 that scared the **** out of me. I controlled
> my portions and cut out all fast food and soda. I lost 40 pounds and am at 186. I ate all types of
> foods and was completely satisfied.

Yes, you are correct that it is mostly calorie count and not content that makes a good diet
control weight.

But after years of eating like a hog at the trough the question is: which diet can work the best.
Dr. Atkins diet has a fairly rapid weight loss and contrary to what many people theorize, it also
reduces your cholesterol as well. For those who need the proof of the scales to keep them working on
their weight it is a good diet.

NO diet that 'controls' the content of your diet whether it is fat, protein or carbohydrates to a
smaller than recommended value is goo din the long run. Many doctors hype the low fat diet but just
try it some time and you'll discover that your skin dries out and starts flaking off, you begin
having eyesight problems and all other sorts of things that don't make any sense.

Atkins diet is said to drive your body into acidosis and if that's so then it certainly isn't a good
thing to continue for any length of time. There is the chance of causing serious damage to internal
organs over time.

My opinion is that Dr. Atkin's diet is a good way to drop off extra weight fairly rapidly and fairly
painlessly. In the spring I'll sometimes go onto a high protein/low carb diet for a couple of months
and then go back to my regular everything-including-the-kitchen-sink diet for the remainder of the
year. I don't go to extremes and yet the weight falls of surprisingly fast with the Atkins diet.

And I will say this - in my younger days very high protein and low carbs was my regular diet and I
was skinny as a rail and had cholesterol counts in the teens. You can track my medical records and
the more high carb diet I had the high my cholesterol count was until I'm way over the limit now and
I have a low protein/low fat diet.
 
J

James Calivar

Guest
"Steven Bornfeld" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
>
>
> David wrote:
> > "Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine" are more than just guerillas...they're militant!
> > Keep in mind that they are partially funded and share offices with PETA. Also, from what I read,
> > they illegally released Dr. A's medical records and have been censured more than once by the
> > AMA(?) The weight gain prior to death was directly related to the coma. That's indisputable. I
> > know from personal family experience. And the heart trouble was apparently tied to a viral
> > infection he suffered from some years prior.
> >
> > My irritation with this is the (dis)information reported on and considered fact by many news
> > orgs and the lack of respect to the Atkins family while his body is still warm.
>
> They didn't illegally release his medical records. They requested them from the hospital, which
> improperly released them without proper authorization. Atkins was a public figure. He made claims
> for a diet which many feel is at best useful in select instances and at worst dangerous to many.
> The diet has become a fad and has been picked up on by many in the food industry who have a vested
> interest but no legal responsibility for what could turn out to be a significant health risk. As
> such he and his diet are fair game for criticism. If his diet has merit it will eventually find
> its place in normal and therapeutic nutrition. Personally, I'm not betting the farm.
>
> Steve
>

Well said.
 
J

James Calivar

Guest
"Tom Kunich" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> "ParsonsBri" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>
> And I will say this - in my younger days very high protein and low carbs was my regular diet and I
> was skinny as a rail and had cholesterol counts in the teens. You can track my medical records and
> the more high carb diet I had the high my cholesterol count was until I'm way over the limit now
> and I have a low protein/low fat diet.
>
>

But everyone's metabolism shifts with age, so I don't think it's really fair to use the fact that
you ate steak eggs and hotdogs everyday at 18 and compare it the results you get with a more
controlled diet now.
 
D

Dashi

Guest
"David" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> "Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine" are more than just guerillas...they're militant!
> Keep in mind that they are partially funded and share offices with PETA. Also, from what I read,
> they illegally released Dr. A's medical records and have been censured more than once by the
> AMA(?) The weight gain prior to death was directly related to the coma. That's indisputable.

********!

> I know from personal family experience. And the heart trouble was apparently tied to a viral
> infection he suffered from some years prior.

All of the physicans working for the Atkin's foundation will now come out of the woodwork and
continue to claim how healthy and safe the Atkin's diet
is/was!

