B&B at it's finest

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Dog3, Mar 1, 2004.

  1. Dog3

    Dog3 Guest

    I swiped this from another ng I read. I think this would make a fantastic B&B. Thanks Mike, if
    you're reading.

    Michael
    *******

    Begin article:

    In case you missed it,

    asking price of $699,920. Real estate taxes are $7,649

    House of the week: 'Lizzie Borden' B&B on market in Fall River

    01:00 AM EST on Saturday, January 17, 2004

    BY AVIS GUNTHER-ROSENBERG Journal Staff Writer

    FALL RIVER, MASS. -- On the morning of Aug. 4, 1892, Andrew J. Borden, 70, and his second wife, Abby
    Durfee Borden, 65, were brutally murdered -- struck repeatedly in the head, neck and shoulders with
    a hatchet. You can own the murder site, complete with ghostly apparitions and mysterious cat
    meowings, unexplained door closings and startling visions, loud rappings and the echoes of
    children's laughter.

    Or, if you don't believe in ghosts, you can buy a beautifully kept 3,146-square-foot Greek-revival
    residence complete with period furnishings and historical treasures to be run as a profitable bed
    and breakfast or converted back to a stately private home.

    Of course, you could go in thinking the latter, and circumstances could change your mind . . .

    The house, at 92 Second St., was built in 1845 by a carpenter whom Andrew Borden worked for. Borden
    -- who held several jobs including banker and coffin maker -- bought the house for himself, Abby,
    and his two daughters from his first marriage -- Lizzie and Emma.

    One of the major family conflicts involved the house, which Abby and Andrew wanted to stay in and
    Lizzie wanted to leave for a more elegant house overlooking the city in the Highlands. In fact,
    after Lizzie was tried and acquitted of the murder charges, she moved to a Highlands house she
    called Maplecroft. A caretaker remained here for 25 years. Ultimately, she and Emma sold it to him
    for "a dollar plus considerations."

    The house was in several different hands, until Josephine and John McGinn bought it in 1948. Their
    granddaughter, Martha McGinn, lived here during her teen years, in Emma's former bedroom.

    After their deaths, McGinn -- along with business partner Simone J. Evans converted the house to a
    bed-and-breakfast. Using historical documents and police photos from the murder scene, McGinn and
    Evans restored and furnished the house as closely as possible to the way it was in 1892, complete
    with reproductions of the floral wall coverings and carpeting, and the distinctive Victorian
    furnishings. Over time, they also acquired several items that belonged to Lizzie, including one of
    her dresses, her sewing machine, and several of her books. They even have a costume Elizabeth
    Montgomery wore in the made-for-television movie, The Legend of Lizzie Borden.

    "One of the books we got a kick out of was named, With Edged Tools," McGinn says.

    McGinn and Evans opened the bed and breakfast on Aug. 4, 1996, the 104th anniversary of the murders.

    The house has the original windows, woodwork, ornate radiators and doorknobs, and all two original
    interior doors. The central air conditioning is a modern addition, as are electricity and bathrooms.
    (The Bordens had kerosene lamps and an indoor privy in the basement with "slop pails" in the
    bedrooms.)

    And while there are things from the house that Lizzie owned at Maplecroft -
    - like her sewing machine -- most of the furnishings of this house were lost when the waterfront
    storage building they were housed in was destroyed in a hurricane.

    The dining room table, sideboard and hutch came from Maplecroft, and are of the era Lizzie lived
    there, but McGinn says she can't document that they were owned by Borden. A silver tea set on the
    sideboard was donated by a Borden descendant, but was not Borden's.

    In the entry foyer -- the entrance that Andrew Borden had some difficulty getting in on the day of
    the murder -- a mannequin is attired in Lizzie's own dress. A piano has been placed in the front
    parlor where Lizzie would have taken lessons.

    Lizzie's bedroom has both a bed and a fainting couch, as documented in stories about the house at
    the time the Bordens lived there.

    "She had to have one in case she got the vapors," McGinn says.

