Avoiding Punctures

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Vibrant, Jan 26, 2003.

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  1. Vibrant

    Vibrant Guest

    Hi,

    I wonder if some kind person here could give me some advice on how to avoid punctures this
    time of year?

    I am relatively new to cycling and spent last winter riding an ancient Dawes Super Galaxy with
    Panaracer Pasela tyres and did not have any punctures.

    This Winter however I have replaced the Super Galaxy with a Raleigh R200, this came fitted with 23mm
    Continental Sport 1000s. These seemed OK and between the start of October and the end of the
    Christmas period I put 1500 miles on them. Then on New Years day cycling in the Cycle lane in a
    local town I ran over some glass and got punctures in both tyres. I just put this down to misfortune
    and repaired the punctures, however the following Sunday I got another puncture when a very small
    piece of flint went through the tyre. This made me think perhaps the Sport 1000s were not that good
    and so I replaced them with some Continental Ultra Gatorskins, which are described as being
    practically bullet proof and received a good write up in CW. These were OK for the first week I rode
    about 50 miles on them. Then yesterday I got a puncture in the sidewall of the back tyre, I could
    not find what had caused the puncture it almost looked like a pinch flat. This morning I got another
    puncture in the back when a shard of grit from the road penetrated the tyre.

    What can I do to avoid all these punctures? I have had 5 in the last 3 weeks and less than 200
    miles. Are the Ultra Gatorskins actually any good? I am now trying running them at a reduced
    pressure dropping from 100PSI to 80 (the tyres have 120 marked on them) will this make them any less
    likely to puncture or will I be likely to get pinch flats?

    I would be grateful for any advice or anyone has to offer.

    TIA
     
    Tags:


  2. Punctures are funny things. Avoiding pinch punctures, which you do by riding tyres which are hard
    and fat enough for the weight on the bike, and the surface, the rest is in the lap of the gods. I
    find the following tyres good. Continental Top Touring. Michelin Select Kevlar Paselas on MTB,
    Specialized Fatboys.

    You can get lots of punctures in places where there's lots of glass. Avoid
    it.
     
  3. Check your brakes don't touch the side wall when you are braking. This is a common cause of side
    wall puncture and when you inspect the tyre you wont find the culprit, just like you describe
     
  4. Simon Mason

    Simon Mason Guest

    "Vibrant" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Hi,

    >
    > What can I do to avoid all these punctures? I have had 5 in the last 3
    weeks
    > and less than 200 miles.

    Panaracer 737s - Loads of punctures Specialized Nimbus - 1 puncture in a year. Schwalbe Marathon -
    No puncture yet. Vredestein Spider - 1 pinch flat.

    Also, I ride on glass infested cycle tracks every day.

    --
    Simon Mason Anlaby East Yorkshire. 53°44'N 0°26'W http://www.simonmason.karoo.net
     
  5. > . Then on New Years day cycling in the Cycle lane in a local town I ran over some glass and got
    > punctures in both tyres. I just put this down to misfortune and repaired the punctures,
    > however the following Sunday I got another puncture when a very small piece of flint went
    > through the tyre

    On normal roads the car tyres keep the roads swept. If there is a bike lane next to the other lanes,
    then car tyres constantly sweep stuff into the bike lane, and there is nothing to sweep the debris
    out again.

    Separate bike paths do not suffer from this problem. They do, however, suffer from the occasional
    idiot smashing beer bottles onto the path.

    You may notice that experienced cyclists often dislike and avoid bike lanes (and bike paths
    alongside roads) although there are more important reasons to avoid the lanes and paths than mere
    punctures.

