Attention Rural Whites:



N

Not Available

Guest
Is possum really a delicacy for you?

Please don't consider this a trollish or inflammatory post, I'm genuinely curious.

How is it prepared? Are they farm raised? Does it taste like chicken?

Thanks! :)
 
J

Jmcquown

Guest
Not Available wrote:
> Is possum really a delicacy for you?
>
> Please don't consider this a trollish or inflammatory post, I'm genuinely curious.
>
> How is it prepared? Are they farm raised? Does it taste like chicken?
>
> Thanks! :)

A confit of oppossum with red potatoes is to die for. Or oppossum 'strips', stir-fried in sesame oil
with snow peas, zucchini, baby corn, sliced pattypan and served with a wasasbi sauce... it's
incredible.

Unfortunately oppossum has been so over-hunted as to have become a delicacy we 'rural' folks can no
longer afford. Roadkill ain't what it used to be. (laughing) Now let me tell you how to kill, clean
and bake a raccoon... and how to get a LIFE.

Jill in the Southern U.S.
 
R

Royal

Guest
On Fri, 13 Feb 2004 20:05:28 -0800 (PST), [email protected] (Not
Available) wrote:

>Is possum really a delicacy for you?
>
>Please don't consider this a trollish or inflammatory post, I'm genuinely curious.
>
>How is it prepared? Are they farm raised? Does it taste like chicken?
>
My father always told me that when he was young and living in Casa, Arkansas, if there was to be
meat on the table he and my uncles would have to go hunt it. My grandfather always told them before
they went out hunting to bring back a possum because he had fond memories from his childhood of a
good stewed possum with potatoes and wild onions. However, my grandmother always told them that if
they brought back a possum she would give them a switching, because she wasn't about to cook one.
She said that when she was a child she was walking home from school one day and came upon a dead cow
in the road. It was bloated and stinking and and the vultures were on it, and she gave it a wide
berth. But before she could get past it a possum crawled out of the stomach cavity. That was enough
for my father and my uncles. My grandfather went to his grave never having had the pleasure of his
pot of stewed possum.
 
Z

Zxcvbob

Guest
Not Available wrote:

> Is possum really a delicacy for you?
>
> Please don't consider this a trollish or inflammatory post, I'm genuinely curious.
>
> How is it prepared? Are they farm raised? Does it taste like chicken?
>
> Thanks! :)

A wonderful message was posted on just this subject a few years ago. Here it is again in all
its glory:

> From: "DCJM" <[email protected]> Subject: Re: Possum recipes Date: 2000/03/09 Message-ID:
> <[email protected]>#1/1 References: <[email protected]
> 165.iap.bryant.webtv.net> X-Priority: 3 X-Server-Date: 10 Mar 2000 02:40:46 GMT X-MimeOLE:
> Produced By Microsoft MimeOLE V5.00.2919.6600 Organization: MindSpring Enterprises X-MSMail-
> Priority: Normal Newsgroups: rec.food.cooking
>
> Rodger, First you have to get a good one, best if it is about half grown. Put it in a cage and
> fatten it up on buttermilk for a few months. That will get the juices flowing when you cook it.
> Now for the important part when you skin it never, never cut the tail off it is like beaver tail
> and a true delicacy. Put in center of a large black cast iron skillet Tuck the legs under and wrap
> the tail around over the nose on the right side for balance Put yams around the side with carrots
> for some flavor Place in oven at 375 degrees and bake until tender and a golden brown. Be sure to
> baste during the baking process with a mixture of lard, salt, pepper and buttermilk for that true
> down home flavor. Remove from oven, place in the center of the table call the wife and kids to
> dinner and enjoy your feast.
>
> If you have never tried this one you don't know what you are missing. Also have excellent recipes
> for stewed crow, coon, and rattlesnake.
>
> Sincerely DCJM's Bubba

Best regards, Bob
 
K

Kalanamak

Guest
Royal wrote: <snip> It was
> bloated and stinking and and the vultures were on it, and she gave it a wide berth. But before she
> could get past it a possum crawled out of the stomach cavity.