    But the most amazing restorations are at the two murder scenes, where police photographers provided
    stunning documentation of what the house looked like. McGinn and Evans were able to find duplicates
    of the sitting room sofa where Andrew was killed while he lay resting from the midday heat, and the
    bed and bureau of the guest room where Abby was hacked to death while changing the covers on the
    bed pillows. Copies of the photos of the bodies hang in frames on the walls above the spots they
    were found.

    Other bizarre features include the heavy wooden door -- reportedly a coffin cover made by Borden
    into a hatch -- that closes off the upstairs rooms, and a trap door in the floor of one of the third-
    floor bedrooms -- the one that belonged to the Bordens' maid Bridget, who was supposedly in the yard
    washing windows at the time of the murders. McGinn says that one of the owners after the Bordens was
    a bookie, and that the trap door led down to a dry well in the basement.

    "The story is that when Sharky got word the cops were coming to raid them, he threw the betting
    slips down through the trap door to a fire he kept burning in the basement."

    With all the eerie and ghoulish happenings in the past, is the Borden house really haunted?

    "We hear footsteps all the time," McGinn says. "I have all my life. Or a door will open or shut or
    lock by itself. But they aren't nasty. They are not malicious."

    Once, during a snowstorm, a caretaker once heard pounding on the front door, but there was no one
    there when he went to answer it, she says. Then he heard pounding on the back door, but there was no
    one there either. He thought at first someone was playing a trick on him, but there wasn't a single
    footprint in the freshly fallen snow.

    Some guests have reported hearing a woman crying. Others swear they hear children playing marbles.
    For the longest time, McGinn couldn't understand that. Then she found out about another murder
    next door.

    "We found out there were two kids next door, and their mother drowned them in the well,"
    McGinn says.

    Several people have reported hearing a cat meowing, but only the house manager reports actually
    seeing the ghostly figure of a cat.

    "People say Lizzie killed one of Abby's cats, but I have serious doubts about it," McGinn says.
    "When she died, she left a lot of money to the Animal Rescue League, and she bought her pets
    headstones when then died."

    Another frightening tale involves two maids who went up to make the bed in the guest room that Abby
    was murdered in.

    "One went downstairs, and the other went back to put towels in," McGinn says. "All of a sudden,
    there was an imprint on the bed like someone was lying there." When the other maid returned to the
    room at her insistence, she saw it, too. "The maid wouldn't even go back in the house to get her
    paycheck after that."

    Has McGinn ever actually seen a ghost? Once, as a teenager, she says: "I was coming downstairs to
    the basement to do laundry, and I saw what looked like a silhouette of a woman in Victorian clothes
    floating 3 or 4 inches off the floor."

    What did McGinn do? "I ran upstairs and did my laundry later. The laundry still needed to be done."

    Then there is the strange matter of the murder date -- Aug. 4, 1892. McGinn's grandparents, who
    had no idea they would buy the crime scene more than two decades later, were married on Aug. 4,
    1925. They signed the purchase-and- sales agreement on Aug. 4, 1947 or '48. McGinn was born on
    Aug. 4, 1954.

    McGinn and Evans have enjoyed owning this home of mysteries, but have decided to place the building
    on the market in order to spend more time with their families, McGinn says. All of the furnishings
    and some of Lizzie's clothes and personal items are included in the asking price of $699,920. Real
    estate taxes are $7,649.

    The sale price also includes the businesses. Bed and breakfast room rates are $150 to $200 a night
    and up, depending on occupancy. Emma and Lizzie's bedrooms and Andrew and Abby's bedrooms form two
    two-bedroom guest suites. There are four additional guest rooms -- one on the second floor and three
    on the third, including maid Bridget's room.

    In addition, the house connects to 5,945 square feet of commercial space that houses Leary Press.
    The business and the house sit on an 8,162-square-foot lot across from the bus station, in the heart
    of downtown Fall River.

    Paula Drake of Riverside Realty, Somerset, Mass. has the listing. For more information on the house,
    you can visit the bed-and-breakfast Web site at Lizzie-Borden.com or the Fall River Historical
    Society Web Site at LizzieBorden.org.

    http://www.projo.com/realestate/content/projo_20040117_borden.1d686e.html

    Fall River PD transcripts of questioning of Lizzie

    http://www.frpd.org/lizzie/part1.htm

    --
    Deathbed statement...