    Jeremy Parker

    Jeremy Parker
     
  6. Graham

    Graham Guest

    "Vibrant" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I wonder if some kind person here could give me some advice on how to avoid punctures this time
    > of year?
    >
    > I am relatively new to cycling and spent last winter riding an ancient Dawes Super Galaxy with
    > Panaracer Pasela tyres and did not have any punctures.
    >
    > This Winter however I have replaced the Super Galaxy with a Raleigh R200, this came fitted with
    > 23mm Continental Sport 1000s. These seemed OK and between the start of October and the end of the
    > Christmas period I put 1500 miles on them. Then on New Years day cycling in the Cycle lane in a
    > local town I ran over some glass and got punctures in both tyres. I just put this down to
    > misfortune and repaired the punctures, however the following Sunday I got another puncture when a
    > very small piece of flint went through the tyre. This made me think perhaps the Sport 1000s were
    > not that good and so I replaced them with some Continental Ultra Gatorskins, which are described
    > as being practically bullet proof and received a good write up in CW. These were OK for the first
    > week I rode about 50 miles on them. Then yesterday I got a puncture in the sidewall of the back
    > tyre, I could not find what had caused the puncture it almost looked like a pinch flat. This
    > morning I got another puncture in the back when a shard of grit from the road penetrated the tyre.
    >
    > What can I do to avoid all these punctures? I have had 5 in the last 3 weeks and less than 200
    > miles. Are the Ultra Gatorskins actually any good? I am now trying running them at a reduced
    > pressure dropping from 100PSI to 80 (the tyres have 120 marked on them) will this make them any
    > less likely to puncture or will I be likely to get pinch flats?
    >
    > I would be grateful for any advice or anyone has to offer.
    >
    > TIA
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    I've been using these things called slime tyre liners which are basicly tough flexible plastic bands
    which go between the inner and outer tyre. They seem to work OK, I've had very few punctures since
    I've been using them.

    They can be bought for all sorts of tyre sizes and I think they cost about £5.00 each.
     
  7. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Vibrant wrote:
    > What can I do to avoid all these punctures?

    Ride on the roads (and out of and well away from the the gutter). As you've found out, cycle
    lanes/paths/tracks cause punctures.

    > Are the Ultra Gatorskins actually any good?

    I haven't used them but suspect they're fine for most normal road cycling. Consider switching to a
    more substantial tyre though (simply with a thicker layer of rubber) if you want to continue using
    cycle paths, etc.

    > I am now trying running them at a reduced pressure dropping from 100PSI to 80 (the tyres have 120
    > marked on them) will this make them any less likely to puncture

    I don't think so.

    > or will I be likely to get pinch flats?

    Yes, although 80 is probably still enough if you avoid all the worst potholes and bumps.

    As you are running these tyres way below the optimum pressure (and on less than optimum surfaces),
    there isn't much point in using them. Might as well use tougher tyres if speed and efficiency isn't
    much of a concern.

    ~PB
     
  8. Sandy Morton

    Sandy Morton Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, "Gearóid Ó Laoi, Garry Lee"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > You can get lots of punctures in places where there's lots of glass. Avoid
    > it.

    Biggest problem I have is with hawthorns on wet days - beware of the mechanised hedge trimmer.

    --
    A T (Sandy) Morton on the Bicycle Island In the Global Village
     
  9. Tim Cain

    Tim Cain Guest

    "Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Sat, 25 Jan 2003 23:48:36 -0000, "Vibrant" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >What can I do to avoid all these punctures?
    >
    > Avoid cycle paths and places where they've been flailing the hedges, check your tyres for embedded
    > flints every few days, and keep the pressure high. 23mm tyres are a bit thin, mind, there's less
    > scope for a decent thickness of rubber on the tread (the treads on my tyres are slick, but there
    > is more rubber there).

    I think you're bang on here: Keep your eyes open for "road diamonds" and assorted shrapnel.

    Part of my morning ride goes through the local bar zone, so on Monday mornings, I'm *well* away from
    the curb to avoid the proceeds of a weekend's-worth of hilarity (usually about half a ton of
    assorted broken glass).

    >
    > You could also make a "tyre wire" if you're really having trouble, which is a loop of wire which
    > brushes flints and thorns off before they puncture (they stick into the tyre as you run over them,
    > then on the next revolution they centrifuge outwards so when they get back to the bottom they
    > stick straight in - or so the theory goes).

