Australian importer/assembler/manufacturer of touring bicycles ?

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by AndrewJ, May 22, 2006.

  1. AndrewJ

    AndrewJ Guest

    Is there anywhere in Australia a bike store or company that specialises
    in touring bicycles? I want something that can handle non-bitumen while
    carrying a fairly substantial load, both front and rear panniers. Don't
    need suspension either front or rear.

    I guess my ideal is something like a Koga-Miyata world-traveller or
    similar. Not fussed about aluminium frames but would probably prefer
    steel.

    I've been searching for quite a while, and have not found a source.

    At the moment it seems the only path is either to import a frame from
    Europe and assemble here, or to go there and buy one. Which is
    interesting in one sense since I am pretty sure all the hardware is
    created either in China or Taiwan.

    Any leads I would be grateful. I will summarise what I find.

    Many thanks in advance.
     
    Tags:


  2. Travis

    Travis Guest

    AndrewJ wrote:
    > Is there anywhere in Australia a bike store or company that specialises
    > in touring bicycles? I want something that can handle non-bitumen while
    > carrying a fairly substantial load, both front and rear panniers. Don't
    > need suspension either front or rear.


    Have you considered a recumbent trike from, say, Greenspeed?

    >From what I hear recumbents are much more comfortable for really long

    distance rides and can carry quite heavy loads.

    Travis
     
  3. AndrewJ wrote:

    > Is there anywhere in Australia a bike store or company that specialises
    > in touring bicycles?


    In Sydney, Cheeky Monkey near central station list tourers alongside
    commuters, utility, loadbikes and courierbikes as their interest /
    specialty. I'm getting a Surly Long Haul Trucker built up for me
    through them with 26" (frame size dictates this for me). They also
    have touring bikes built up for $1500 from another frame. They would
    be interested on working up a tourer for you. I've gone for a LHT due
    to the sheer number of braze ons, the steel, and the wide spread use in
    the touring community. Surly frames are available from a local
    supplier, so there's no individual importation issues.

    > I want something that can handle non-bitumen while
    > carrying a fairly substantial load, both front and rear panniers. Don't
    > need suspension either front or rear.


    CM seem to have done this repeatedly. I'd recomment looking at the
    Surly LHT or the Surly Crosscheck. LBS which stock Trek may have a 520
    or 520 international on the floor to look at. The 520 would need gear
    and tyre changes before being suitable for the off road uses.

    > I guess my ideal is something like a Koga-Miyata world-traveller or
    > similar. Not fussed about aluminium frames but would probably prefer
    > steel.


    Try the bike reviews off the Bicycle NSW website of bikes, there are
    reviews of tourers in there with suppliers of the bikes listed.

    > I've been searching for quite a while, and have not found a source.


    As mentioned in another post, there's also the option of getting a
    touring recumbant or recumbant trike. These frames are built in
    Australia.

    > At the moment it seems the only path is either to import a frame from
    > Europe and assemble here, or to go there and buy one. Which is
    > interesting in one sense since I am pretty sure all the hardware is
    > created either in China or Taiwan.
    >
    > Any leads I would be grateful. I will summarise what I find.


    Can I also recommend the Phreds touring email list? Its very American
    but there seems to be a large number of Aussies on there too.

    Finally, most hybrid/commuter/utility frames can be used for touring,
    as can many MTB frames. Long chain stay road frames are also useful
    for touring. A dedicated touring frame is an idea, a good idea, but
    there's no reason why you can't start overnighting with an existing
    bike.

    yours for touring,
    Sam R.
     
  4. Bleve

    Bleve Guest

    AndrewJ wrote:
    > Is there anywhere in Australia a bike store or company that specialises
    > in touring bicycles? I want something that can handle non-bitumen while
    > carrying a fairly substantial load, both front and rear panniers. Don't
    > need suspension either front or rear.
    >
    > I guess my ideal is something like a Koga-Miyata world-traveller or
    > similar. Not fussed about aluminium frames but would probably prefer
    > steel.