Round here the suburban legend is that possums will hunt and kill rats, so I smile when I see a
possum. Rats are so common out here, its a wonder no one has started to market some expensive
terrier as a ratter. I'd think about one. blacksalt
 
F

Frogleg

Guest
>Not Available wrote:
>
>> Is possum really a delicacy for you?
>>
>> Please don't consider this a trollish or inflammatory post, I'm genuinely curious.
>>
>> How is it prepared? Are they farm raised? Does it taste like chicken?

Um, why is this question specifically directed to "Rural Whites"?
 
R

Ravinwulf

Guest
On Sat, 14 Feb 2004 14:56:59 -0800, kalanamak <[email protected]>
wrote:

>Round here the suburban legend is that possums will hunt and kill rats, so I smile when I see a
>possum. Rats are so common out here, its a wonder no one has started to market some expensive
>terrier as a ratter.

Get a ferret. They excel at rodent killing.

Tracy R.
 
L

Loki

Guest
il Sat, 14 Feb 2004 14:56:59 -0800, kalanamak ha scritto:
>
> Round here the suburban legend is that possums will hunt and kill rats, so I smile when I see a
> possum. Rats are so common out here, its a wonder no one has started to market some expensive
> terrier as a ratter. I'd think about one. blacksalt

I wish, our possums only eat trees and leaves and destroy our bush. If they ate rats that would help
reduce one other pest. I suspect they are vegetarian -the aussie ones anyway.
--
Cheers, Loki [ Brevity is the soul of wit. W.Shakespeare ]
 
R

Ravinwulf

Guest
On Sun, 15 Feb 2004 12:26:37 GMT, Frogleg <[email protected]> wrote:

>>Not Available wrote:
>>
>>> Is possum really a delicacy for you?
>>>
>>> Please don't consider this a trollish or inflammatory post, I'm genuinely curious.
>>>
>>> How is it prepared? Are they farm raised? Does it taste like chicken?
>
>Um, why is this question specifically directed to "Rural Whites"?

Because it's a troll. :p

Tracy R.
 
L

Loki

Guest
il Sun, 15 Feb 2004 12:26:37 GMT, Frogleg ha scritto:

> >Not Available wrote:
> >
> >> Is possum really a delicacy for you?
> >>
> >> Please don't consider this a trollish or inflammatory post, I'm genuinely curious.
> >>
> >> How is it prepared? Are they farm raised? Does it taste like chicken?
>
> Um, why is this question specifically directed to "Rural Whites"?

What is a rural white?
--
Cheers, Loki [ Brevity is the soul of wit. W.Shakespeare ]
 
B

Bob White

Guest
On 15-Feb-2004, "Loki" <[email protected]> wrote:

> > Um, why is this question specifically directed to "Rural Whites"?
>
> What is a rural white?
> --

Rural is the second most popular given name for males born to southern families with the surname
White. The most popular is Bob; Bob White can be found in abundance.
 
F

Frogleg

Guest
On Sun, 15 Feb 2004 07:47:09 -0800 (PST), [email protected] (Not
Available) wrote:

>Frogleg asks:
>>Um, why is this question specifically directed to "Rural Whites"?
>
>Possum consumption is indigenous to that particular region/species.

You think?
 
B

Blake Murphy

Guest
On Sat, 14 Feb 2004 00:49:39 -0600, "jmcquown"
<[email protected]> wrote:

>Not Available wrote:
>> Is possum really a delicacy for you?
>>
>> Please don't consider this a trollish or inflammatory post, I'm genuinely curious.
>>
>> How is it prepared? Are they farm raised? Does it taste like chicken?
>>
>> Thanks! :)
>
>A confit of oppossum with red potatoes is to die for. Or oppossum 'strips', stir-fried in sesame
>oil with snow peas, zucchini, baby corn, sliced pattypan and served with a wasasbi sauce... it's
>incredible.
>
>Unfortunately oppossum has been so over-hunted as to have become a delicacy we 'rural' folks can no
>longer afford. Roadkill ain't what it used to be. (laughing) Now let me tell you how to kill, clean
>and bake a raccoon... and how to get a LIFE.
>
>Jill in the Southern U.S.
>
don't forget shake 'n' bake for varmints.

your pal, blake