    I dunno about this Guy. This one's been done to death many moons ago on RBT. As far as I could see
    the "tyre saver" was beloved only of the spoke-tying brigade, and for reasons which seemed to rely
    largely on voodoo. Jobst Brandt proposed a workable (to me at least) mechanism for tyre penetration
    whereby repeated impacts on an embedded object have a marginal effect on it's depth of penetration.

    Cheers,

    Tim.
     
  10. Simon Mason

    Simon Mason Guest

    "Jeremy Parker" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > You may notice that experienced cyclists often dislike and avoid bike lanes (and bike paths
    > alongside roads) although there are more important reasons to avoid the lanes and paths than mere
    > punctures.
    >

    The most important reason for me using off road cycle tracks is that I can't get knocked off my bike
    there and since things supposedly come in threes, I'm not tempting fate by duelling with traffic
    anymore than is necessary ;-)

    --
    Simon Mason Anlaby East Yorkshire. 53°44'N 0°26'W http://www.simonmason.karoo.net
     
  11. Msa

    Msa Guest

    "I've been using these things called slime tyre liners which are "basicly tough flexible plastic
    bands which go between the inner and "outer tyre. "They seem to work OK, I've had very few punctures
    since I've been "using them.

    "They can be bought for all sorts of tyre sizes and I think they cost "about £5.00 each.

    I've recently invested in a pair of these for the winter... £7.50 for 2 from the LBS. They fit
    really neatly in a set of 23's. Oh, and now I carry a pair of surgical rubber gloves (ooh err
    missus!) to avoide getting black hands...geez don't ya hands get dirty changing a tyre when it's
    been raining!

    --
    Mark
    ______________________________________

    "Just ask yourself: What would Scooby Doo?"
     
  12. Danny Colyer

    Danny Colyer Guest

    Simon Mason wrote:
    > Schwalbe Marathon - No puncture yet.

    Hmmph! I've had 6 in the last 2 weeks (4 back, 2 front) :-(

    That's unusual, though, and they *are* good tyres. The rear tyre had come to the end of its useful
    life - I've now replaced it with a Vredestein S-Lick (because I happened to have a couple lying
    around, and they're good tyres too) and I intend to make a pair of flintcatchers.

    --
    Danny Colyer (remove safety to reply) ( http://www.juggler.net/danny ) Recumbent cycle page:
    http://www.speedy5.freeserve.co.uk/recumbents/ "He who dares not offend cannot be honest." -
    Thomas Paine
     
  13. W K

    W K Guest

    "Gearóid Ó Laoi, Garry Lee" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Punctures are funny things. Avoiding pinch punctures, which you do by riding tyres which are hard
    > and fat enough for the weight on the bike, and the surface, the rest is in the lap of the gods. I
    > find the following tyres good. Continental Top Touring. Michelin Select Kevlar Paselas on MTB,
    > Specialized Fatboys.
    >
    > You can get lots of punctures in places where there's lots of glass. Avoid
    > it.

    Avoid where I ride!

    It takes a 3-4mm shard to get through a specialized nimbus, and I regularly get the tweezers out to
    see what I've picked up - plenty of alarming but not all-the-way-through chunks of glass. The fat
    boys have nice thick rubber, which seems to be one of the main things required.
     
  14. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Sun, 26 Jan 2003 12:14:20 -0000, "Tim Cain" <[email protected]_know_what_to_cut_clara.co.uk> wrote:

    >I dunno about this Guy. This one's been done to death many moons ago on RBT.

    Well, as far as I can see the tyre saver is of very limited benefit on a big thick tyre, but more
    likely to be useful on a skinny race tyre - according to the crumblies in our club, anyway. But most
    cycle products rely on a degree of voodoo, so maybe the OP could save some punctures by sacrificing
    a chicken in the correct way :)

    Guy
    ===
    ** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com (BT ADSL and
    dynamic DNS permitting)
    NOTE: BT Openworld have now blocked port 25 (without notice), so old mail addresses may no longer
    work. Apologies.
     