    "Codeine . . . bourbon." ~~Tallulah Bankhead, actress, d. December 12, 1968
     
    Tags:


  2. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    Dog3 wrote:
    > I swiped this from another ng I read. I think this would make a fantastic B&B. Thanks Mike, if
    > you're reading.
    >
    > Michael
    > *******

    OOOH yeah!

    Jill

    > Begin article:
    >
    > In case you missed it,
    >
    > asking price of $699,920. Real estate taxes are $7,649
    >
    > House of the week: 'Lizzie Borden' B&B on market in Fall River
    >
    > 01:00 AM EST on Saturday, January 17, 2004
    >
    > BY AVIS GUNTHER-ROSENBERG Journal Staff Writer
    >
    > FALL RIVER, MASS. -- On the morning of Aug. 4, 1892, Andrew J. Borden, 70, and his second wife,
    > Abby Durfee Borden, 65, were brutally murdered -- struck repeatedly in the head, neck and
    > shoulders with a hatchet. You can own the murder site, complete with ghostly apparitions and
    > mysterious cat meowings, unexplained door closings and startling visions, loud rappings and the
    > echoes of children's laughter.
    >
    > Or, if you don't believe in ghosts, you can buy a beautifully kept 3,146-square-foot Greek-revival
    > residence complete with period furnishings and historical treasures to be run as a profitable bed
    > and breakfast or converted back to a stately private home.
    >
    > Of course, you could go in thinking the latter, and circumstances could change your mind . . .
    >
    > The house, at 92 Second St., was built in 1845 by a carpenter whom Andrew Borden worked for.
    > Borden -- who held several jobs including banker and coffin maker -- bought the house for himself,
    > Abby, and his two daughters from his first marriage -- Lizzie and Emma.
    >
    > One of the major family conflicts involved the house, which Abby and Andrew wanted to stay in and
    > Lizzie wanted to leave for a more elegant house overlooking the city in the Highlands. In fact,
    > after Lizzie was tried and acquitted of the murder charges, she moved to a Highlands house she
    > called Maplecroft. A caretaker remained here for 25 years. Ultimately, she and Emma sold it to him
    > for "a dollar plus considerations."
    >
    > The house was in several different hands, until Josephine and John McGinn bought it in 1948. Their
    > granddaughter, Martha McGinn, lived here during her teen years, in Emma's former bedroom.
    >
    > After their deaths, McGinn -- along with business partner Simone J. Evans converted the house to a
    > bed-and-breakfast. Using historical documents and police photos from the murder scene, McGinn and
    > Evans restored and furnished the house as closely as possible to the way it was in 1892, complete
    > with reproductions of the floral wall coverings and carpeting, and the distinctive Victorian
    > furnishings. Over time, they also acquired several items that belonged to Lizzie, including one of
    > her dresses, her sewing machine, and several of her books. They even have a costume Elizabeth
    > Montgomery wore in the made-for-television movie, The Legend of Lizzie Borden.
    >
    > "One of the books we got a kick out of was named, With Edged Tools," McGinn says.
    >
    > McGinn and Evans opened the bed and breakfast on Aug. 4, 1996, the 104th anniversary of the
    > murders.
    >
    > The house has the original windows, woodwork, ornate radiators and doorknobs, and all two original
    > interior doors. The central air conditioning is a modern addition, as are electricity and
    > bathrooms. (The Bordens had kerosene lamps and an indoor privy in the basement with "slop pails"
    > in the bedrooms.)
    >
    > And while there are things from the house that Lizzie owned at Maplecroft - - like her sewing
    > machine -- most of the furnishings of this house were lost when the waterfront storage building
    > they were housed in was destroyed in a hurricane.
    >
    > The dining room table, sideboard and hutch came from Maplecroft, and are of the era Lizzie lived
    > there, but McGinn says she can't document that they were owned by Borden. A silver tea set on the
    > sideboard was donated by a Borden descendant, but was not Borden's.
    >
    > In the entry foyer -- the entrance that Andrew Borden had some difficulty getting in on the day of
    > the murder -- a mannequin is attired in Lizzie's own dress. A piano has been placed in the front
    > parlor where Lizzie would have taken lessons.
    >
    > Lizzie's bedroom has both a bed and a fainting couch, as documented in stories about the house at
    > the time the Bordens lived there.
    >
    > "She had to have one in case she got the vapors," McGinn says.
    >
    > But the most amazing restorations are at the two murder scenes, where police photographers
    > provided stunning documentation of what the house looked like. McGinn and Evans were able to find
    > duplicates of the sitting room sofa where Andrew was killed while he lay resting from the midday
