Audible Warning

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Andymorris, Apr 5, 2003.

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  1. Andymorris

    Andymorris Guest

    What sort of audible warnings does u.r.c like to use.

    I have several.

    "Coming by" - Useful on shared use paths when passing pedestrians to politely let them know I am
    about to pass

    "Oy Oy" - To alert other traffic to my presence, when they may be about to pull out in front of me.

    "Geroutofit" - To alert other traffic to my presence, when they are about to pull out in
    front of me.

    "Anker" - To alert other traffic to my presence, when they have just pulled out in front of me.

    --
    Andy Morris

    AndyAtJinkasDotFreeserve.Co.UK

    Love this: Put an end to Outlook Express's messy quotes
    http://home.in.tum.de/~jain/software/oe-quotefix/
     
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  2. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    > What sort of audible warnings does u.r.c like to use.

    Campag freewheel* for pedestrians (slightly back-pedalled for the deafer/more stubborn ones). Loud
    but very polite and civilised. Beautifully subtle because I'm just alerting them of my presence, not
    asking or implying that people should make way: I don't think they should have to at all but it's
    nice if they do.

    OIIIYYYYY!!!!!!!!!! (explosive shout in a cockney accent at top of voice) for motorists.

    WhooooooarrrrrOOOOIWWshttt - whist I'm being squeazed within an inch of my life by a car passing
    too close.

    * old steel 8sp freehubs were louder than the new alloy 9sp jobs :-(

    ~PB
     
  3. Andymorris

    Andymorris Guest

    Pete Biggs wrote:
    >> What sort of audible warnings does u.r.c like to use.
    >
    > Campag freewheel* for pedestrians (slightly back-pedalled for the deafer/more stubborn ones). Loud
    > but very polite and civilised. Beautifully subtle because I'm just alerting them of my presence,
    > not asking or implying that people should make way: I don't think they should have to at all but
    > it's nice if they do.
    >

    Mines a shimano, so it lacks that feature. Way back in my youth you could clack the brake levers but
    that dont work on sti's

    --
    Andy Morris

    AndyAtJinkasDotFreeserve.Co.UK

    Love this: Put an end to Outlook Express's messy quotes
    http://home.in.tum.de/~jain/software/oe-quotefix/
     
  4. Gadget

    Gadget Guest

    2.4 Decibels of electronic horn usually wakes anyone out of their revelery. Mines a hand built and
    is bl**dy loud. People tend to notice it in and out of cars.

    Gadget
     
  5. Tony W

    Tony W Guest

    "AndyMorris" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > What sort of audible warnings does u.r.c like to use.

    For pedestrians I like the old fashioned bell. Most know what it means.

    For motorists little penetrates their cocooned world so audible warnings -- 'Dick-head' is my
    current abuse of choice -- are normally more to let off my steam than to influence their
    future action.

    T
     
  6. Tony W

    Tony W Guest

    "Gadget" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > 2.4 Decibels of electronic horn usually wakes anyone out of their
    revelery.
    > Mines a hand built and is bl**dy loud. People tend to notice it in and out of cars.

    2.4 dB? Some mistake, Shirley.

    T
     
  7. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    Tony W <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > 2.4 dB? Some mistake, Shirley.
    >

    Sorry, I didn't hear that ;-)

    Tony

    --
    http://www.raven-family.com

    "The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable man persists in trying to
    adapt the world to himself. Therefore, all progress depends on the unreasonable man." -- George
    Bernard Shaw
     
  8. Niv

    Niv Guest

    I usually just say "ting-a-ling" loud enough to be heard when I come up behind peds. This usually
    raises a smile. After all, who wants a heavy bell on their lightweight bike (joke).

    As a kid, I always wanted & finally got, one of those bells that had the "clapper" on the outside &
    gave a single, extended, ring tone. Much simpler than the multiple ring ones with the internal mech.

    Niv.