  15. Danny Colyer

    Danny Colyer Guest

    Simon Mason wrote:
    > The most important reason for me using off road cycle tracks is that I can't get knocked off my
    > bike there ....

    Don't you have dogs round your way then? Or kids with footballs, or yobs dropping rocks off bridges?

    --
    Danny Colyer (remove safety to reply) ( http://www.juggler.net/danny ) Recumbent cycle page:
    http://www.speedy5.freeserve.co.uk/recumbents/ "He who dares not offend cannot be honest." -
    Thomas Paine
     
  16. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    MSA wrote:
    > Oh, and now I carry a pair of surgical rubber gloves (ooh err missus!) to avoide getting black
    > hands...geez don't ya hands get dirty changing a tyre when it's been raining!

    Yes, that crap is mainly from the brake blocks. Don't use the brakes in the rain: is one
    solution :)

    ~PB
     
  17. Tim Cain

    Tim Cain Guest

    "Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Sun, 26 Jan 2003 12:14:20 -0000, "Tim Cain" <[email protected]_know_what_to_cut_clara.co.uk> wrote:
    >
    > >I dunno about this Guy. This one's been done to death many moons ago on RBT.
    >
    > Well, as far as I can see the tyre saver is of very limited benefit on a big thick tyre, but more
    > likely to be useful on a skinny race tyre - according to the crumblies in our club, anyway. But
    > most cycle products rely on a degree of voodoo, so maybe the OP could save some punctures by
    > sacrificing a chicken in the correct way :)
    >

    Could be so. Unfortunately I ain't rich and unemployed enough to test the tyre thickness theory
    empirically. I'll stick with a keen eye on the road and crossed fingers (aka "English Voodoo").

    Cheers,

    Tim.
     
  18. Simon Mason

    Simon Mason Guest

    "Danny Colyer" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Simon Mason wrote:
    > > The most important reason for me using off road cycle tracks is that I can't get knocked off my
    > > bike there ....
    >
    > Don't you have dogs round your way then? Or kids with footballs, or yobs dropping rocks off
    > bridges?

    Yes, but not in their thousands and they're rarely fatal if you collide with one!
    --
    Simon Mason Anlaby East Yorkshire. 53°44'N 0°26'W http://www.simonmason.karoo.net
     
  19. Tim Cain

    Tim Cain Guest

    "Simon Mason" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Danny Colyer" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Simon Mason wrote:
    > > > The most important reason for me using off road cycle tracks is that I can't get knocked off
    > > > my bike there ....
    > >
    > > Don't you have dogs round your way then? Or kids with footballs, or yobs dropping rocks off
    > > bridges?
    >
    > Yes, but not in their thousands and they're rarely fatal if you collide with one!

    My fave was a bollard placed to prevent the ingress of four wheeled traffic, but on a blind bend on
    a shared-use path in Reading. It hurt and it caused a fair amount of damage.

    Perhaps Guy knows that of which I speak?

    Tim.
     
  20. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Sun, 26 Jan 2003 17:06:24 -0000, "Tim Cain" <[email protected]_know_what_to_cut_clara.co.uk> wrote:

    >My fave was a bollard placed to prevent the ingress of four wheeled traffic, but on a blind bend on
    >a shared-use path in Reading. It hurt and it caused a fair amount of damage. Perhaps Guy knows that
    >of which I speak?

    That woudl presuppose that I'd knowingly ridden on a sh*r*d us* p*th (spit, spit). Whereabouts? Not
    the one by Star Road?

    Guy
    ===
    ** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com (BT ADSL and
    dynamic DNS permitting)
    NOTE: BT Openworld have now blocked port 25 (without notice), so old mail addresses may no longer
    work. Apologies.
     
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