AVOID DERRI-AIR

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Bubba, Apr 18, 2003.

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  1. Bubba

    Bubba Guest

    DERRI-AIR IS A SILLY AND EXPENSIVE IDEA.

    Short version: Their bike seats are clumsy and uncomfortable, AND the manufacturer does not honor
    its posted merchandise return policy.

    Longer version: We were looking for a possible answer to the "sore-butt" problem enjoyed by those of
    us to don't ride frequently enough to develop strategic calluses. An outfit calling itself
    "Derri-Air, LLC. Of White4fish, MT" looked like a possible solution. We ordered something called
    "The Limo". The thing was HUGE! It didn't just dominate the bike - - it almost overwhelmed the
    garage. Just getting a leg over the monster required a step ladder. We sent it back and after a few
    phone calls got Derri-Air to send their next size down. It was significantly smaller but equally
    awkward. Regardless of how much or how little we inflated it, it felt like sitting on a large, dead
    armadillo.

    In December last year we sent it back to Derri-Air with a letter of explanation and waited for a
    refund. (And waited, and waited, and waited .
    . . . ) Then we tried phone calls - - about once a month. Each phone conversation would get an
    assurance that "the check would go out in the morning", however, it's pretty clear that REFUNDS
    are not part of Derri-Air' s business plan. This company is something to be avoided.

    R. H. Lippert

    Houston, TX
     
    Tags:


  2. Unless you ride around steep hills or heavy traffic, get a recumbent. They are far more comfortable,
    the more laid back, the better.

    I cruised at around 18-20 MPH on my upright. I bought a relatively slinky 'bent, and upped that to
    20-22. I bought a really slinky 'bent (M5 shockproof) and upped that to 21-23 or so. If I put some
    fairings on it, I could get over 25 MPH.

    "Bubba" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > DERRI-AIR IS A SILLY AND EXPENSIVE IDEA.
    >
    >
    >
    > Short version: Their bike seats are clumsy and uncomfortable, AND the manufacturer does not honor
    > its posted merchandise return policy.
    >
    >
    >
    > Longer version: We were looking for a possible answer to the "sore-butt" problem enjoyed by those
    > of us to don't ride frequently enough to develop strategic calluses. An outfit calling itself
    > "Derri-Air, LLC. Of White4fish, MT" looked like a possible solution. We ordered something called
    > "The Limo". The thing was HUGE! It didn't
    just
    > dominate the bike - - it almost overwhelmed the garage. Just getting a
    leg
    > over the monster required a step ladder. We sent it back and after a few phone calls got Derri-Air
    > to send their next size down. It was significantly smaller but equally awkward. Regardless of how
    > much or how little we inflated it, it felt like sitting on a large, dead armadillo.
    >
    >
    >
    > In December last year we sent it back to Derri-Air with a letter of explanation and waited for a
    > refund. (And waited, and waited, and waited
    .
    > . . . ) Then we tried phone calls - - about once a month. Each phone conversation would get an
    > assurance that "the check would go out in the morning", however, it's pretty clear that REFUNDS
    > are not part of
    Derri-Air'
    > s business plan. This company is something to be avoided.
    >
    >
    >
    > R. H. Lippert
    >
    > Houston, TX
    >
    >
     
  3. On Sat, 19 Apr 2003 01:53:36 +0000, Robert Haston wrote:

    > I cruised at around 18-20 MPH on my upright. I bought a relatively slinky 'bent, and upped that to
    > 20-22. I bought a really slinky 'bent (M5 shockproof) and upped that to 21-23 or so. If I put some
    > fairings on it, I could get over 25 MPH.

    You know, I've always heard that. I cruise around 20-22 on my wedgie bike, but around 18 on the
    bent. I've never been able to get any kind of speed advantage out of the bent.

    I think part of it is the quality of the bikes - the wedgie is a carbon fiber Trek frame with
    ultra-light wheels and the bent is a Vision R44 with relatively heavy wheels and large tires. But
    even so, one would think that on a flat, the bent would be faster. Not so for me. The R44 is pretty
    laid back, compared to some others.

    So why does everyone get a speed advantage out of a bent except me?

    -Dondo
     
  4. Doug Huffman

    Doug Huffman Guest

    'Cause you believe what you're told.

    "Captain Dondo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]...
    > On Sat, 19 Apr 2003 01:53:36 +0000, Robert Haston wrote:
    >
    >
    > > I cruised at around 18-20 MPH on my upright. I bought a relatively slinky 'bent, and upped that
    > > to 20-22. I bought a really slinky 'bent (M5 shockproof) and upped that to 21-23 or so. If I put
    > > some fairings on it, I could get over 25 MPH.
    >
    > You know, I've always heard that. I cruise around 20-22 on my wedgie bike, but around 18 on the
    > bent. I've never been able to get any kind of speed advantage out of the bent.
    >
    > I think part of it is the quality of the bikes - the wedgie is a carbon fiber Trek frame with
    > ultra-light wheels and the bent is a Vision R44 with relatively heavy wheels and large tires. But
    > even so, one would think that on a flat, the bent would be faster. Not so for me. The R44 is
    > pretty laid back, compared to some others.
    >
    > So why does everyone get a speed advantage out of a bent except me?
    >
    > -Dondo
     
  5. Ken

    Ken Guest

    "Captain Dondo" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:p[email protected]:
    > But even so, one would think that on a flat, the bent would be faster. Not so for me. The R44 is
    > pretty laid back, compared to some others. So why does everyone get a speed advantage out of a
    > bent except me?

    Depends on the design of your recumbent. Most of them don't use your leg muscles as efficiently as
    an upright bike.
     
  6. On Sat, 19 Apr 2003 15:49:14 +0000, Ken wrote:

    > Depends on the design of your recumbent. Most of them don't use your leg muscles as efficiently as
    > an upright bike.

