Avocet 35 clock is slow

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Timothy J. Lee, Jan 23, 2003.

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  1. What could be the problem with an Avocet 35 cyclocomputer whose clock is slow (about 1/2 speed)? The
    result is that speeds and distances are much greater than actual (about twice). The battery is only
    a few months old; this is the first time that I have seen this problem, despite using up batteries
    before. Resetting and recalibrating does not seem to have any effect.

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    Timothy J. Lee Unsolicited bulk or commercial email is not welcome. No warranty of any kind is
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  2. Mike Kruger

    Mike Kruger Guest

    "Timothy J. Lee" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > What could be the problem with an Avocet 35 cyclocomputer whose clock is slow (about 1/2 speed)?
    > The result is that speeds and distances are much greater than actual (about twice). The battery is
    > only a few months old; this is the first time that I have seen this problem, despite using up
    > batteries before. Resetting and recalibrating does not seem to have any effect.

    I don't know why the clock would be slow, and if that's really what's going on I'd return it.

    Because somebody has to ask the dumb question, I will: do you have it set to "kilometers" when you
    want it set to "miles"? This will make 6.2 miles show up as 10 (km), and 12.5 miles/hour show up
    as 20 (km).
     
  3. Ray Heindl

    Ray Heindl Guest

    [email protected] (Timothy J. Lee) wrote:

    > What could be the problem with an Avocet 35 cyclocomputer whose clock is slow (about 1/2 speed)?
    > The result is that speeds and distances are much greater than actual (about twice). The battery is
    > only a few months old; this is the first time that I have seen this problem, despite using up
    > batteries before. Resetting and recalibrating does not seem to have any effect.

    At a guess, I'd say it's broken. You might try taking the battery out for a while, like overnight,
    to see if it resets to normal, but don't count on it.

    I can't imagine why would a clock problem would affect distance readings; it's probably the
    microprocessor that's FUBR.

    --
    Ray Heindl
     
  4. In article <[email protected]>, Mike Kruger <[email protected]> wrote:
    >I don't know why the clock would be slow, and if that's really what's going on I'd return it.

    I've had that cyclometer for many years.

    >Because somebody has to ask the dumb question, I will: do you have it set to "kilometers" when you
    >want it set to "miles"? This will make 6.2 miles show up as 10 (km), and 12.5 miles/hour show up
    >as 20 (km).

    I tried both miles and km. At a moderate pace on flat ground on a bike with fenders and rack with a
    side bag, it was telling me that I was going over 30mph and over 50km/h.

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    Timothy J. Lee Unsolicited bulk or commercial email is not welcome. No warranty of any kind is
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  5. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    Wed, 15 Jan 2003 06:57:44 GMT, <[email protected]>, [email protected] (Timothy J.
    Lee) wrote:

    > At a moderate pace on flat ground on a bike with fenders and rack with a side bag, it was telling
    > me that I was going over 30mph and over 50km/h.

    Sell it to Fabrizio!

    It's the only performance increase he's likely to see this year. . . being as all the truely elite
    roadies are training already and he's still, to be polite, "otherwise occupied".
    --
    zk
     
  6. "Timothy J. Lee" wrote:
    >
    > What could be the problem with an Avocet 35 cyclocomputer whose clock is slow (about 1/2 speed)?
    > The result is that speeds and distances are much greater than actual (about twice). The battery is
    > only a few months old; this is the first time that I have seen this problem, despite using up
    > batteries before. Resetting and recalibrating does not seem to have any effect.

    Is the clock function itself slow? How's the stopwatch function?

    Seems to me that if the clock unit on the chip(s) is off, those functions would be the first to
    show it. Distance should be just a count of wheel revolutions, and shouldn't be affected by any
    timing function.

    If it were giving half the correct distance, I'd suspect the magnetic ring was out of kilter,
    reaching the pickup for only half the revolution. Sounds like that's not the case.

    Avocet does have a phone number for service. I'd try visiting their site and seeking help there.
    They were very cooperative when my unit acted up. They fixed it for free, despite it being years and
    years old.

    --
    Frank Krygowski [email protected]
     
  7. In article <[email protected]>, Ray Heindl <[email protected]> wrote:
    >I can't imagine why would a clock problem would affect distance readings

    Since it works by sensing the number of revolutions per second, if its definition of what a second
    is happens to be incorrect, the speed and distance will be incorrect in proportion to the
    incorrectness of what it believes a second to be.

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    Timothy J. Lee Unsolicited bulk or commercial email is not welcome. No warranty of any kind is
    provided with this message.
     
  8. Dave Lehnen

    Dave Lehnen Guest

    Timothy J. Lee wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>, Ray Heindl <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>I can't imagine why would a clock problem would affect distance readings
    >>
    >>
    >
    >Since it works by sensing the number of revolutions per second, if its definition of what a second
    >is happens to be incorrect, the speed and distance will be incorrect in proportion to the
    >incorrectness of what it believes a second to be.
    >
    >
    >
    No, Ray is right. A bad clock would affect speed, but not distance, which is based only on the
    nember of wheel revolutions and the wheel size. A bad clock would make the time-of-day and ride time
    readouts wrong, as well as speed. One thing that would make both the distance and speed too high is
    double-triggering the reed switch or sensor, possibly from incorrect magnet orientation. I don't
    know if the Avocet 35 is one of the computers that can have this problem; I know the Sigmas can. Or
    its little micro-brain may just be fried.

    Dave Lehnen
     
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