    > heat, and the bed and bureau of the guest room where Abby was hacked to death while changing the
    > covers on the bed pillows. Copies of the photos of the bodies hang in frames on the walls above
    > the spots they were found.
    >
    > Other bizarre features include the heavy wooden door -- reportedly a coffin cover made by Borden
    > into a hatch -- that closes off the upstairs rooms, and a trap door in the floor of one of the third-
    > floor bedrooms -- the one that belonged to the Bordens' maid Bridget, who was supposedly in the
    > yard washing windows at the time of the murders. McGinn says that one of the owners after the
    > Bordens was a bookie, and that the trap door led down to a dry well in the basement.
    >
    > "The story is that when Sharky got word the cops were coming to raid them, he threw the betting
    > slips down through the trap door to a fire he kept burning in the basement."
    >
    > With all the eerie and ghoulish happenings in the past, is the Borden house really haunted?
    >
    > "We hear footsteps all the time," McGinn says. "I have all my life. Or a door will open or shut or
    > lock by itself. But they aren't nasty. They are not malicious."
    >
    > Once, during a snowstorm, a caretaker once heard pounding on the front door, but there was no one
    > there when he went to answer it, she says. Then he heard pounding on the back door, but there was
    > no one there either. He thought at first someone was playing a trick on him, but there wasn't a
    > single footprint in the freshly fallen snow.
    >
    > Some guests have reported hearing a woman crying. Others swear they hear children playing marbles.
    > For the longest time, McGinn couldn't understand that. Then she found out about another murder
    > next door.
    >
    > "We found out there were two kids next door, and their mother drowned them in the well,"
    > McGinn says.
    >
    > Several people have reported hearing a cat meowing, but only the house manager reports actually
    > seeing the ghostly figure of a cat.
    >
    > "People say Lizzie killed one of Abby's cats, but I have serious doubts about it," McGinn says.
    > "When she died, she left a lot of money to the Animal Rescue League, and she bought her pets
    > headstones when then died."
    >
    > Another frightening tale involves two maids who went up to make the bed in the guest room that
    > Abby was murdered in.
    >
    > "One went downstairs, and the other went back to put towels in," McGinn says. "All of a sudden,
    > there was an imprint on the bed like someone was lying there." When the other maid returned to the
    > room at her insistence, she saw it, too. "The maid wouldn't even go back in the house to get her
    > paycheck after that."
    >
    > Has McGinn ever actually seen a ghost? Once, as a teenager, she says: "I was coming downstairs to
    > the basement to do laundry, and I saw what looked like a silhouette of a woman in Victorian
    > clothes floating 3 or 4 inches off the floor."
    >
    > What did McGinn do? "I ran upstairs and did my laundry later. The laundry still needed to
    > be done."
    >
    > Then there is the strange matter of the murder date -- Aug. 4, 1892. McGinn's grandparents, who
    > had no idea they would buy the crime scene more than two decades later, were married on Aug. 4,
    > 1925. They signed the purchase-and- sales agreement on Aug. 4, 1947 or '48. McGinn was born on
    > Aug. 4, 1954.
    >
    > McGinn and Evans have enjoyed owning this home of mysteries, but have decided to place the
    > building on the market in order to spend more time with their families, McGinn says. All of the
    > furnishings and some of Lizzie's clothes and personal items are included in the asking price of
    > $699,920. Real estate taxes are $7,649.
    >
    > The sale price also includes the businesses. Bed and breakfast room rates are $150 to $200 a night
    > and up, depending on occupancy. Emma and Lizzie's bedrooms and Andrew and Abby's bedrooms form two
    > two-bedroom guest suites. There are four additional guest rooms -- one on the second floor and
    > three on the third, including maid Bridget's room.
    >
    > In addition, the house connects to 5,945 square feet of commercial space that houses Leary Press.
    > The business and the house sit on an 8,162-square-foot lot across from the bus station, in the
    > heart of downtown Fall River.
    >
    > Paula Drake of Riverside Realty, Somerset, Mass. has the listing. For more information on the
    > house, you can visit the bed-and-breakfast Web site at Lizzie-Borden.com or the Fall River
    > Historical Society Web Site at LizzieBorden.org.
    >
    > http://www.projo.com/realestate/content/projo_20040117_borden.1d686e.html
    >
    > Fall River PD transcripts of questioning of Lizzie
    >
    > http://www.frpd.org/lizzie/part1.htm
     