Just like the physicans that worked for the tobacco industry stated that cigarettes were not
addictive and did not cause disease.

Give a person money and they will swear to anything that you want them to, and say it is the truth.

> My irritation with this is the (dis)information reported on and considered fact by many news orgs
> and the lack of respect to the Atkins family while his body is still warm.

F*ck 'em, it's all about money, the family and members of his organization are raking in millions of
dollars and don't want it to stop.

If you want to pity someone, pity the poor suckers that bought into the Atkin's lie.

Dashi

> "Dashi" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<C%[email protected]_s54>...
>> When Faith Is Toast By Richard Cohen Thursday, February 12, 2004; Page A37
>>
>> Near where I live is a marvelous bakery. Sometimes I stand outside the window, like some forlorn
>> figure from Dickens, and watch people eat their bread, lathering it with butter or jelly or --
>> someone stop me! -- cream cheese on a toasted anything. I love bread more than almost anything in
>> the world, but I will not have it, cannot have it, have not had it -- all on account of Robert
>> Atkins, who died last year at the age of 72, weighing 258 pounds, or 50 to 60 pounds overweight.
>> For years, I've been on his diet.
>>
>>
>> The circumstances of Atkins's death are somewhat in dispute. Officially, he died from a fall --
>> slipped on ice and hit his head. At the same time, his medical records show that he had a history
>> of heart problems and was way overweight when he died. The people who run the Atkins diet
>> industry insist that nothing about the diet figured either in Atkins's death, or his history of
>> heart problems, and that his obesity at death was due to a fluid buildup caused by the heart
>> problems. This is their story and they're sticking to
>> it.My story is that I've been on something like the Atkins diet for years. I say "something like"
>> since I never actually read his diet book or consulted a doctor of any kind. I simply listened
>> to what my friends were saying and cut out bread and pasta and started eating meat. It worked.
>> I lost weight. Sure, I missed my bread. Sure, I missed my bagel in the morning. And sure, I
>> missed my pasta, which I enjoyed at least once a day. It was tough to give all that up. But in
>> exchange, I got to eat meat, which meant steak, which is what I was not supposed to eat until
>> Dr. Atkins, blessed be he, came along and repealed all sorts of laws of nature or physics. I
>> loved the guy. I could have bacon. This was Atkins's greatest gift. Not only was bacon
>> suddenly okay and not, as it had been before, the precursor of almost-instant death, but it
>> was actually good for you. Every morning, I had three slices of delicious bacon. What a diet!
>> On weekends, I sometimes had more than three slices, figuring that if three slices were good
>> for me, six were even better, a virtual fountain of youth from which I could drink each
>> morning of a very, very long life. Now, all of that is being brought into question. A group of
>> anti-Atkins guerrilla fighters, the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, which
>> advocates vegetarian diets, got hold of the New York City medical examiner's report on
>> Atkins's death and went to town with it. They raised all sorts of questions: Why the heart
>> condition? Why was he so obese? Did his diet contribute to his heart problems? In other words,
>> could you really eat fat and lose weight at the same time -- and stay healthy? After all, 72
>> is not that old. For me -- and countless others -- much depends on the answer to that
>> question, and I'm not talking about diet and health. I'm talking instead about gullibility,
>> about wanting to believe something so badly that common sense got shoved aside. (Bacon,
>> indeed!) The Atkins diet made me into a believer. Here I was, all these years, the sort of
>> person who laughed when some homophobe turned out to be gay or some cultural conservative was
>> found in the hay with a 16-year-old. I scoffed at people who were always discovering that
>> college sports were corrupt or that "fan" was just another word for sucker. Me? I floated
>> above it all. I believed fully and without reservation in cynicism. Cynicism will never let
>> you down. And yet every morning, I did my little religious number from the church of
>> Dr. Atkins. I had my bacon. It made no sense -- not to me, anyway -- but it gave me something I
>> wanted, which happened to be the bacon. Later in the day, I could have my steak -- the
>> fattier, the better -- and take solace from the sacrifice I was making by forswearing bread
>> and pasta. Now, I am experiencing a crisis of faith. Atkins is dead and his secret is out. He
>> was fat and sick. I want to move on to a new diet, something with bread and pasta that also
>> satisfies my newly reinforced cynicism. All I need is someone to tell me it works.
>> [email protected]
 
D

Dashi

Guest
"smiles" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
>I agree with what you say US diet ... if we just dumped soda's (diet included) we would be much
>better off. Being an engineer

I guess that explains your poor scientific knowledge.