    Trek 520 is a steel touring frame. Cannondale T2000 and T800 are Al
    tourers.
    Fuji also do a steel tourer .. we've sold a few of them recently. How
    hard have you been looking?

    Ian Christie's shop was a good tourers shop but he shut up a few years
    ago now (Melbourne), but any half decent LBS will be able to help you.
    I think he shut because there's not that much demand and it's not
    enough to sustain a shop, but that's a guess.

    Have a look through "Bicycle Australia" magazine, it's the tatty one
    hidden behind Ride in the newsagent.
     
  5. In aus.bicycle on 22 May 2006 00:11:26 -0700
    AndrewJ <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Is there anywhere in Australia a bike store or company that specialises
    > in touring bicycles? I want something that can handle non-bitumen while
    > carrying a fairly substantial load, both front and rear panniers. Don't
    > need suspension either front or rear.
    >


    If you are in Sydney, you could try Cheeky Monkey near Central
    Station.

    They are into bikes as transport, and do various touring bikes

    http://www.cheekymonkey.com.au/transport home.htm

    eg Allegro touring
    Allegro Touring $1500

    Pretty much the same bike as the fuji touring. Nice riding steel
    frame, Tiagra shifters, deore deraileur. 25kg rated rear rack. Shimano
    hub. Mudguard capable.

    THey do Surly for more offroad type touring too.

    Zebee
     
  6. In aus.bicycle on 22 May 2006 00:17:06 -0700
    Travis <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > AndrewJ wrote:
    >> Is there anywhere in Australia a bike store or company that specialises
    >> in touring bicycles? I want something that can handle non-bitumen while
    >> carrying a fairly substantial load, both front and rear panniers. Don't
    >> need suspension either front or rear.

    >
    > Have you considered a recumbent trike from, say, Greenspeed?
    >
    >>From what I hear recumbents are much more comfortable for really long

    > distance rides and can carry quite heavy loads.


    Major problem with trikes is ground clearance. Not sure I'd want to
    use one on your typical Oz "not graded for years and corrugated to
    hell" dirt road. For bitumen touring I think they'd be great.

    My Bacchetta Giro can carry 2 sets of panniers - rear and under seat -
    and a seat back back or rack top bag. 2 bottle mount points plus
    places to put more, and fittings for mudguards. People tour on them
    a lot although the Yanks seem to think the long wheel base two wheel
    bents are better for that.

    Zebee
     
  7. Humbug

    Humbug Guest

    On 22/05/06 at 17:50:43 Zebee Johnstone somehow managed to type:

    <snip>

    > Major problem with trikes is ground clearance. Not sure I'd want to
    > use one on your typical Oz "not graded for years and corrugated to
    > hell" dirt road. For bitumen touring I think they'd be great.


    A couple of years ago I met a bloke on a Greenspeed on the Silver City
    Highway which is better than the Gunbarell Highway but not by a great
    deal. He was quite ready to swap the Greenspeed for my Giant ATX780. I
    probably would've swapped if he hadn't told me WHY...:)

    I met him again a few weeks later at Broken Hill and he was wearing a
    neck brace the need for which he directly attributed to the Greenspeed,
    the crap roads and the bouncing around.


    --

    Humbug
    Today is Boomtime, the 69th day of Discord in the YOLD 3172
     
  8. Jack Russell

    Jack Russell Guest

    Cannot tell you anything about these but they look good

    http://www.velosmith.com.au/juta.html

    Compare them with

    http://sjscycles.com
    which I can highly recommend




    AndrewJ wrote:
    > Is there anywhere in Australia a bike store or company that specialises
    > in touring bicycles? I want something that can handle non-bitumen while
    > carrying a fairly substantial load, both front and rear panniers. Don't
    > need suspension either front or rear.
    >
    > I guess my ideal is something like a Koga-Miyata world-traveller or
    > similar. Not fussed about aluminium frames but would probably prefer
    > steel.
    >
    > I've been searching for quite a while, and have not found a source.
    >
    > At the moment it seems the only path is either to import a frame from
    > Europe and assemble here, or to go there and buy one. Which is
    > interesting in one sense since I am pretty sure all the hardware is
    > created either in China or Taiwan.
    >
    > Any leads I would be grateful. I will summarise what I find.
    >
    > Many thanks in advance.
    >



    --
    Remove norubbish to reply
     
  9. In aus.bicycle on Mon, 22 May 2006 18:00:58 +1000
    Humbug <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > I met him again a few weeks later at Broken Hill and he was wearing a
    > neck brace the need for which he directly attributed to the Greenspeed,
    > the crap roads and the bouncing around.