    "AndyMorris" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > What sort of audible warnings does u.r.c like to use.
    >
    > I have several.
    >
    > "Coming by" - Useful on shared use paths when passing pedestrians to politely let them know I am
    > about to pass
    >
    > "Oy Oy" - To alert other traffic to my presence, when they may be about to pull out in
    > front of me.
    >
    > "Geroutofit" - To alert other traffic to my presence, when they are about
    to
    > pull out in front of me.
    >
    > "Anker" - To alert other traffic to my presence, when they have just
    pulled
    > out in front of me.
    >
    >
    > --
    > Andy Morris
    >
    >
    > AndyAtJinkasDotFreeserve.Co.UK
    >
    >
    > Love this: Put an end to Outlook Express's messy quotes
    > http://home.in.tum.de/~jain/software/oe-quotefix/
     
  9. Call Me Bob

    Call Me Bob Guest

    On Sun, 6 Apr 2003 00:53:30 +0100, "AndyMorris" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >What sort of audible warnings does u.r.c like to use. I have several.
    >
    >"Anker" - To alert other traffic to my presence, when they have just pulled out in front of me.

    Since the purchase of my friendly blue handlebar hippo, my usual warning is "SQUEAKY- SQUEAK!!".

    Of course, Anker does still get its fair share of usage, but I'm striving to keep those utterances
    under my breath.

    Bob
    --
    Mail address is spam trapped To reply by email remove the beverage
     
  10. On Sun, 06 Apr 2003 00:53:30 +0100, AndyMorris did issue forth:

    > What sort of audible warnings does u.r.c like to use.

    Commuting: "Aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaargh!"

    Off-road: "On your left!", "On your right!", "Hold your line!",
    "Aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaargh!", "Tree!"

    --
    Huw Pritchard Replace bounce with huw to reply by mail
     
  11. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    Niv <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I usually just say "ting-a-ling" loud enough to be heard when I come up behind peds. This usually
    > raises a smile. After all, who wants a heavy bell on their lightweight bike (joke).
    >

    Sounds like your "bell" weighs a lot more than my bell ;-)

    Tony

    --
    http://www.raven-family.com

    "The reasonable man adapts himself to his bike; the unreasonable man persists in trying to adapt his
    bike to himself. Therefore, all progress depends on the unreasonable man." with apologies to George
    Bernard Shaw
     
  12. Peter B

    Peter B Guest

    "Niv" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I usually just say "ting-a-ling" loud enough to be heard when I come up behind peds. This usually
    > raises a smile. After all, who wants a heavy bell on their lightweight bike (joke).

    Reminds me of when I politely called "Good morning" as I approached 2 walkers from behind on a tow
    path. They moved over and I thanked them politely and with a smile but was met with a comment about
    bells being obligatory.

    Now what is it about some people? Until that point I'd had a nice Sunday morning ride and was on the
    homeward stretch having caused no offence or danger to others and none had come my way. Presumably
    these people had also come out to enjoy weather, scenery and tranquillity and our meeting was a
    transient event of no great consequence but no, they had to be antagonistic.

    So I stopped further along on a pretext so they could overtake me and in turn I'd have to overtake
    them. For this overtake I called "Ding-a-ling, ding-a-ling", they duly made way and I enquired if
    they preferred that warning which elicited a smile from them and the comment "That's better".

    A better outcome than from another meeting with man, woman and dog where the bell issue was raised
    and ended up with the man threatening to push a stick into my front wheel, kind of think I'd gained
    the moral and legal high ground at that point :)

    When approaching horses from behind I call out "Good morning/afternoon" in plenty of time, not only
    out of politeness but also self-preservation. The riders are almost always grateful and polite in
    return. On one occasion before I judged I was in earshot the rear rider of a group turned round and
    looked at me, thinking along the lines of "she's seen me no need to warn of my presence" I didn't
    call, as I rode by her she said "I'd appreciate it if you called out to us", I stated that as she
    had already seen me there seemed little point but she just repeated herself. Oh well!

