Audax Alpine Classic 2006

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by neon, Jan 22, 2006.

  1. neon

    neon New Member

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    Wow, what tough day. 40c! I try do 130, but I stop part way up the gap on return leg and call someone come get me. But I was hearten by the fact I was not the only one. But well run ride. Well done to all of Audax Volunteers. Let hope it's bit cooler next year.
     
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  2. idler

    idler New Member

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    Good effort all the same neon, I hope to have a crack at it next year. What sort of prep have you been doing?
     
  3. neon

    neon New Member

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    I did mostly endurance training from the September them more hill training from late December to early January. I think I just became a bit dehydrated, I weighted about kilogram less when I weight myself when I got home again. I guess in weather like that you have to drink every 5 minutes.
     
  4. idler

    idler New Member

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    You were stiff to cop heat like that. You can only drink so much in the lead up so it's not really something you can prepare for. I'm coming off an all time low fitness level so I reckon the 12 month lead up is pretty realistic. 40c, that would finish me, no matter how fit I get.
     
  5. Bikesoiler

    Bikesoiler New Member

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    Well done for giving it a go. The heat stopped many people on Sunday.
    It wasn't ideal weather for a 200km ride in the hills but I'm glad I did it. It was a well run event with great support, big thanks to the AUDAX volunteers.
     
  6. su22

    su22 New Member

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    the only negative remark i have to make is about a very small number of cyclists dropping rubbish on the road. i was annoyed to see gel/bar wrappers and foil on the road. the large majority of people carry their rubbish with them, but those who litter shouldn't be allowed to ride if they can't respect the roads they're riding on.

    otherwise it was a very well organised event. the temperature reading on my climb data when i got back to Bright at 1pm was 49degC!!! I'm not sure if that's because i had my bike racked in the sun, or if it really was 49deg. Coming back on Tawonga was 42degC, and it sure felt like it. the hot weather will probably be here to stay with global warming. sorry to be all doom and gloom in this post! it was a great event, good fun, the creek was awesome after
     
  7. Guvnor

    Guvnor New Member

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    Congratulations to all those who entered the Alpine Classic. I live in NE Vic. Whilst i have not ridden the Classic I know the area and I know the heat. It doesn't matter whether you didn't finish or you timed out - you had ago & for that you should be congratulated. With more miles under my belt I want to 'ave a go too.

    Next year the weather might be in our favour but heh "...this is Australia", it's summer and it's expected to be hot!:cool:
     
  8. Guvnor

    Guvnor New Member

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    Re Audax riding. What types of bikes are you people riding? Out & out road bikes, touring bikes, hybrids? There are so many types of bikes out there where do you start.

    Cheeers, Guv.
     
  9. athman

    athman New Member

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    Neon. You are certainly not alone. I was with 6 other riders about 3kms from the top of Fall Creek. Of these, I think only two made it all the way back. I got to the top of FC, didn't feel very well, and pulled out. I knew I could have made it back to Tawonga but wouldn't be able to make it over the last climb.

    I completed the whole 130k last year and was aiming to do better this time. Oh well, there's always next year.:)
     
  10. athman

    athman New Member

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    Most use lightweight road bikes. Some use mountain bikes with road tyres. If you are new to riding in the hills think about getting a triple chain ring.

    I started riding about 18 months ago at about 43 yrs old. The first 3 months I used a 10 yr old steel frame hybrid we had lying in the garage until it basically wore out. I then got an entry level Giant OCR 3 for about $850 bucks and better pedals for about $200. I've since done about 6,000 km and I spent about $800 just before the Alpine Classic. I had worn out the drivetrain and replaced everything with better quality and more durable gear. One wheel rim was cracking so I got two much stonger rims hand- built and it has made a difference.
    It seems you can start relatively cheaply and pay as you go, as I did, or you can start at $2.5k- $5k for a better set up to begin with. I'm happy with my decision. I never knew I'd be doing so much riding, and I do enjoy it.
     
  11. Guvnor

    Guvnor New Member

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    Thanks Athman. I'm afraid that I have always preferred to spend the dollars on brand names & usually the best that I can afford (you could say that i'm a snob) but I'd prefer to pay for quality than accept a poor imitation.

    I have been looking at the Cannondale R600, Felt F75/F65, Giant OCR1 but haven't ridden any yet.

    I too have an old (15 yrs) cr-mo roadie lying in the shed, which I have been told is a reasonable frame. How many dollars would you throw at it (& what spec. components) before it becomes an unviable proposition?
    It rolls a long quite nicely but obviously needs an upgrade.

    Cheers for now, Guvnor
     
  12. badsac

    badsac New Member

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    Mine read 48 when I got back to Bright. 42 as well up Tawonga. That's just stupidly hot. And I turned it off as soon as I got back, so that 48 was on the road somewhere out there.

    I was doing the 200 but pulled out at Bright as well. Just got really sick going back up Tawonga then pulled a hammy from pedalling through a cramp. I was feeling so good at the top of Falls Creek as well. I think I wrecked myself by not drinking enough coming off Falls Creek. I was to busy having fun on the corners that I didn't realise that it takes almost 45 minutes to get down and I should be drinking more.

    This was my first year, so inexperience got me. Next year I'll spend more time drinking going down falls creek, and less time getting talked to by motorbike marshalls. ;)
     
  13. artemidorus

    artemidorus New Member

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    Cycling computers in the sun routinely get hotter than the air temperature, often quite a lot hotter if you are going slowly or are stationary. That said, I don't doubt that it was a real bastard of a day!
     
  14. badsac

    badsac New Member

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    Riders in the sun get hotter than air temperature as well. ;)
     
  15. Bikesoiler

    Bikesoiler New Member

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    Buy quality gear & it will last you a long time. My bike is ~15 years old, has had only minor upgrades & is still going strong. I would have to spend stupid $'s to get anything lighter now.

    Fit is more important than anything else! Even more important than colour! :p Buy the bike that fits YOU best.

    Start with your old beastie. Treat it to new tyres & a complete service. Don't replace anything other than tyres,tubes, cables, bar tape or mybe the seat if it's biting you.
    Once you've spent some time on it & maybe got measured/checked your fitting, then you'll know what to look for in a new bike.

    Oh, keep the old bike as a 'backup' or convert it to singlespeed/fixed after getting someting new! ;)
     
  16. athman

    athman New Member

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    Aparrently, so do tyres. While we were at the Falls creek checkpoint we were advised to park our bikes out of direct sunlight. There had been incidences of tubes expanding and blowing up if left in the sun. It sounded funny at the time, of course it wouldn't be so funny if it happened to me :eek:
     
  17. athman

    athman New Member

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    Aparrently, so do tyres. While we were at the Falls creek checkpoint we were advised to park our bikes out of direct sunlight. There had been incidences of tubes expanding and blowing up if left in the sun. It sounded funny at the time, of course it wouldn't be so funny if it happened to me :eek:
     
  18. Guvnor

    Guvnor New Member

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    "Start with your old beastie. Treat it to new tyres & a complete service. Don't replace anything other than tyres,tubes, cables, bar tape or mybe the seat if it's biting you."

    Thanks Bikesoiler (interesting name - I don't think I will ask how you got it:D )
    I dragged the "old beastie" from the dark forgotten corner of the shed, covered in cobwebs & definitely in need of some tlc.
    To quote a tv ad - "...I like the shape". A horizontal top tube, no compact geometry here!

    I will heed your advice, give her a good service, new tyres, tubes, brakes, cables etc and get out there & put some more miles on the old girl.

    Cheers for now, Guvnor.
     
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