  3. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    Dog3 wrote:
    > I swiped this from another ng I read. I think this would make a fantastic B&B. Thanks Mike, if
    > you're reading.
    >
    > Michael
    > *******
    Micheal, you and I just *have* to go in on this place. Together we can cook up a mean "forty whacks"
    breakfast and a "forty-one brunch" heheh

    Jill
    > Begin article:
    >
    > In case you missed it,
    >
    > asking price of $699,920. Real estate taxes are $7,649
    >
    > House of the week: 'Lizzie Borden' B&B on market in Fall River
    >
    > 01:00 AM EST on Saturday, January 17, 2004
    >
    > BY AVIS GUNTHER-ROSENBERG Journal Staff Writer
    >
    > FALL RIVER, MASS. -- On the morning of Aug. 4, 1892, Andrew J. Borden, 70, and his second wife,
    > Abby Durfee Borden, 65, were brutally murdered -- struck repeatedly in the head, neck and
    > shoulders with a hatchet. You can own the murder site, complete with ghostly apparitions and
    > mysterious cat meowings, unexplained door closings and startling visions, loud rappings and the
    > echoes of children's laughter.
    >
    > Or, if you don't believe in ghosts, you can buy a beautifully kept 3,146-square-foot Greek-revival
    > residence complete with period furnishings and historical treasures to be run as a profitable bed
    > and breakfast or converted back to a stately private home.
    >
    > Of course, you could go in thinking the latter, and circumstances could change your mind . . .
    >
    > The house, at 92 Second St., was built in 1845 by a carpenter whom Andrew Borden worked for.
    > Borden -- who held several jobs including banker and coffin maker -- bought the house for himself,
    > Abby, and his two daughters from his first marriage -- Lizzie and Emma.
    >
    > One of the major family conflicts involved the house, which Abby and Andrew wanted to stay in and
    > Lizzie wanted to leave for a more elegant house overlooking the city in the Highlands. In fact,
    > after Lizzie was tried and acquitted of the murder charges, she moved to a Highlands house she
    > called Maplecroft. A caretaker remained here for 25 years. Ultimately, she and Emma sold it to him
    > for "a dollar plus considerations."
    >
    > The house was in several different hands, until Josephine and John McGinn bought it in 1948. Their
    > granddaughter, Martha McGinn, lived here during her teen years, in Emma's former bedroom.
    >
    > After their deaths, McGinn -- along with business partner Simone J. Evans converted the house to a
    > bed-and-breakfast. Using historical documents and police photos from the murder scene, McGinn and
    > Evans restored and furnished the house as closely as possible to the way it was in 1892, complete
    > with reproductions of the floral wall coverings and carpeting, and the distinctive Victorian
    > furnishings. Over time, they also acquired several items that belonged to Lizzie, including one of
    > her dresses, her sewing machine, and several of her books. They even have a costume Elizabeth
    > Montgomery wore in the made-for-television movie, The Legend of Lizzie Borden.
    >
    > "One of the books we got a kick out of was named, With Edged Tools," McGinn says.
    >
    > McGinn and Evans opened the bed and breakfast on Aug. 4, 1996, the 104th anniversary of the
    > murders.
    >
    > The house has the original windows, woodwork, ornate radiators and doorknobs, and all two original
    > interior doors. The central air conditioning is a modern addition, as are electricity and
    > bathrooms. (The Bordens had kerosene lamps and an indoor privy in the basement with "slop pails"
    > in the bedrooms.)
    >
    > And while there are things from the house that Lizzie owned at Maplecroft - - like her sewing
    > machine -- most of the furnishings of this house were lost when the waterfront storage building
    > they were housed in was destroyed in a hurricane.
    >
    > The dining room table, sideboard and hutch came from Maplecroft, and are of the era Lizzie lived
    > there, but McGinn says she can't document that they were owned by Borden. A silver tea set on the
    > sideboard was donated by a Borden descendant, but was not Borden's.
    >
    > In the entry foyer -- the entrance that Andrew Borden had some difficulty getting in on the day of
    > the murder -- a mannequin is attired in Lizzie's own dress. A piano has been placed in the front
    > parlor where Lizzie would have taken lessons.
    >
    > Lizzie's bedroom has both a bed and a fainting couch, as documented in stories about the house at
    > the time the Bordens lived there.
    >
    > "She had to have one in case she got the vapors," McGinn says.
    >
    > But the most amazing restorations are at the two murder scenes, where police photographers
    > provided stunning documentation of what the house looked like. McGinn and Evans were able to find
