Avanti Road Bikes..

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by davie_gillie, Nov 27, 2005.

  1. MarkC77

    MarkC77 New Member

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    I might me shot for saying this but I don't even own a proper cycling top (let alone cycling shorts) I just wear what ever t-shirt that isn't in the wash and my black nike shorts. I will probablt get a proper top but I just can't make myself wear those tight shorts. (not yet anyway) :)
     


  2. su22

    su22 New Member

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    shame about the wheels. In terms of speed and ease of riding, wheels are pretty important in helping you go faster/tire less quickly. The weight of the wheels, and then aerodynamics of the wheels/spokes, are important, because you'll be turning over the wheels constantly. If you havent already bought the Giro, then i guess you've got 2 options-- get the bike, and look for 2nd hand wheels (i personally love my Mavic Ksyriums), or don't buy a new entry-level bike, but go for a 2nd-hand carbon bike which doesn't seem like it has done much (this may be tricky if you're not sure what signs of wear to look for-- i bought my 2nd hand Giant rather naively. I had no idea about crank length and as a result got looooong cranks on a small bike).

    checking the 'true-ness' of a 2nd hand wheels might require a knowledgeable bike buddy. I think this is just checking if they spin in a straight line (no wobble). Sorry im not too clued in here

    you can give www.cycle2max.com a go for a 2nd-hand trading post.

    anyway, given that you started this thread a while ago, and you probably are having a great time on a new bike already, don't worry about your first bike-- it's hard to get everything right when you can't learn everything.


    my 2cents on jerseys:

    With all the money you spend on bikes, you still have to look respectable out there. If looking good means a lot to you, and you want whatever is more expensive locally, go shopping online for jerseys (www.probikekit.com).

    Here are no-no's:

    - jersey/knicks in a denim-pattern print (i once saw a man wear knicks like this. So wrong)
    - leopard spots (there was a leopard print jersey in the local op shop. $6, i was tempted, but it looked that bad)
    - Prize jerseys: Tour de France/Giro d'Italia/Vuelta Espana/Jacobs Creek etc. yellow, green, pink, white or polka dot jerseys. These are won by champions, you can't just buy into being King of the Mountain! But if you do wear one, you gotta make sure you can sprint like an animal or climb like a mountain goat.
    - World champ rainbow stripes: as above. World champs earn their stripes! I don't see how there's pride in buying one and wearing it. Unless you got it on sale, and use it as a cheapo ride-to-work jersey (hard to imagine).

    Here's what i think is controversial:

    - National champ stripes/jerseys: again national champs earn their colours. But personally i'd love an Australian team jersey to wear in support of our team! Or the aqua Kazhakstan one that Vino wears

    Here's what i think is ok, and can look good if you pick something nice:

    - pro team jerseys: a lot of people get the blue Gerolsteiner kit because it looks great. But this can also br determined by what's on sale on probikekit.com!
    - your work/company jersey
    - bike shop jerseys (if there's one who gives you good deals)
    - join a local cycling club and buy the club jersey (not very useful unless you're keen to race)

    Or most simply, just buy two plain jerseys to start off with (Castelli, Netti), as long as they have at least 2 pockets at the back. Assoss make good quality knicks but are $$$!! Ditto Pearl Izumi. eBay might be an option too
     
  3. Trisha14

    Trisha14 New Member

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    Hi - I just bought an Avanti Vivace which is a lower level bike than the Giro, but I find it to be a really good entry level bike. It feels light as a feather to me and already has me hooked on more road riding.
     
  4. cameron41

    cameron41 New Member

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    $800 for some new wheels? tell'm he's dreaming
    Open pro's laced to ultegra hubs for about $450 - $500 tops, bullet proof long lasting ... negotiate a trade in price ($200 for the R500)
     
  5. xtra.co.nz

    xtra.co.nz New Member

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    hi anyone know which would be a better bike to buy - an avanti Giro, or a giant ocr1 thanks
     
  6. svpower

    svpower New Member

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    Hi - I am in exactly the same position as you. i was thinking about the Avanti Giro or the Azzurri Uno. Let me know if you find anything out. The Azzurri Uno s about $100 cheaper and a friend of mine who know a bit about cycling thinks the Azzurri is better.

    S

     
  7. idler

    idler New Member

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    I'm a novice but if I could add my thoughts on 2nd hand cycling stuff at this point. a. Do your homework and be up to speed on on models and price and b. buy from a fat guy in a hilly area, you'll be pretty sure that the goods haven't seen too much action.
     