    That's possibly true - you can't use your weight or upper body at all. I've found that riding a bent
    makes you a better wedgie rider, since you learn to relax your upper body and increase leg strength
    tremendously. (Try riding a bent with a tense upper body. You'll be all over the road.)

    -Dondo
     
  7. Jeff Wills

    Jeff Wills Guest

    "Captain Dondo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > On Sat, 19 Apr 2003 15:49:14 +0000, Ken wrote:
    >
    > > Depends on the design of your recumbent. Most of them don't use your leg muscles as efficiently
    > > as an upright bike.
    >
    > That's possibly true - you can't use your weight or upper body at all. I've found that riding a
    > bent makes you a better wedgie rider, since you learn to relax your upper body and increase leg
    > strength tremendously. (Try riding a bent with a tense upper body. You'll be all over the road.)
    >
    > -Dondo

    Ken's somewhat correct- I've never thought that I can use my glutes as effectively on my
    recumbents as on I can on my uprights. (Heck, you're sitting on your glutes!) The quads do get a
    workout, though.

    There's a heck of a lot of variety in recumbent design- and the Vision R44 isn't considered to be a
    "performance" design by 'bent aficionados. The current fashion in "fast" bents is equal size large
    wheels, like the Vision Sabers: http://www.visionbikes.com/BikesR64.html .

    'Bent riders aren't immune to wretched excess, though. One of my friends rides an M5 Carbon
    lowracer: http://www.m5-ligfietsen.com/english/modellen_eng/carbonracer2.htm Yummy...

    Jeff
     
  8. Captain Dondo <[email protected]> wrote:
    : You know, I've always heard that. I cruise around 20-22 on my wedgie bike, but around 18 on the
    : bent. I've never been able to get any kind of speed advantage out of the bent.

    : I think part of it is the quality of the bikes - the wedgie is a carbon fiber Trek frame with
    : ultra-light wheels and the bent is a Vision R44 with relatively heavy wheels and large tires. But
    : even so, one would think

    Yeah I'm faster on my Nishiki hybrid than the Vision R-40 I'm using. Neither design is extreme in
    performance... :)

    The upright has some better parts (like clipless pedals you know), I haven't ridden the bent for
    very long and I haven't pushed it too much yet...

    I'll have to get on a more performance-oriented bent, let's see what happens, maybe I'll be almost
    as fast as I'd be on a road bike. With some years of bent training and some fairings, who knows
    where I'll go. Hopefully I'll at least have lots of fun along the way :)

    --
    Risto Varanka | http://www.helsinki.fi/~rvaranka/ varis at no spam please iki fi
     
  9. On Sat, 19 Apr 2003 20:51:53 +0000, Jeff Wills wrote:

    > There's a heck of a lot of variety in recumbent design- and the Vision R44 isn't considered to be
    > a "performance" design by 'bent aficionados. The current fashion in "fast" bents is equal size
    > large wheels, like the Vision Sabers: http://www.visionbikes.com/BikesR64.html .
    >
    > 'Bent riders aren't immune to wretched excess, though. One of my friends rides an M5 Carbon
    > lowracer: http://www.m5-ligfietsen.com/english/modellen_eng/carbonracer2.htm Yummy...
    >
    >
    Definitely an "ooh, aah" bike :)

    I bought the bent after a neck injury that prevented me from riding the wedgie, and it's done a
    great job. It's also introduced two kids to riding - I've found that putting a child seat on rigid
    R44 is waaaay cool for the kids. It puts their head on level with yours, and brings them closer to
    you, so they have lots more fun. Speed was not a consideration. Now that I'm all better, I find I
    ride the bent only as a commuter and child carrier. For my uses, the lower center of gravity and
    more upright position of the R44 works well. The two equal size wheels just don't do it for me.

    Honestly, I wouldn't ride the M5. I might drool all over it, but it just doesn't seem practical....

    -Dondo
     
  10. Jeff Wills

    Jeff Wills Guest

    "Captain Dondo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    > Definitely an "ooh, aah" bike :)
    >
    <snippedy>
    > Honestly, I wouldn't ride the M5. I might drool all over it, but it just doesn't seem
    > practical....
    >
    > -Dondo

    Well, it ain't *practical*... my friend usually brings it to time trials and beats up on the other
    'bents (including most of the faired Easy Racers). However, here in the Portland/Vancouver area,
    time trials are run in all conditions- I've seen his M5 covered in road goo. He treats it to a nice
    bath when he gets home.

    Jeff
     
  11. Martin Appel

    Martin Appel Guest

  12. Anybody else get mismarked Tamer products?

    Bought a Tamer shim sizer seatpost that was "28.6 mm" on the box but what I got was a 31.4mm. Wasted
    three trips to get it. What unbelievably poor quality control at Tamer Company!

    Later I decided to simply glue two cushy rubber pads to the sit-bones area on my saddle. That was
    good enough!

    Imagine, a "Poor Richard's Suspension" from just pieces of rubber! It looks weird, but it works
    wonderfully.
     
  13. Danielle

    Danielle Guest

    [email protected] (Jayne Findhorn) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Anybody else get mismarked Tamer products?
    >
    > Bought a Tamer shim sizer seatpost that was "28.6 mm" on the box but what I got was a 31.4mm.
    > Wasted three trips to get it. What unbelievably poor quality control at Tamer Company!
    >
    > Later I decided to simply glue two cushy rubber pads to the sit-bones area on my saddle. That was
    > good enough!
    >
    > Imagine, a "Poor Richard's Suspension" from just pieces of rubber! It looks weird, but it works
    > wonderfully.

    Do you have any photos of this. I think it could help me too.
     
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