    > duplicates of the sitting room sofa where Andrew was killed while he lay resting from the midday
    > heat, and the bed and bureau of the guest room where Abby was hacked to death while changing the
    > covers on the bed pillows. Copies of the photos of the bodies hang in frames on the walls above
    > the spots they were found.
    >
    > Other bizarre features include the heavy wooden door -- reportedly a coffin cover made by Borden
    > into a hatch -- that closes off the upstairs rooms, and a trap door in the floor of one of the third-
    > floor bedrooms -- the one that belonged to the Bordens' maid Bridget, who was supposedly in the
    > yard washing windows at the time of the murders. McGinn says that one of the owners after the
    > Bordens was a bookie, and that the trap door led down to a dry well in the basement.
    >
    > "The story is that when Sharky got word the cops were coming to raid them, he threw the betting
    > slips down through the trap door to a fire he kept burning in the basement."
    >
    > With all the eerie and ghoulish happenings in the past, is the Borden house really haunted?
    >
    > "We hear footsteps all the time," McGinn says. "I have all my life. Or a door will open or shut or
    > lock by itself. But they aren't nasty. They are not malicious."
    >
    > Once, during a snowstorm, a caretaker once heard pounding on the front door, but there was no one
    > there when he went to answer it, she says. Then he heard pounding on the back door, but there was
    > no one there either. He thought at first someone was playing a trick on him, but there wasn't a
    > single footprint in the freshly fallen snow.
    >
    > Some guests have reported hearing a woman crying. Others swear they hear children playing marbles.
    > For the longest time, McGinn couldn't understand that. Then she found out about another murder
    > next door.
    >
    > "We found out there were two kids next door, and their mother drowned them in the well,"
    > McGinn says.
    >
    > Several people have reported hearing a cat meowing, but only the house manager reports actually
    > seeing the ghostly figure of a cat.
    >
    > "People say Lizzie killed one of Abby's cats, but I have serious doubts about it," McGinn says.
    > "When she died, she left a lot of money to the Animal Rescue League, and she bought her pets
    > headstones when then died."
    >
    > Another frightening tale involves two maids who went up to make the bed in the guest room that
    > Abby was murdered in.
    >
    > "One went downstairs, and the other went back to put towels in," McGinn says. "All of a sudden,
    > there was an imprint on the bed like someone was lying there." When the other maid returned to the
    > room at her insistence, she saw it, too. "The maid wouldn't even go back in the house to get her
    > paycheck after that."
    >
    > Has McGinn ever actually seen a ghost? Once, as a teenager, she says: "I was coming downstairs to
    > the basement to do laundry, and I saw what looked like a silhouette of a woman in Victorian
    > clothes floating 3 or 4 inches off the floor."
    >
    > What did McGinn do? "I ran upstairs and did my laundry later. The laundry still needed to
    > be done."
    >
    > Then there is the strange matter of the murder date -- Aug. 4, 1892. McGinn's grandparents, who
    > had no idea they would buy the crime scene more than two decades later, were married on Aug. 4,
    > 1925. They signed the purchase-and- sales agreement on Aug. 4, 1947 or '48. McGinn was born on
    > Aug. 4, 1954.
    >
    > McGinn and Evans have enjoyed owning this home of mysteries, but have decided to place the
    > building on the market in order to spend more time with their families, McGinn says. All of the
    > furnishings and some of Lizzie's clothes and personal items are included in the asking price of
    > $699,920. Real estate taxes are $7,649.
    >
    > The sale price also includes the businesses. Bed and breakfast room rates are $150 to $200 a night
    > and up, depending on occupancy. Emma and Lizzie's bedrooms and Andrew and Abby's bedrooms form two
    > two-bedroom guest suites. There are four additional guest rooms -- one on the second floor and
    > three on the third, including maid Bridget's room.
    >
    > In addition, the house connects to 5,945 square feet of commercial space that houses Leary Press.
    > The business and the house sit on an 8,162-square-foot lot across from the bus station, in the
    > heart of downtown Fall River.
    >
    > Paula Drake of Riverside Realty, Somerset, Mass. has the listing. For more information on the
    > house, you can visit the bed-and-breakfast Web site at Lizzie-Borden.com or the Fall River
    > Historical Society Web Site at LizzieBorden.org.
    >
    > http://www.projo.com/realestate/content/projo_20040117_borden.1d686e.html
    >
    > Fall River PD transcripts of questioning of Lizzie
    >
    > http://www.frpd.org/lizzie/part1.htm
     