Just because you say it is cause and effect, doesn't make it true or factual.

Dashi

I use my bod as a
> chemistry set from time to time (not adding chemicals ... just see it's reaction to foods) ...
> went on Atkins and lost weight, my breath always stunk and I would cramp easily, conclusion if the
> diet requires so much additional supplementation it's not great. I use to drink tons of sodas ...
> went to diet and did not lose weight ... went to water and 100% juice products, and lost weight,
> conclusion that although the diet sodas are only 1 cal they react with the body and cause limited
> to no weight loss.
>
> I think the key to our "bad" diet is Corn ... a food product used to fatten farm animals. Look at
> the labels, it's in just about everything!!! It's being used as a "natural sweetener" in just
> about everything ... like cranberry juice (it go tons of corn syrup in it).
>
> s http://boardnbike.com
>
>
>
> "Ken Very Big Liar" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
>> Like this is supposed to be the Final Word. If you have ever seen Dr.
> Atkins on
>> TV and believed he weighed 258lbs, then you're a gullible fool. I guess
> the
>> proof of Atkins or South Beach or Dr. Phil (whatever diet he proposes) or
> anyone
>> else is in the pudding. If you loose weight and your lipid profiles are
> better
>> than what they were, well then there's nothing really to argue. I leave
> room in
>> my opinion for developing science, nothing is set in stone forever, but I
> think
>> that basically Atkins and et al are correct about the US diet - too many
> sugars
>> in the form of sodas and other junk foods and basic inactivity make us
> fat. I
>> mean, people went to low-fat diets and it just made Americans fatter, supposedly.
>>
>> As usual, there are people who will do anything to tear down someone
> else's
>> reputation (see Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine) to further
> their
>> own cause.
>>
>> On Fri, 13 Feb 2004 05:10:58 GMT, "Dashi" <[email protected]> wrote:
>>
>> >When Faith Is Toast By Richard Cohen Thursday, February 12, 2004; Page A37
>> >
>> >Near where I live is a marvelous bakery. Sometimes I stand outside the window, like some
>> >forlorn figure from Dickens, and watch people eat their bread, lathering it with butter or
>> >jelly or -- someone stop me! -- cream cheese on a toasted anything. I love bread more than
>> >almost anything in
> the
>> >world, but I will not have it, cannot have it, have not had it -- all on account of Robert
>> >Atkins, who died last year at the age of 72, weighing
> 258
>> >pounds, or 50 to 60 pounds overweight. For years, I've been on his diet.
>> >
>> >
>> >The circumstances of Atkins's death are somewhat in dispute. Officially,
> he
>> >died from a fall -- slipped on ice and hit his head. At the same time,
> his
>> >medical records show that he had a history of heart problems and was way overweight when he
>> >died. The people who run the Atkins diet industry
> insist
>> >that nothing about the diet figured either in Atkins's death, or his
> history
>> >of heart problems, and that his obesity at death was due to a fluid
> buildup
>> >caused by the heart problems. This is their story and they're sticking to
>> >it.My story is that I've been on something like the Atkins diet for years. I say "something
>> > like" since I never actually read his diet book or
> consulted
>> >a doctor of any kind. I simply listened to what my friends were saying
> and
>> >cut out bread and pasta and started eating meat. It worked. I lost
> weight.
>> >Sure, I missed my bread. Sure, I missed my bagel in the morning. And
> sure, I
>> >missed my pasta, which I enjoyed at least once a day. It was tough to
> give
>> >all that up. But in exchange, I got to eat meat, which meant steak, which
> is
>> >what I was not supposed to eat until Dr. Atkins, blessed be he, came
> along
>> >and repealed all sorts of laws of nature or physics. I loved the guy. I could have bacon. This