    You can get them with suspension now I think, but yeah... no way to
    take the shock with your legs.

    I reckon I'd notice it on the unsuspended Bacchetta too. I already do
    when negotiating the bumpy bits of the Cooks River path.

    Zebee
     
  10. Nick Payne

    Nick Payne Guest

    I bought a 60cm Surly LHT frame from a local bike shop and built it up for
    loaded touring. It comes with 135mm rear spacing, three sets of bottle cage
    bosses, spare spoke carrier on the left chainstay, lowrider rack eyelets on
    the front fork, 46cm chainstays, etc. It's not the prettiest frame in the
    world but everything on it seems well constructed, the frame alignment is
    perfect, and the powdercoat finish is good quality with no pinholes. The
    frame quite comfortably takes Panaracer 700x37 tyres plus mudguards. Without
    the guards you could probably fit 700x47 with no problem. In the smaller
    sizes the frame very sensibly uses 26" rather than 700c wheels.

    http://www.surlybikes.com/longhaul.html. I think Dirtworks are the local
    distributors.

    The Trek 520 is another locally available steel touring bike, but it comes
    with Shimano 105 cranks, which even though it is a triple has overly large
    chainrings for what is supposed to be a touring bike (52-42-30). The middle
    chainring on the Trek is larger than the big chainring on my Surly.
    Cannondale do it better by having an MTB crank on their tourer, though it
    has an aluminium frame.

    Nick

    "AndrewJ" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Is there anywhere in Australia a bike store or company that specialises
    > in touring bicycles? I want something that can handle non-bitumen while
    > carrying a fairly substantial load, both front and rear panniers. Don't
    > need suspension either front or rear.
    >
    > I guess my ideal is something like a Koga-Miyata world-traveller or
    > similar. Not fussed about aluminium frames but would probably prefer
    > steel.
    >
    > I've been searching for quite a while, and have not found a source.
    >
    > At the moment it seems the only path is either to import a frame from
    > Europe and assemble here, or to go there and buy one. Which is
    > interesting in one sense since I am pretty sure all the hardware is
    > created either in China or Taiwan.
     
  11. cogcontrol

    cogcontrol New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2004
    Messages:
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    Yes there is try www.velosmith.com.au

    CC
     
  12. AndrewJ

    AndrewJ Guest

    Whew. Many thanks for all the info here. I'll take some time to digest.
    It looks like I'm up for a visit to Sydney (I'm based in Melbourne).
    Easier than trip to Amsterdam :)

    I've got a modified road bike that I'm using for touring. I took a
    strong steel frame, added strong spokes and wheels. I use a Topeak rack
    on the seat, and load that up with panniers. It is a wierd hybrid, but
    it works ok up to a point. That point being a strong upper limit on the
    carrying capacity.

    I'll study the info. Many thanks.

    Yes, I looked hard, but didn't uncover any of the leads here. Thanks.
     
  13. "AndrewJ" wrote:
    > Is there anywhere in Australia a bike store or company that specialises
    > in touring bicycles? I want something that can handle non-bitumen while
    > carrying a fairly substantial load, both front and rear panniers. Don't
    > need suspension either front or rear.
    >
    > I guess my ideal is something like a Koga-Miyata world-traveller or
    > similar. Not fussed about aluminium frames but would probably prefer
    > steel.
    >
    > I've been searching for quite a while, and have not found a source.


    In Melbourne *the* shop for touring bikes used to be Christies, but Ian has
    now sold up.