  4. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    jmcquown wrote:
    >
    > Dog3 wrote:
    > > I swiped this from another ng I read. I think this would make a fantastic B&B. Thanks Mike, if
    > > you're reading.
    > >
    > > Michael
    > > *******
    > Micheal, you and I just *have* to go in on this place. Together we can cook up a mean "forty
    > whacks" breakfast and a "forty-one brunch" heheh
    >
    > Jill
    > > Begin article:
    > >
    > > In case you missed it,
    > >
    > > asking price of $699,920. Real estate taxes are $7,649
    > >
    > > House of the week: 'Lizzie Borden' B&B on market in Fall River

    Okay, but it would have to be heavy on the BAM!!!!!!! Kick it up a notch! as Emeril is from
    Fall River.

    nancy
     
  5. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    Nancy Young wrote:
    > jmcquown wrote:
    >>
    >> Dog3 wrote:
    >>> I swiped this from another ng I read. I think this would make a fantastic B&B. Thanks Mike, if
    >>> you're reading.
    >>>
    >>> Michael
    >>> *******
    >> Micheal, you and I just *have* to go in on this place. Together we can cook up a mean "forty
    >> whacks" breakfast and a "forty-one brunch" heheh
    >>
    >> Jill
    >>> Begin article:
    >>>
    >>> In case you missed it,
    >>>
    >>> asking price of $699,920. Real estate taxes are $7,649
    >>>
    >>> House of the week: 'Lizzie Borden' B&B on market in Fall River
    >
    > Okay, but it would have to be heavy on the BAM!!!!!!! Kick it up a notch! as Emeril is from
    > Fall River.
    >
    > nancy

    Gawd, did he kill his parents?! And why does he keep pretending he's Cajun?

    Jill
     
  6. Dog3

    Dog3 Guest

    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> deliciously posted in
    news:[email protected]:

    > Dog3 wrote:
    >> I swiped this from another ng I read. I think this would make a fantastic B&B. Thanks Mike, if
    >> you're reading.
    >>
    >> Michael
    >> *******
    > Micheal, you and I just *have* to go in on this place. Together we can cook up a mean "forty
    > whacks" breakfast and a "forty-one brunch" heheh
    >
    > Jill

    Don't you just know it. Now, for a cocktail menu. Hmmm... bucket of blood..y... marys...
    stop me now ;)

    Michael
    --
    Deathbed statement...