>> >was Atkins's greatest gift. Not only was bacon suddenly okay and not, as it had been before, the
>> >precursor of almost-instant death, but it was actually good for you. Every morning, I
> had
>> >three slices of delicious bacon. What a diet! On weekends, I sometimes
> had
>> >more than three slices, figuring that if three slices were good for me,
> six
>> >were even better, a virtual fountain of youth from which I could drink
> each
>> >morning of a very, very long life. Now, all of that is being brought into question. A group of
>> >anti-Atkins guerrilla fighters, the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine,
> which
>> >advocates vegetarian diets, got hold of the New York City medical
> examiner's
>> >report on Atkins's death and went to town with it. They raised all sorts
> of
>> >questions: Why the heart condition? Why was he so obese? Did his diet contribute to his heart
>> >problems? In other words, could you really eat
> fat
>> >and lose weight at the same time -- and stay healthy? After all, 72 is
> not
>> >that old. For me -- and countless others -- much depends on the answer to that question, and I'm
>> >not talking about diet and health. I'm talking instead about gullibility, about wanting to
>> >believe something so badly that
> common
>> >sense got shoved aside. (Bacon, indeed!) The Atkins diet made me into a believer. Here I was,
>> >all these years, the sort of person who laughed
> when
>> >some homophobe turned out to be gay or some cultural conservative was
> found
>> >in the hay with a 16-year-old. I scoffed at people who were always discovering that college
>> >sports were corrupt or that "fan" was just
> another
>> >word for sucker. Me? I floated above it all. I believed fully and without reservation in
>> >cynicism. Cynicism will never let you down. And yet every morning, I did my little religious
>> >number from the church
> of
>> >Dr. Atkins. I had my bacon. It made no sense -- not to me, anyway -- but
> it
>> >gave me something I wanted, which happened to be the bacon. Later in the day, I could have my
>> >steak -- the fattier, the better -- and take solace from the sacrifice I was making by
>> >forswearing bread and pasta. Now, I am experiencing a crisis of faith. Atkins is dead and his
>> >secret
> is
>> >out. He was fat and sick. I want to move on to a new diet, something with bread and pasta that
>> >also satisfies my newly reinforced cynicism. All I need is someone to tell me it works.
>> >[email protected]
>> >
>>
>> ---
>> Kelly Beard, a.k.a. Mr. K.V.B. Liar
 
T

Tom Kunich

Guest
"James Calivar" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
>
> "Tom Kunich" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
> > "ParsonsBri" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> >
> > And I will say this - in my younger days very high protein and low carbs
was
> > my regular diet and I was skinny as a rail and had cholesterol counts in
the
> > teens. You can track my medical records and the more high carb diet I
had
> > the high my cholesterol count was until I'm way over the limit now and I have a low protein/low
> > fat diet.
>
> But everyone's metabolism shifts with age, so I don't think it's really
fair to
> use the fact that you ate steak eggs and hotdogs everyday at 18 and
compare it
> the results you get with a more controlled diet now.

Well, that's true but I had the same doctor for about 30 years and you can plot my cholesterol and
it started up in my late 30's when I more or less changed to vegetarian diets.
 
T

Tom Kunich

Guest
"Dashi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s02...
>
> If you want to pity someone, pity the poor suckers that bought into the Atkin's lie.

I suppose you mean the millions of people who used his diet to lose weigh rapidly and safely. And
those who discovered that just like he claimed, their cholesterol and lipid counts dropped to
safe levels.

I don't think that any diet that has extremes is good, but it is beyond question that the Atkins
diet is effective and safe if you don't overdo it.