  8. davie_gillie

    davie_gillie New Member

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    Its been a while since i started this thread, but for everyone who helped, thanks alot... To really go the other way, i bought a second hand Trek 1000 off a friend, it is getting a service at the moment. I get it back on wednesday.. i decided to go the ultra cheap option, and test it out, and see how i take to it, then in a little while, upgrade depending on my likings and hopefully move a bit higher than the giro... cheers...
     
  9. peterlip

    peterlip New Member

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    Good move.
    I was thinking about getting back into cycling for the last 5 years, but couldn't bring myself to forking out my hard earned on something that I wasn't sure I would get into. Then I inherited a GVBR bike a couple of Octobers ago. I was like a duck to water. 6 months, and 1000km later, I left around $1800 in a bike shop for bike, shoes, accessories. But I knew that it would be money well spent as I was well and truely hooked.
     
  10. davie_gillie

    davie_gillie New Member

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    Out of curiosity, what bike did you upgrade too? Thinking about going all out with the accessories now, just so they are there!!
     
  11. peterlip

    peterlip New Member

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    I got a Felt F70. Best 105 equipped-triple crank-carbon forks & rear stay bike I could get at the time.
    Managed to get it under $1600, but add shoes, pump, bag, tyre levers, seat bag, a few tubes and a rear light took me to $1799. Then I added a HRM/speedo (echowell XR) for another $176 and a cateye (EL500) $59 front light.
     
  12. idler

    idler New Member

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    A few years back I finally upgraded, went through the same process as you and ended up with 2nd hand Trek 1000 - well the frame was 2nd hand. LBS put together a nice package, all 105 and it's been a terrific ride. Good luck with yours David... let us know how it comes up.
     
  13. davie_gillie

    davie_gillie New Member

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    Well, I got the trek about a week ago after being repaired, but couldnt afford pedals or a decent helmet, so I thought I would have to leave riding it for a bit...

    One of my friends, gave me a set of SPD pedals off his mountain bike, which I put on and have been using with a pair of running shoes for now... I borrowed a helmet off a friend, and unfortunately due to my incredibly large head size, it hardly sits on my head... I look like a bit of an idiot, but in the past week I have really taken to cycling... Probably only done about 150kms, but am hurting a fair bit because of it... Couple of upgrades on the bike coming up, such as a much shorter stem (130mm down to 90mm) and hopefully the ride will be alot easier..

    The knicks and jersey tan is very popular with the ladies... :eek:

    Have experienced many of those 'polite' drivers out there already, with a couple of careless drivers nearly running me off the road... but other than that, loving it so far... Most of the riders I pass wave or nod, its nice, considering they are probably laughing on the inside...

    Thanks for the help, will probably need some more soon...
     
  14. sideshow_bob

    sideshow_bob New Member

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    Carbon stays (seat and chain) are a marketing gimmick in low end bikes. They are typically significantly heavier than full aluminium stays. The benefit of course is they can offer a degree of comfort. You pay for this however by them being 'squishy' under acceleration or load. I'd personally be looking to probably stay away from a partial or full carbon rear in an entry level bike regardless of how sexy CF might look.

    Selle Italia saddles in general will fit most people because they make about 30 different saddle models/combinations. A flite for example doesnt fit everyone (me) its a rounded top, an SLR on the other hand is a wider flatter surface that suits some people (me) better. Then theres a multitude of models in between. Ultimately you will find a type that generally fits you. Given you can pick up most saddles for less than $100 and they are such a huge factor in ongoing comfort it's recommended that as you start doing more k's you invest the time doing some experimentation.

    All the SPD pedals are the same style from entry level up. Given the road bike riding I do is more continuous with little clipping and unclipping I personally evaluate pedals based on their comfort and adjustability (float and tension). I think the Looks do this better in general than Shimano cleat systems even though clipping might be marginally more difficult. Of course if you really want an easy to clip pedals you are not going to go past the Crank Brothers Quattros.

    Finally in regards to wheels it can be a mistake to evaluate the number of spokes to the weight. If you look at roadbikereview.com WH-540's are almost universally noted as being very heavy wheels. Not that thats a problem in an entry level bike just something to be aware of.

    Reading back over this I didn't really mean to critique every point in your post .. honest!! You've raised a lot of very valid points that someone should be looking at/considering/thinking about when considering a new bike.

    --brett
     
  15. fatboy61

    fatboy61 New Member

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    Yikes!! SPDs and running shoes, my feet are hurting just thinking about that.
    The nearest I come to that is riding 1 km to the shop during my lunch break with runners and Look pedals, and is bad enough.
    IMHO you would be better off with plain ole toe-clips until you can score some shoes.
    And you must introduce me to the ladies who think the biker geek tan is a good look. :D
     
  16. Roost

    Roost New Member

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    I have the 06 Giro and love it - great bike can't go wrong with it!
     
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