    "Codeine . . . bourbon." ~~Tallulah Bankhead, actress, d. December 12, 1968
     
  7. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    Dog3 wrote:
    > "jmcquown" <[email protected]> deliciously posted in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    >> Dog3 wrote:
    >>> I swiped this from another ng I read. I think this would make a fantastic B&B. Thanks Mike, if
    >>> you're reading.
    >>>
    >>> Michael
    >>> *******
    >> Micheal, you and I just *have* to go in on this place. Together we can cook up a mean "forty
    >> whacks" breakfast and a "forty-one brunch" heheh
    >>
    >> Jill
    >
    > Don't you just know it. Now, for a cocktail menu. Hmmm... bucket of blood..y... marys... stop
    > me now ;)
    >
    > Michael

    That 'cocktail' has to include chunks of lobster and crab meat, sliced green onion, spicy chilled
    V-8. Welcome to our Haunted House :)

    Jill
     
  8. Dog3

    Dog3 Guest

    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> deliciously posted in
    news:[email protected]:

    > Nancy Young wrote:
    >> jmcquown wrote:
    >>>
    >>> Dog3 wrote:
    >>>> I swiped this from another ng I read. I think this would make a fantastic B&B. Thanks Mike, if
    >>>> you're reading.
    >>>>
    >>>> Michael
    >>>> *******
    >>> Micheal, you and I just *have* to go in on this place. Together we can cook up a mean "forty
    >>> whacks" breakfast and a "forty-one brunch" heheh
    >>>
    >>> Jill
    >>>> Begin article:
    >>>>
    >>>> In case you missed it,
    >>>>
    >>>> asking price of $699,920. Real estate taxes are $7,649
    >>>>
    >>>> House of the week: 'Lizzie Borden' B&B on market in Fall River
    >>
    >> Okay, but it would have to be heavy on the BAM!!!!!!! Kick it up a notch! as Emeril is from
    >> Fall River.
    >>
    >> nancy
    >
    > Gawd, did he kill his parents?! And why does he keep pretending he's Cajun?
    >
    > Jill

    Hell, his mom is on his cooking live show 1/2 the time. She's Hilda. He's always claimed a Portugese
    heritage (I think). He does the Cajun gig to plug his restaurants in NO.

    Michael
    --
    Deathbed statement...

    "Codeine . . . bourbon." ~~Tallulah Bankhead, actress, d. December 12, 1968
     
  9. Dog3 wrote:
    >
    > I swiped this from another ng I read. I think this would make a fantastic B&B. Thanks Mike, if
    > you're reading.
    >
    > Michael
    > *******
    >
    > Begin article:
    >
    > In case you missed it,
    >
    > asking price of $699,920. Real estate taxes are $7,649
    >
    > House of the week: 'Lizzie Borden' B&B on market in Fall River

    I wanted to stay there a couple of years ago when I made my first trip to New England. Unfortunately
    it was way too expensive. I drove by it when I was in Fall River visiting Lizzie's grave. The house
    didn't even look occupied from the street in front. I imagine there must be a back entrance that
    people use since there's no parking on the street in front. Anyone else know the Chad Mitchell
    Trio's version of the Lizzie Borden song?

    Yesterday in old Fall River, Mr. Andrew Borden died. And they got his daughter Lizzie on a charge of
    homicide. Some folks says she didn't do it and others say of course she did. But they all agreed
    Miss Lizzie, she was a problem kind a kid. Cause you can't chop your Papa up in Massachusetts. Not
    even if it's planned as a surprise, a surprise! No you can't chop your Papa up in Massachusetts. You
    know how neighbors love to criticize.

    Lizzie is one of my heros! ;-) She sure knew how to deal with an evil step-parent.

    Kate, who has had more than her share of evil step-relatives.

    P.S. Actually, though, I'm not convinced she did it.

    --
    Kate Connally “If I were as old as I feel, I’d be dead already.” Goldfish: “The wholesome snack that
    smiles back, Until you bite their heads off.” What if the hokey pokey really *is* what it's all
    about? mailto:[email protected]
     
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