    If you don't want a ready-made bike try Abbotsford Cycles in Richmond. Peter
    Moore is developing as the touring shop of choice. He can probably supply
    you with a Surly Long Haul Trucker frame, and all the parts to build it up
    http://www.abbotsfordcycles.com.au/
    http://www.onecer.net/abbotsfordcycles/

    Also St Kilda Cycles www.stkildacycles.com.au can supply a great range of
    top qualkity touring gear, Tubus racks, Ortlieb, B&M lights, etc, and one of
    their contacts builds his own custom frames. Friend of mine had a very
    classy 26" touring MTB built up by him, in the style of the UK Thorn
    tourers. His frames are called 'Saints'.

    --
    Cheers
    Peter

    ~~~ ~ [email protected]
    ~~ ~ _- \,
    ~~ (*)/ (*)
     
  14. "Bleve" wrote:
    >
    > Ian Christie's shop was a good tourers shop but he shut up a few years
    > ago now (Melbourne), but any half decent LBS will be able to help you.
    > I think he shut because there's not that much demand and it's not
    > enough to sustain a shop, but that's a guess.


    Ian had a niche market and I believe the demand was there for his services
    and products. He wanted to make a career change, I believe (perhaps looking
    to build some retirement income too) and put the shop up for sale. Sadly
    there were no takers to buy the business outright, so he had to liqidate the
    stock. Peter Moore at Abbotsford Cycles bought most of it, and now fills a
    touring shop role.
    --
    Cheers
    Peter

    ~~~ ~ [email protected]
    ~~ ~ _- \,
    ~~ (*)/ (*)
     
  15. AndrewJ wrote:
    > Is there anywhere in Australia a bike store or company that specialises
    > in touring bicycles?


    Not as far as I'm aware.
    I believe the last was Christies in Melbourne.

    I recently went through the 72 frames suppliers in the Bicycline Year
    Book and frankliy, it was bland blankness. Any difference was in fine
    details.

    The Surly longhaul frame was the only recommendation I received. Fine if
    you only want derailleur gears. Nothing else had adjustable drop outs,
    so you'd need to have a tensioner with them.

    None of them had even the full compliment of roack and mudguard mounts
    either. so that was always going to be an additional add-on

    >I want something that can handle non-bitumen while
    > carrying a fairly substantial load, both front and rear panniers. Don't
    > need suspension either front or rear.


    You'd need to look at MTB stuff then. It really is a case of how hard
    you want to hit stuff as to whether you really must got MTB. I toured on
    lots of off bitumen on 1.25" for decade until I scored a mtb. Lowering
    your speed makes you less likely to pinch puncture, plus I used
    thornproof tubes {:).




    > Any leads I would be grateful. I will summarise what I find.


    If you are going to consider the price of a surly Longhaul frame
    ($700's?), then would you consider a custom frame?

    I am currently talking to Wayne Kotzur about having a touring frame
    built for my wife. We'll add a 8speed hub rear wheel and transfer the
    rest of her kit over.
     
  16. adam85

    adam85 New Member

    Joined:
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    Check google groups, this topic has come up on a.b more than once. Another bike available locally is the mongoose randonneur. I've got one - aluminium frame, drop bars, canti brakes, 9 speed ultegra with a 12-34 cassette, triple chainring 30-39-50 I think, and while it's not exactly top-spec, it's done plenty of miles touring fully loaded, and handles firetrails quite well with 35mm tyres.

    Adam
     
  17. Bleve

    Bleve Guest

    Peter Signorini wrote:
    > "Bleve" wrote:
    > >
    > > Ian Christie's shop was a good tourers shop but he shut up a few years
    > > ago now (Melbourne), but any half decent LBS will be able to help you.
    > > I think he shut because there's not that much demand and it's not
    > > enough to sustain a shop, but that's a guess.

    >
    > Ian had a niche market and I believe the demand was there for his services
    > and products. He wanted to make a career change, I believe (perhaps looking
    > to build some retirement income too) and put the shop up for sale. Sadly
    > there were no takers to buy the business outright, so he had to liqidate the
    > stock. Peter Moore at Abbotsford Cycles bought most of it, and now fills a
    > touring shop role.


    ahha, ok

    Thanks :)
     
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