    I must say that altercations with walkers and horse riders are very rare, most respond to politeness
    and a smile in kind but the minority do make me consider buying an Air Zound.

    Pete
     
  13. Trog Woolley

    Trog Woolley Guest

    I start off with a polite "ting" on the bell. If that doesn't work I blow my 100+dB whistle. I use
    this in traffic too and sometimes the cagers even hear it. This depends how load their music is.
    Observation. The louder the music eminating from the car, the crappier it is.

    --
    Trog Woolley | trog at trog hyphen oz dot demon dot co dot uk (A Croweater back residing in Pommie
    Land with Linux) Isis Astarte Diana Hecate Demeter Kali Inanna
     
  14. Scott

    Scott Guest

    "AndyMorris" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > What sort of audible warnings does u.r.c like to use.
    >

    I'm usually very quiet, but have been known to bark 'HEY!' in a startled sort of way in the event of
    a close call. It's not even really directed at whoever cut me up; just an exclamation of surprise.

    After years of riding in the city I now live in the country, and have gone mostly mute except to say
    hello to the occasional cyclist, and horse riders.
     
  15. Simon Mason

    Simon Mason Guest

    "AndyMorris" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > What sort of audible warnings does u.r.c like to use.
    >

    Varying amounts of front brake sounds, from a slight squeak to an ear splitting banshee squeal.

    To traffic turning left in front of me to cars pulling out, a loud "Look Out"!
    --
    Simon Mason Anlaby East Yorkshire. 53°44'N 0°26'W http://www.simonmason.karoo.net
     
  16. J-P.S

    J-P.S Guest

    On Sun, 6 Apr 2003 00:53:30 +0100, AndyMorris scrawled: ) What sort of audible warnings does u.r.c
    like to use.

    Yesterday I hammered on a window and shouted "indicate!" A few days previously I was inches away
    from shouting "Mirror - signal - then

    I am considering getting a ting-ting bell. A friend of mine used to have a honky horn, because bells
    often sound prissy and the horn was at least self-effacing. And loud.

    J-P
    --
    6. What are the three bones found in the ear? ... A. Goldilocks and the Three Bears B. Alice's
    Adventures in Wonderland C. 1984 D. The South Park Christmas special
     
  17. "Simon Mason" <[email protected]> wrote: ( Varying amounts of front brake sounds, from a
    slight squeak to an ear ) splitting banshee squeal.

    Yes, and isn't it annoying on those days when the weather makes the brakes preternaturally silent?
     
  18. Marc

    Marc Guest

    AndyMorris <[email protected]> wrote:

    > What sort of audible warnings does u.r.c like to use.
    >
    > I have several.

    A ting from a flick bell

    A blast from an Airzound

    A "On your right!"

    The first is normally ignored, the second 2 results in some sort of leviational sturry, and the
    third has variable effects with random directions.
     
  19. James Hodson

    James Hodson Guest

    On Sun, 6 Apr 2003 00:53:30 +0100, "AndyMorris" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >What sort of audible warnings does u.r.c like to use.
    >

    'Anker: if not put in to much danger but possibly forced to move or brake a bit. Tosser: used as
    above. Thank you: used as above but must be said in a sarcastic manner.

    One, more or all of the above can be used one after the other if neccessary. They're most often used
    against the inconsiderate.

    Thank you: occasionally used to indicate thanks.

    Change gear, good morning/afternoon etc used when asking permision to pass peds or horse riders.

    $**&)!"%*^* ME: used in near death situations.

    James

    --
    A credit limit is NOT a target.
     
  20. Gadget

    Gadget Guest

    "Gadget" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > 2.4 Decibels of electronic horn usually wakes anyone out of their
    revelery.
    > Mines a hand built and is bl**dy loud. People tend to notice it in and out of cars.
    >
    > Gadget
    >
    >
    Oooopppppps,

    I think that should have read 2.4MDecibels, that is what the specs for the horn read.
     
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